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Topic: How do I 'fix' a long rise in pants?  (Read 2313 times)
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bcgrote
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Why doesn't evolution work with embroidery kits?


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« on: May 12, 2008 09:23:57 AM »

So I'm short.  My rise is short.  I can take a pair of utra low rise pants, and they hit me just below my natural waist.

I saw "my" brand of pants on eBay marked 18A.  For some braindead reason, I think 18 ankle.  I get the pants, and they are 18 average!  I hem them up, they fit nice, except.... well, as my friend would say, "penis pants!"  The rise is long, and the extra fabric pokes out.

Now, how to fix it?  Can it be fixed?

I usually buy petite pants, but those also have a bit of the same problem, so a fix I can do to all of my pants is appreciated!

Or, how do I pattern a correct rise?  I have a good old Singer 99K, so sewing layers of denim or leather is not a problem!

Thanks!
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2008 10:51:06 AM »

I don't know if I'll explain this well enough but I know there are some really good tailoring tutorials out there (typing from hubbys computer- I have no bookmarks ATM). [dang, can't even get a pic on his computer either!]

The seam that runs up the inside of your legs & through the crotch? that is the one you will be messing with. It's a really hard one to do with traditional pinch & pin methods because of where it is, nobody wants to poke themselves with a pin in the nether regions! I say get some heavy thread & very loosly baste and try on instead of pinning.

In order to make this adjustment you will be lowering the waist by actually making the legs longer, start about 4" to 6" down on this inner leg seam, sew (baste) right along the existing seam up through the crotch gradually arcing up higher than the existing crotch point then narrowing back into the opposite leg. I hope that made sense :/
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bcgrote
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Why doesn't evolution work with embroidery kits?


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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2008 12:24:04 PM »

Yeah, sort of a crescent moon shape?

Hmm... I suppose if I baste the first to get the fit on the average fit pair, I can finalize it after I find the right bit without TOO much unbasting!

On my usual ones, probably once I get the size, I could do them in my sleep, lol!

Thanks, I'll try this method!!  Much easier than the deconstruct the whole crotch thing I saw elsewhere!
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rainbowmeow
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2008 02:07:04 PM »

I've used the method Penlowe described.  It works pretty well, although in my experience, it makes the pant leg tighter.  I usually start the new inseam at the knee and go up, just so I don't get any of those weird fabric bubbles, and the inseam is gradual.  I found that doing this works best when your pants aren't more than 1-2 inches too big in the rise.  Anything more than that hasn't turned out well for me,  but it's a plus if you have a stretchy fabric because altering the rise a significant amount is easier.  Hope that was helpful.
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Eliea
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Proverbs 31:13 "She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands."
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2008 02:12:04 PM »

I have been wondering something similar but I'm not sure I have my terminology right.
Is the "rise" the length of the leg, or the length from the crotch to the waist?
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2008 03:12:38 PM »

Your Rise is actually properly defined as from your navel, down through your crotch & up to your waist in the back.

Yes, it's a crecent moon shape.

Yes, you have to be really careful to not take in the leg, only the crotch.

This is rather difficult on jeans where that seam is the one that is flat felled & triple stitched :/ but pretty easy on any other kind of pants.

The length of the leg is the Inseam Smiley
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Eliea
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2008 03:49:37 PM »

Your Rise is actually properly defined as from your navel, down through your crotch & up to your waist in the back.

Yes, it's a crecent moon shape.

Yes, you have to be really careful to not take in the leg, only the crotch.

This is rather difficult on jeans where that seam is the one that is flat felled & triple stitched :/ but pretty easy on any other kind of pants.

The length of the leg is the Inseam Smiley
Ok that is what I "thought" sort of any way! I was close! I'm going to have to try your tips because I have a pair of dress pants that I love (grey with pin stripes) but the waist is way to high. It goes up way above my belly button and it's jsut not attractive. The waist is actually a bit big too so you have high saggy pants with a baggy waist. The waist I can fix but the rise was a problem. IF you find that link I'd love to see it. I'm a very visual person.
Thanks-bcgrote for asking this question because I wasn't sure how to ask. Smiley I hate looking silly in front of all your wise sewing people.
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2008 07:05:35 AM »

Fixing the rise will affect the way the waist sits, in your case for the better Smiley

I am never, ever offended by straight up sewing questions! No matter how simple they seem. "what is this called?", "what is the name of this technique?", "can this be done on a machine?" are very good questions Smiley

I am often highly offended by the "I want to make this [link to $5000 designer dress] someone give me a free tute/ look up all the patterns for me that I can do with $1/ yard walmart fabric and tell me how to make it just as fabulous"  Roll Eyes I often scream at my computer "do your $%^#ing homework yourself!!" I absolutely refuse to go hunting for patterns or tutes unless it is truly an unusual request/ need.
I give a pass to folks who don't know fashion history the way I do and the thing they are seeking was popular in another era but not currently in a lot of patterns, then I tell them what it's called, when it was popular & point them to a place they can learn more. There are a lot of anime elements people want to cosplay that are plucked from different eras & mixed up in very unique ways.

/rant
/re-rail
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Wildflowers
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« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2008 07:10:28 PM »

The crotch of pants.....it is one of the upside down inside out doesn't seem logical mysterious  fitting techniques.

The only good fix for this problem is to take up the paints at the waist...yes the waist!  And when you have a zipper, etc to contend with it becomes one of those throw your hands in the air unless your really love the pants and want to spend the energy on fixing them.

BTW, zippers can be shortened, and a new style of waist band used to be creative!


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Eliea
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Proverbs 31:13 "She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands."
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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2008 12:39:59 PM »

The crotch of pants.....it is one of the upside down inside out doesn't seem logical mysterious  fitting techniques.

The only good fix for this problem is to take up the paints at the waist...yes the waist!  And when you have a zipper, etc to contend with it becomes one of those throw your hands in the air unless your really love the pants and want to spend the energy on fixing them.

BTW, zippers can be shortened, and a new style of waist band used to be creative!



In my case it's not about the love of the pants. Its about how much money would it cost to buy a new pair I'll have to alter in some other way, vs. spending the time to fix what I have or can get for less than 5.00 at the thrift store. Most of my nice clothes for work are nice brands just either older styles, or not quite the right fit.
Also for me I feel better knowing I've fixed something that would have been thrown away by most other people. 
I totally forgot about this issue with the presents I've been hard at work on. I plan to try to make a pants mannequin for myself to try them onto as I work but have yet to go get the stuff to do that. Sad
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