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Topic: CP and lye?  (Read 858 times)
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urbanhula
« on: January 13, 2008 05:14:25 PM »

hi guys,
might be a stupid question but... is there any way to make cold process soaps without the lye?
thanks  Grin
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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2008 08:34:06 PM »

no, lye is what makes the soap (the process is called saponification) from the fats and oils in the mixture
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2008 08:27:23 AM »

If you are still too nervous to try cold process, but you want another choice other than melt and pour, you might want to look into hand milling. It is pretty labor intensive, but you can make gorgeous, all natural soaps, without having to start from scratch.

Basically, hand milling is taking already made CP(cold process) or HP(hot process) soap, shredding it, melting it with water, and remolding it. (You can't use Melt and Pour Base or commercially made soap for this, it has to be basic soap, like handmade soap)

This is also called "re-batching", and is often used by CP soap makers to save a batch that didn't turn out quite right. You can purchase re-batch or hand mill base from some suppliers, or contact a fellow soap maker and see if they'll make you a few pounds of unscented, basic soap. A soap maker will probably charge less per pound, and you'll be spreading the crafty love to another soap maker.

You can find directions on hand milling on this thread:
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=179369.0

There are also some books out there full of hand milling recipes. Check your library for "The Complete Soapmaker" by Norma Coney. That's a good one.
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mkohut
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2008 11:14:01 PM »

You can get vegetable based fats to use in soap from a craft store.  Also, cocoa butter can thicken the soaps.
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« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2008 11:59:07 PM »

You can get vegetable based fats to use in soap from a craft store.  Also, cocoa butter can thicken the soaps.
that is true, but she will still need the lye to create the chemical reaction if she starts from scratch

but the handmilling is a neat option, i might try that, its like m&p, with a few added steps
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2008 06:38:23 PM »



This is also called "re-batching", and is often used by CP soap makers to save a batch that didn't turn out quite right. You can purchase re-batch or hand mill base from some suppliers, or contact a fellow soap maker and see if they'll make you a few pounds of unscented, basic soap. A soap maker will probably charge less per pound, and you'll be spreading the crafty love to another soap maker.



Wow, you just reminded me of tons of shreds I have put away for use in "confetti" soap. I bevel my soaps and hate to throw away shreds. Maybe I should try swapping them!
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2008 09:38:44 AM »

That's not a bad idea! Considering how expensive re-batch base can be.
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CraftieMommie
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2008 05:09:00 AM »

At this point, I'm thinking that Hand Milling is the way I plan to go also. Is it really as bad as all the horror stories that are out there? I've done the melt and pour, and read the re-batching instructions, and while it may seem to be a bit of a pain, it really doesn't come off as that difficult to me. Or am I just naive?
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Euphony
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2008 10:25:48 AM »

At this point, I'm thinking that Hand Milling is the way I plan to go also. Is it really as bad as all the horror stories that are out there? I've done the melt and pour, and read the re-batching instructions, and while it may seem to be a bit of a pain, it really doesn't come off as that difficult to me. Or am I just naive?
I don't think it's that difficult per say - but personally I've done it once and won't do it again.  The finished product is less than attractive to say the least and I'm sure I'm just not patient enough with it - I'm not a fan.  Some people love it.  I think it's a great way to go if you don't want to make the soap from scratch, but you don't want to do melt & pour.
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