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Topic: Superwash wools -- necessary?  (Read 540 times)
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« on: March 16, 2008 09:25:36 PM »

I'm trying to sort out a lot of info, and I'm confused. My dye class instructor urged us to use superwash yarns because they take the yarn better. I didn't and could see the difference. But since it seems most yarns are not superwash, is this what most people do? I mean, how do they dye all those nonsuperwash wool yarns?

Can you make something superwash yourself?
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2008 08:49:23 AM »

Superwash is a chemical process in which the wool is treated romoving "scales" which allow wool to felt. Most sock yarn is superwash, but many yarn are not. Superwash wool will take dye faster and darker but this is not always better. If you are trying fur subtle colors or slight gradations superwash is not reccomended. If you are dying regular wool just give is a soak in some water/vinegar solution so it takes the dye better. Another advantage of superwash is that it will not felt during the dye process.
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2008 10:03:54 AM »

Thanks for your reply. I will try the vinegar soak next time instead of plain water.
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2008 10:22:22 AM »

Just make sure it's like 5 parts water to one part vinegar.
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« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2008 10:08:17 AM »

The vinegar acts as a mordant.

You can use other things for mordant also to change the final color of the dye.

I believe the original meaning of mordant is 'to bite'.

 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2008 10:09:07 AM by mullerslanefarm » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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