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Topic: Grainline?  (Read 660 times)
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heil_kitler
« on: June 18, 2008 12:04:50 AM »

I don't understand.. When you line up the grainline arrow with the fabric should it be going in the direction that the fabric stretches or the way it DOESN'T stretch?
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Hatshepsut
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2008 12:41:26 AM »

Hi!

It should be the way it doesn't stretch, that's the grainline.

If the fabric stretchs, that's the bias.

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heil_kitler
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2008 08:29:48 AM »

Hi!

It should be the way it doesn't stretch, that's the grainline.

If the fabric stretchs, that's the bias.



Ahh thank you~~ ^_^
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paroper
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2008 08:49:16 AM »

It depends on the type of fabric.   Knits can be 2 way or 4 way.  4 Way knits will stretch both directions.  Woven fabrics are made so that a line of thread is stretched lengthwise and then another line of thread is woven, usually in and out each thread going back and forth across the length.  So you have lengthwise grain and crosswise grain.  MOST woven fabrics are strongest on the lengthwise grain and slightly less strong on the crosswise grain.  If the fabric is woven, MOST of the time, people line up the arrow with the lengthwise grain. However, again, if the fabric is woven, it is not entirely out of the question to fold the selvages (finished edges) together and use the cross wise grain. 

BIAS is defined as 45 degrees off the grain.  Fabrics stretch on the bias...but they will sag if they are made off-grain, even slightly.  There are garments which are made on the bias (45 degrees) to take advantage of the natural stretch of the garment.  Often these are things like plaid skirts made on the bias, circular skirts, long flowing evening gowns are often made on the bias.  I have cut entire lengths of evening gowns which were made on the bias.  Used correctly, this can be very effective.  The portion of the skirt that is cut on the grainline will hang straight while the portion cut on the bias will drape.  Sometimes you'll see garments with bias at the sides, in line with the middle of the pattern piece, going down the front of the legs or with the bias in front.  Dresses that are cut on the true bias need to hang at least 24 hours before hemming and they should be hemmed after being measured from the floor.  The hem will not be straight otherwise. 

Garments that are never cut off-grain or off-bias...they never hang right, fit right..if it is pants, they often tend to twist.  They don't hold their shape well and they will look cheap and just "not right". 

To correctly place a garment on the straight of grain (SOG)...match your selvages carefully.  You do not want to have a buckle at the fold.  This will indicate that the fabric is slipped off bias up or down.  The fabric should lay flat.  If you have a line in your fabric that is woven, you can use that line across or up and down to properly fold your fabric. 

Place your pattern on the fabric according to the diagram, using the folding pattern shown in the diagram.  Place a pin at one end of the arrow on your pattern.  Measure from the arrow to the edge of the fabric.  I will measure from the corner where the arrow point and line meet.  Record that measurment. I mark it with my fingernail.  Now, take the measuring tape to the other end of the arrow.  Place that mark (from the first measurment) on the edge of the fabric, lay your tape on the fabric and measure up to the same place on the arrow at the other end.  You will more than likely need to move your pattern until the measurment is correct.  Stabilize the pattern with your hand and pin.  The pins should run at 90 degrees to the line so that the pattern will move easily.  Once you have pinned both ends of your pattern, remeasure to make sure they are the same.  If they are not, remeasure the last end and go back to the beginning and move the pattern until it matches.  Anytime you move the pattern, you should remeasure.  It rarely takes more than twice to get it correct, most of the time, one pinning will do it.

As for knits, they are almost without exception laid on the length of grain. I cannot think of a single reason that you would ever change the grainline on knits.   

Patterns that are suited for bias lay-out will be marked with the proper grainline for this.  You should not arbitrarily change the grainline of a pattern.  Some patterns will come with two grainline arrows.  In that case, you can choose the grainline suitable for your fabric and taste.  However, in patterns that have two grainlines marked, you would never make the front on one grainline and the back on another. 
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hoxierice
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2008 08:56:46 AM »

What are you making? What do you mean by "stretch"? Is your fabric knit or woven? I think knit when I hear stretch, even though the cross grain of a woven fabric generally has a little tiny bit of stretch.

If you are working with a woven the grain line goes on the straight grain, parallel to the selvedge edge (the bound edge) the cross grain, is the grain that goes from selvedge edge to selvedge edge (perpendicular to the selvedge edge). Bias is found by created a 45 degree angle in between the straight and the cross grains.

In knit you want the stretch to go across your body, you want it to stretch around you, not up and down you.

It looks like you got an answer while I was typing, but since I wrote it I'll still post.
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hoxierice
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« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2008 09:01:21 AM »

As for knits, they are almost without exception laid on the length of grain. I cannot think of a single reason that you would ever change the grainline on knits.   

Not to take this discussion in a completely different direction, but a few months ago I made some knit dresses from a Vogue pattern where the pieces were on the bias. I have no idea why, but we made them and they looked beautiful. It could just be a crazy vogue thing....
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paroper
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2008 09:22:33 AM »

No, not a crazy Vogue thing.  I touched on it above...it has to do with flow.  I was going to show you the dress I made from Vogue which was totally cut on the bias but it has since been discontinued.  Many of their clingy sexy garments are cut on the bias...
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hoxierice
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« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2008 11:13:53 AM »

Are we talking about the same thing? I was referring to your statement on knits
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Wildflowers
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« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2008 08:59:52 PM »

There are two basic grain lines, the warp and the weft.

The warp threads are the strongest threads in a woven fabric, and run parallel with the selvage edge of woven fabric.

The filler/weft threads cross the warp threads at a right angle.  People sometimes pull one of these threads to find the true grain of the fabric, since you don't have a selvage to work off of.

Measuring a 45 degree angle from a selvage edge gives you the true bias.  The bias is the angle in which a woven fabric will have its most stretch.

Patterns use the grain line as part of the design.  If you use a bias layout on a skirt for example, you will get a beautiful flow to the skirt if it has been designed to use the bias.  Not using a bias when required can cause a pattern to not fit correctly.

Always follow the grain line of the fabric when laying out a pattern's grain line, and most of the time you will need to work off of a selvage edge to get a true grain line.  Sometimes, this means you will have to cut one piece of the pattern at a time.  Be SURE to follow the instructions carefully, noting the right and wrong sides of your fabric, or you can end up with 2 identical pieces when you really wanted mirror image pieces.

If you ever move on to draping or flat pattern design it is ALL ABOUT grain lines.
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heil_kitler
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2008 09:20:18 PM »

What are you making? What do you mean by "stretch"? Is your fabric knit or woven? I think knit when I hear stretch, even though the cross grain of a woven fabric generally has a little tiny bit of stretch.

If you are working with a woven the grain line goes on the straight grain, parallel to the selvedge edge (the bound edge) the cross grain, is the grain that goes from selvedge edge to selvedge edge (perpendicular to the selvedge edge). Bias is found by created a 45 degree angle in between the straight and the cross grains.

In knit you want the stretch to go across your body, you want it to stretch around you, not up and down you.

It looks like you got an answer while I was typing, but since I wrote it I'll still post.

Well, I'm making a doll but the book said if I didn't get it right my doll would look chubby lol~~ Tongue
I'm working with jersey~ But I think I got it right! Thanks a lot though that helped me out with the woven part for future reference~
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