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Topic: broke as heck, ramen recipes?  (Read 7093 times)
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Bastelmutti
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2008 12:05:26 PM »

I agree with the others about rice, beans, noodles, potatoes, etc. We eat the following two meals about once a week each:

World's easiest tomato sauce recipe - simmer a lg. can of crushed tomatoes with a whole peeled onion (I cut it in half) for about 10 minutes. Any more time, and it will be bitter. Finish with salt, pepper and butter. You can even leave out the butter or get fancy with basil and oregano if you want. Sounds strange, but it's great. Serve with pasta. If you buy Barilla Plus (about $2.39 per box, less on sale), it's even got protein in it.

Although home-cooked dried beans are cheaper, even a can of beans can be had for $0.69 or so - add some tortillas and whatever cheese or toppings you might have on hand for an inexpensive meal.

Eggs are also a cheap source of protein. The less processed food you eat, the more you can stretch your budget. Buy fruit and vegetables in season and freeze anything you can't use up right away.

This site might also provide some inspiration:
http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/index.htm
All of the recipes are not my style necessarily, but she's got good ideas in there + some emergency budget menus for $45/wk. and $70/wk. for a family of 4 - so it can be done!

Good luck and let us know what you come up with!
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« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2008 03:17:19 PM »

Adding frozen veggies to ramen was always my favorite...I lived on that weeks at a time.

Also, the cheap-y shells and white cheddar with a (drained) can of peas and a (drained) can of tuna goes a really long way.  We fed four people (or me, four times) on that more than once.  Also, if you get a package of ground turkey (cheaper than beef), some cans of beans, corn, or other veggies of your choice, a small can of tomato sauce (actual tomato sauce, not spaghetti sauce) and some McCormick's chili seasoning, all that cooked down together (brown the meat first) will last one person more than a week of dinners.  I still do this, in my slow cooker.  I can usually squeeze six meals out of this, for less than $5.  I use two kinds of beans, though.  A slightly more expensive, but a lot more filling, is chicken and rice.  If you can catch boneless skinless chicken on sale (thighs are cheapest), and let it cook in the slow cooker with two cans of chicken gravy, and two cans of cream of chicken soup with herbs, you can serve it over rice, and it's unbelievably filling.  This, too, will last all week (or longer; if you shred the chicken after it's cooked, it tends to last longer...you can portion it better).  My goal, when it comes to cheap meal planning, is to be able to spend no more than $10 on a meal that will feed at least one of us all week.

Oh, also, cottage cheese is relatively cheap, very yummy, and unbelievably filling for breakfast, if you like it.
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« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2008 07:30:40 PM »

Leaving out the seasoning packet cuts down on a lot of the bad stuff in ramen; just throw the packet away!  Then you can use the noodles in pretty much anything---make a cheap veggie stirfry, cook them with some scrambled eggs, throw on some cheap tomato sauce or jarred alfredo...
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« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2008 07:32:54 PM »

I used to buy ramen by the case when I was a poor student, between that and white cheddar no-name mac and cheese....I survived as a student.  I used to add tuna to everything.

My fav recipe was
mac and cheese (made as per the box...or just with water when butter was a luxury item)
can of mushroom soup
tuna

Mix it up - throw it in a oven proof dish and voila....instant tuna casserole Cheesy

When I was little one of my favorite meals my mom would cook would be "macaroni and cheese, tuna fish, and peas" - a bit wordy but that's what we called it and I loved it!  She would make two boxes of cheap mac & cheese adding peas to the pasta while boiling.  Then she would drain that and put the milk, cheese powder, a can of cream of mushroom soup, and a can of tuna.  Delish and definitley not healthy! Ahh... memories.
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crazy wazy
« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2008 10:06:38 PM »

I love instant ramen! Although I agree, it's not very healthy so I eat it occasionally.

Along with the potato idea, you can always make gnocchi! (Potato based pasta). I think it's just cooked potato mashed and mixed with some flour. You can also relieve stress by pounding the potato.
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SuzukiBeane33
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2008 07:43:22 AM »

Yup, potatoes, eggs, and chickpeas are definitely on my top list of filling, cheap, yummy foods.  You can just soak a whole pot of chickpeas and leave it in the fridge for the week.  They're great to eat plain or to toss into anything for some added 'meatiness.'

I splurge a little on sesame oil (nothing fancy, just a big tin of it), olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and black peppercorns.  A little bit of each goes a really long way, and it makes even the simplest potato or hard boiled egg taste like it was cooked in a professional kitchen. 
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« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2008 01:48:31 PM »

i like to make up a thing of noodles with a chicken stock cube, sprinkle in a teaspoon of chilli powder, whatever other herbs i have around, lots of ground black pepper, cut up hot dogs into little bits and add veggies of some kind (normally mushrooms, cos i loooove mushrooms) either fresh or frozen.  the end result is a fairly substantial spicy soup like dish which i can eat for days.  its so easy and cheap, both of which are great for a post grad student with little time and money!
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MizMosa
« Reply #27 on: June 27, 2008 07:31:18 AM »

I second (third? fourth?) the rice and beans!

I like to use this recipe (with a few alterations) to make spanish rice:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Spanish-Rice-II/Detail.aspx

I cut back a little on the oil and use chicken broth instead of water.  This goes well with beans (I saute a little onion and garlic first, and then add a drained can of pinto or kidney beans and just let them heat through).  It re-heats well, is super filling, and feeds me for 3 or 4 lunches.

I read http://cheaphealthygood.blogspot.com/ pretty much daily.  She has lots of  recipes and tips on saving money on food.

Good luck!
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momma2many
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2008 06:34:08 PM »

In Korea the ramen is spicy and untill walmart started carrying the nong shim raman I would take the beef raman cook as usual throw some red pepper in and top with cheese.  mmmm good wont touch the regular stuff anymore. 
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« Reply #29 on: July 12, 2008 05:42:07 PM »

opheliapoe - I used to eat a ton of that stir-fry with fako crab. it is SO good! Also, if you can get a handful of nuts (cashew or pistashio) it is pure heaven.
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