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Topic: Soysilk: NOT WORKING!  (Read 899 times)
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Miss Violaceous
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« on: July 02, 2008 03:07:50 PM »

I have been attempting to dye soysilk roving with Wilton's and vinegar. Most of the colors will not stick... they look gorgeous, but when I try and rinse the vinegar out of the roving, the blues and yellows run out, leaving hot pink.

I tried overdyeing, and using longer and longer cook times with more and more vinegar to get it to stick. The result? I turned portions of the roving into rubber. No, really, you pull on it and it stretches and snaps back. I'm about ready to slit my wrists over this stuff! I've never had this problem with any other protein fiber, using exactly the same methods.
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mooshie
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2008 02:41:29 PM »

I'm not sure what the right answer is, but I'm having a problem dyeing soysilk too.  I used acid dyes in the microwave, and only part of the fiber took any color at all.  the rest of it was still the natural color.  Sad  so I don't know if this helps you at all, but you're not the only one having trouble dyeing this stuff. 
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Miss Violaceous
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2008 03:32:37 PM »

The answer I got from a fellow Craftster was that soysilk needs procion dyes rather than acid dyes because of something on the cellular level. I have procion dyes around here but haven't had a chance to try it yet.
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mooshie
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2008 09:01:46 AM »

well, I guess I could try the procion dyes I have too to see if that works any better.  I've just been told that because it's so high in protien that acid dyes would be best.  can't hurt to try though huh?
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Miss Violaceous
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2008 09:49:30 AM »

Lots of places recommend that, but I tried so hard with that soysilk and it was NEVER colorfast. As the fiber would dye, the mere process of evaporation of the remaining water on the fiber would draw out the color, so if you look at the dried hank of roving the dye is all on the outside edges. And that's after setting it multiple times at different levels of acidity and heat, for longer and longer periods of time. Until it turned into soy rubber.
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something_wierd
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2008 06:00:03 PM »

Soysilk is cellulose fiber, no?  You need to use a reactive dye.  Soy may be high in protein, but I'm pretty sure that there is much more cellulose (component of the cell wall).  Acid dyes, like Wiltons + acetic acid (vinegar) work with proteins like wool and silk.
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Polymer Clay Challenge #2 has a winner, RobbinZombie!  her entry was The Kraken  She will receive a prize from Persephone Rose!
Miss Violaceous
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2008 06:10:18 PM »

Soysilk is cellulose fiber, no?  You need to use a reactive dye.  Soy may be high in protein, but I'm pretty sure that there is much more cellulose (component of the cell wall).  Acid dyes, like Wiltons + acetic acid (vinegar) work with proteins like wool and silk.

We just discussed procion dyes (which are fiber reactive dyes for cellulose fibers) upthread a ways. I understand what acid dyes are good for and what cellulose dyes are good for, but until I actually tried it all the different sources I looked at suggested acid dyes for soysilk. Elann.com just released some undyed soysilk yarn and recommended acid dyes for it. I wonder if they actually tried the products before making the suggestion.
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something_wierd
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2008 06:16:17 PM »

Elann.com just released some undyed soysilk yarn and recommended acid dyes for it. I wonder if they actually tried the products before making the suggestion.

I wonder if they thought of acid dye because of the word "silk" in it.  Kind of misleading, eh?  I would hope that companies would test their products, but that would cut into their profits.  (not significantly or anything, but you know how businesses can be Undecided)  God forbid they do some testing so they can give their customers accurate information. Wink
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Polymer Clay Challenge #2 has a winner, RobbinZombie!  her entry was The Kraken  She will receive a prize from Persephone Rose!
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