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Topic: Overlocker advice needed - Janome 644D and coverlocking?  (Read 2198 times)
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bethrealistic
« on: July 05, 2008 09:47:09 PM »

I am looking to purchase a second hand domestic overlocker and was wondering if anyone had any comments about this machine (the Janome 644D)? Good/bad points? Or perhaps you can reccommend a better option?

I have heard that the Janome 644D doesn't do a coverlock stitch - could someone also explain what coverlocking is, and what I might use it for?

Many many thanks for your help! I really appreciate any advice more experienced Craftsters can give me.

(Please don't warn me about buying second hand, though. I'm a student so this is the only way I can afford a better model of machine!)
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mmd32
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2008 11:50:43 PM »

I have a Janome 744D (the next model out), and I love it. Though, I am not expert, and haven't ever had another one, so I can't compare, lol. But from what I saw when I was looking, the 644D is a solid machine, with good reviews. I was looking for that one, when I found the other (I also bought second hand, on eBay).

A coverlock is the stitch you will find, say, on the hem of your t-shirt, or topstitching the sleeves where they join the shoulders. This model doesn't have it, but I'm doing fine just switching to a twin needle for the same effect on my regular machine.

HTH!
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bethrealistic
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2008 05:05:26 PM »

I have a Janome 744D (the next model out), and I love it. Though, I am not expert, and haven't ever had another one, so I can't compare, lol. But from what I saw when I was looking, the 644D is a solid machine, with good reviews. I was looking for that one, when I found the other (I also bought second hand, on eBay).

A coverlock is the stitch you will find, say, on the hem of your t-shirt, or topstitching the sleeves where they join the shoulders. This model doesn't have it, but I'm doing fine just switching to a twin needle for the same effect on my regular machine.

HTH!

Thanks, good to know!

I think from what you're saying a coverlock is similar to a regular overlock stitch but without the knife action?
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mmd32
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2008 05:38:34 PM »

Well, since you can drop the knives on my machine, I think there must be more to it.
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2008 07:13:36 AM »

Quote
Please don't warn me about buying second hand, though.

Clearly you haven't met me yet- I reccomend buying second hand, all the time!! Reputable shops are best, if you are lucky enough to have one in your area. If not, really check out the seller and or the equipment as much as possible prior to purchase. If you are using Craig's List or similar, you should have an opportunity to test out the machine for yourself. If you are using ebay or similar, really go over the sellers profile, not just their feedback- feedback doesn't tell you how much they know about what they are selling, don't be afraid to ask questions before purchase.
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paroper
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2008 07:00:58 AM »

It's called a cover stitch.  THe stitches of a serger can stretch...so this is the beauty of a coverstitch.  If you look at the finished edges of sweatshirt, t-'s, stretch sports pants, etc, you'll often find a folded edge with two rows of finished stitching...looks like it was done with a double needle.  If you look at the back, you'll see that it is finished (looped) like a serger.  That is a coverstitch.  If you stretch the garment when you put it on, the stitches do not pop (unlike regular sewing machine stitches).  The knives are disengaged and the needles, if you have a regular serger are usually moved further toward the outside of the machine to allow the hem to pass under the presser foot.  My machine even has an attachment that will fold the fabric for me to a pre-set amount so that I don't have to trim the hem or estimate where the hem will fall. 

There are machines that just coverstitch.  Many of these have preset needle widths and you simply get a two thread coverstitch.  They are nice, not too expensive and you can leave them set up.   There are machines that convert to coverstitch and have secondary threading for the coverstitch.  Many of these will all 2-3 thread coverstitch on top and the width of the coverstitch may be adjustable.  These are nice machines but can take a bit to set up for coverstitch operation.  Also, many of the machines which do this will also do a 4 thread serge with a chainstitch, like you often see in purchased garments. 

I really like the coverstitch and if you are doing a lot of knits, it is invaluable.  I also use a 2-thread rolled hem a lot for finishing fine edges.  If you invest in a machine, whether it has coverstitch or not, you might want to look for this feature. 
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