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Topic: clown salth dough garland  (Read 3222 times)
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ostera15
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2010 02:59:15 PM »

Great work on the clowns! I you hadn't posted that they were salt dough I never would have guessed.
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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2010 12:46:47 AM »

This is so cute! I used to make everything out of salt dough since I had no money for materials, I even made a doll's face and hands.
I made that, too. The only problem with salt dough is that it can decay in time. I made a sailor girl for my dad years ago and it fell into pieces though I fied it well and varnished it... But for not so eternal stuff it's great and really really cheap.

bethieB, give salt dough another chance, though - it doesn't have to be messy at all (if it doesn't involve small kids Wink). I don't fear clowns but they just aren't funny to me - not my style of humor, I guess... but my dad really hates them so it's probably an ongoing thing in generations Grin

alwaysinmyroom, if you want your dough to crack make it a bit stiffer than usual and put it on the top of heating device.
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« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2010 07:28:06 AM »

uhm- I still have salt dough Christmas ornaments that I made 45 years ago...I drag them out each Christmas to hang...they have darkened a bit, but they are still hard as rocks and in pretty decent shape...not sure what my parents used to cover them, but it looks like it might be shellac (which would also explain the darkening/yellowing)...

I have an old recipe I found in one of my craft books, so I am definitely going to try this again!!!
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« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2010 10:28:28 AM »

uhm- I still have salt dough Christmas ornaments that I made 45 years ago...I drag them out each Christmas to hang...they have darkened a bit, but they are still hard as rocks and in pretty decent shape...not sure what my parents used to cover them, but it looks like it might be shellac (which would also explain the darkening/yellowing)...

I have an old recipe I found in one of my craft books, so I am definitely going to try this again!!!
I made a plaque out of salt dough for a craft class in middle school and the teacher gave it a coat of wood varnish and it yellowed but it has not broken or craked
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« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2010 10:54:50 AM »

It must be the same thing as the stuff on my wooden doors--the color is the same--I bet it was wood varnish!  Is your plaque still glossy?  My ornaments are... Cheesy
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« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2010 10:59:35 AM »

Thanks for the info about other air-dry clays.  I've hardly used them at all but have heard and researched a fair amount about them.  (And I definitely won't be writing another online "encyclopedia" about air-dry clays!  Shocked  The one on polymer clay was a humongous undertaking --now more than 1800 pages long-- and working all day every day for years wasn't even enough. <tired>  I do have a little info about air-dry clays at glassattic though, under the non-polymer clay sections.)

About the bread clay, I was interested to hear you say the recipe was for stale bread... I had always assumed it was for fresh bread (white, without the crusts) since I'd thought that would make it *very* smooth.  Will try to remember to check out some recipes though since that factor would be important.

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Thank you for the answer to put this kind of things into pc board. ... I didn't know where to put it - it sure isn't polymer clay but it isn't pottery either. I'll put it into pc until we get a new board

I don't think that will happen, but I do think many people new to the "clay" boards are confused when they come here and see the board as being "Pottery, Ceramics, Polymer Clay" if they're not already familiar with the various types of "clay."  
I don't understand the difference between Pottery and Ceramics clays myself, though I'd guess that the ceramic clay would be a little more refined version of plain clay, and fired at a higher temp??
A lot of people don't even know what polymer clay is too (though that's finally changing!), or the very important differences between the various types of clay and how they can (and can't) be used.

(Seems like a better name for the whole board would have been just "Clay" like many of the other simple board names--Clothing, Glass Crafts, Cooking, Knitting, Quilting, etc.
The sub-boards could then have been pottery/ceramics, polymer clay, and air-dry clay (which could also include "earth" clays that are just left to air-dry and not fired in a kiln?, as well as definitely the newish "cold porcelain" clays so popular with crafters in East Asia and other places now.
Not sure where epoxy clays would fit into that, though again most Craftsters don't seem to be aware of it.  
And then there is true "modeling clay" or plasticine, which is an entirely different clay from all the others too... but at least there aren't many little-kids or animators here at Craftster who might be using those!)

Quote
I also added paints or spices INTO the clays and got some interesting resluts with good review by the readers (in a small local magasine - sadly the firm got split and they stoped publishing it ).

Cool.  Do you have any pics of the spices?
Various things can be used to color polymer clay too, and particulate things (herbs, glitters, sand, dirt, etc) are also quite fun to mix into the translucent polymer clays (or into tinted translucents) to simulate stone or just to get all kinds of other effects:
(particulate inclusions) http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/inclusions.htm

Btw, I'm surprised that your salt dough item crumbled if you sealed it really well.  Usually crumbling is what happens when there isn't sufficient sealer used... or perhaps you had a tiny opening around a wire hanger or even joined parts, etc., where over time moisture or critters got access to the inside?

As for expense, polymer clay is more expensive than some of the air-dry clays (but not really good ones like Makins or Hearty or Creative Paperclay, I don't think), but there are ways to either buy the clays more cheaply (online, sales, using scrap clay, etc.), or to make things that don't need as much clay (using armatures of other materials underneath or completely enclosed inside, like scrunched aluminum foil, wood shapes, eggshells, glass or metal containers, etc which is called "covering" in some situations, or by making larger items hollow ...or just by making smaller items like miniatures, jewelry, etc.).  
Here are some posts I wrote awhile back about doing polymer clay "cheaply" if you want to check them out--some overlap:
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=155163.msg1548395#msg1548395
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=73664.msg1638472#msg1638472
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=177119.msg1833985#msg1833985
And of course there are pages at my site with lots more info on those things Cheesy ...here are a few:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/supplysources.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm (plus separate pgs on covering eggs, pens & tiny bottles as well)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/armatures-perm.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/beads.htm ...click on Hollow Beads

Diane B.



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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
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« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2010 11:10:32 AM »

Quote
I made a plaque out of salt dough for a craft class in middle school and the teacher gave it a coat of wood varnish and it yellowed but it has not broken or craked

maria isabel, the reason your sealer yellowed is probably because many wood finishes aren't UV-resistant (they can also yellow from heat).  

Don't know which kind of the various wood finishes your teacher used though, or how thick the coat(s) were, or how the plaque was stored, which could all make a difference to the final strength, look, etc.  For example, some wood finishes are petroleum-solvent-based, some are water-based... some are (clear) polyurethanes, some aren't... some are Gloss, some are Satin or Matte... etc.  
My favorite is a brand of polyurethane named Varathane (Indoor, Gloss version) since it's one of the UV-resistant ones and also has an "interpenetrating network--IPN" which helps it get down into surfaces even better... I use mine mostly on polymer clay, but have also used it on unfinished wood furniture occasionally.

Many other sealers that are clear or dry clear (like thinned permanent white glues, decoupage mediums, acrylic mediums, etc) that can be used to seal salt dough items are also not UV-resistant, and are usually more susceptible to scratching or later cloudiness from humidity than polyurethanes--they're really tough.

Diane B.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2010 11:12:19 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
veri
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2010 11:21:59 AM »

uhm- I still have salt dough Christmas ornaments that I made 45 years ago...I drag them out each Christmas to hang...they have darkened a bit, but they are still hard as rocks and in pretty decent shape...not sure what my parents used to cover them, but it looks like it might be shellac (which would also explain the darkening/yellowing)...

It probably was shellac - it conserves better than the normal varnish I think because a lot of books recomend it for this use... I only had some water based floor varnish and maby I didn't put enough coats on (I just put 1, I think). And my dad (who got the little sailor girl) lives at the sea side where it's humid - maby that also helped?
And yes, it had a whole for the hook to be hanged... I'll know better next time;) We learn from our mistakes, rihgt?Wink Funny thing - my ornaments that I made from the same batch are still ok - but they are flat and the doll wasn't and they weren't at the sea side;)

I have a hard time finding something like your Future and Flecto Varathan here... We just don't have those. so I have to try our brands how they work by myself.. And some let the moisture in I guess;)

dianeB, thank you for all the links! You can be sure I'll check everything out:) I use armatures for all but the tinyest of miniatures. I don't want to waste clay Wink. I use aluminium foil and wire atmost. If I really need clay body I put scraps in the middle and so on...

I still like the salt dough, though. I don't know why - maby because you can make it the way you want it - stiff, soft,... and because you can bake it to get the nice yellow-brown color? And because it's cheap;) And probably most because it's kids safe - even if they eat it it's no harm so we can do it together and I need not to be worried.

I haven't tried the breadstuff yet - but that book called for stale bread - I'd guess because of moisture that is in the freshly baked. Try both out and let me know;)
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010 11:37:21 AM by veri » THIS ROCKS   Logged
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« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2010 12:36:29 PM »

ARGGGGGGGHHHH... the long reply I wrote to you just got erased before I could post it (when I accidentally used the same tab to navigate to another page). 
That hasn't been a problem for me though since I downloaded Lazarus to "remember" forum posts like that so I could always recover them, BUT I've recently switched to Chrome and obviously the Lazarus was associated with Firefox??

I'll try one more thing to try and recover it, but meanwhile just know that I did discuss a number of things you'd said with ways to get around or find things, etc., etc., etc.!!@#$  And I'll try to write it again once I calm down a little... Angry Cry Cheesy

Diane B.
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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
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Diane B.
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« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2010 10:07:28 AM »

Okay...guess I'm calmed down enough Roll Eyes to write my reply again; just couldn't face it yesterday.  Plus, it turns out that the Lazarus version available for Chrome is still beta and doesn't work yet for forum posts (composing this in my email so can't get evaporated again).


Quote
.. I only had some water based floor varnish and maby I didn't put enough coats on (I just put 1)...my dad lives at the sea side where it's humid...And yes, it had a whole for the hook to be hanged...

It was probably the tiny opening around the hole that did it, even if you used only one (thorough) coating of sealer, and especially since there was so much humidity.  Next time you use salt dough for something that hangs, you might want to flood the opening around any hanger-thingie you use (or all the way down a hole you make if you use a finding that goes all the way through), with the sealer.  That should work under most circumstances.

Quote
I have a hard time finding something like your Future and Flecto Varathan here... We just don't have those. so I have to try our brands how they work by myself.. And some let the moisture in I guess;)

I don't know where you are but you should probably be able to find both types of sealer/finish almost anywhere, even though brand names might be different.
 
Future is manufactured by the S.C. Johnson company and they sell some version of it in many countries, though often with different names than Future... Klear or Klir is one name they often use but there are others. 
You can check out the names the sell it under in different countries on the Finishes page of my site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm ...under Future, the first category is Brands
(Just this year though, the name of the product sold in the U.S. has been changed to "Pledge with Future Shine," so it's possible that that particular product got sold or something, and that the name has also changed outside the U.S.)
There are also other brands of liquid "floor polish" that work the same as Future btw --like the Mop 'N Glo we have in the U.S.

Varathane is just one very good brand of polyurethane, and clear polyurethanes should be available everywhere (in hardware stores, for "sealing bare wood"). 
For polymer clay, the water-based/indoor version is needed, but for air dry clays water-based isn't a requirement. 
Most polyurethanes come in gloss, satin and matte versions but the gloss version of indoor Varathane also has something called IPN (interpenetrating network) that helps it get down into the surface of what it's been applied to even more than other polyurethanes, and it also has UV protection (to prevent later yellowing from light/heat). 

All polyurethanes are tough and "hard" too so they scratch and absorb humidity much less than other clear finishes, and sometimes are even used as a final coat on other finishes. 
For salt dough, probably the most common sealer is thinned-down permanent white glue (or decoupage mediums like ModPodge--same thing), but acrylic mediums can be used too or various other liquids and meltable powders, etc ...again though, those will be less tough than polyurethanes (or than clear fingernail polishes, but those get expensive on larger items).  Two-part epoxy resins can be used as coatings too, but are more fiddly; they're tougher than some other finishes but not as tough as polyurethanes.

Polyurethanes are definitely thicker than the floor polishes so give more protection in that way too if there are later scratches or a lot of wear.  Items can also be dipped into polyurethane as well as having it brushed on (hang, then wick off any drops that form in the first few mintues)...that gives a very thick glossy coating.   

Quote
I still like the salt dough, though. I don't know why - maby because you can make it the way you want it - stiff, soft . . .

Polymer clay can also be various consistencies though --from very soft to much firmer, from sticky to not-sticky at all, etc.  Which characteristics a polymer clay has depends on which brand/line is purchased in the first place, and then also on whether it's been treated after purchase to make it softer or firmer.

For example, the softer brands of polymer clay would be Sculpey, Sculpey III, SuperSculpey, and to a lesser extent FimoSoft... the firmest would be FimoClassic and Kato Polyclay, with Premo and Cernit between the groups. 
The softer clays will be more easily distorted and marked with fingerprints, and won't take as much crisp detail as the firmer ones, and those first three Sculpeys will also be brittle after baking in any areas where they're thin. 
The softer clays can be made a little stiffer though by cooling and/or by "leaching" out some of the oily plasticizer.  The stiffer clays can be made softer by using additives (cooking oil, etc.), or by the warming and stretching created by conditioning the clay or just by warming.
More info on all those softening and firming things here:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Conditioning.htm 

Quote
... and because you can bake it to get the nice yellow-brown color?

That's true, I guess, but polymer clay can easily be made that same color either before baking by mixing in certain colors of oil paints, alcohol inks, various powders, etc., or after baking by using brushed-on chalks and thinned paints (usually acrylics) to create the crustier areas, etc.  And of course, polymer clay can be made virtually any color at all before shaping depending on which colors are mixed into the clay (and whether precolored clays were used instead of just white or translucent clays).
If you want to check out some of the "recipes" for making various kinds of "browns" check out my Color page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/color.htm ...click on Recipes & Combos, then scroll down a bit
...And, there's info on using paint/chalks (and even "canes") to create breads and grain products with two-tone coloring for the darker areas, etc, on the Miniatures page under the Breads section.

Quote
And probably most because it's kids safe - even if they eat it it's no harm so we can do it together and I need not to be worried.

Polymer clay isn't "toxic" in the technical sense of that word.  It's been labeled non-toxic forever by the Arts and Crafts Institute which governs that kind of thing.  (Dogs even eat quantities of it occasionally and suffer no ill effects, except technicolor poop.)
In an over-abundance of caution though, it's recommended not to use polymer clay for anything that will be eaten or drunk from just in case there should be some plastizer that didn't get polymerized in the very center of a piece (insufficient baking).  Again not "toxic," but we all want to be prudent about getting even more "bad" stuff into our bodies over a lifetime than necessary considering all the bad things we take in just by living in a "developed" country (from rugs, furniture, cars, cleaning products, pesticides, you name it).
Recently (also in an over-abundance of caution) the EU created rules about which plastics could be sold in the EU, so all the brands of polymer clay have changed their formulas to reflect those changes so they could be sold in the EU (to children under 3, as a toy).

Quote
And because it's cheap;)

Now that's a point!  Though there are ways to do polymer clay more cheaply too (think I put links to stuff that discuss various ways of doing that, from buying to using, in one of the previous posts).

Diane B.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2010 10:45:59 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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