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Topic: Does anyone understand these pants???  (Read 769 times)
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dbh2ppa
« on: December 29, 2007 12:40:03 AM »

I was looking at the site this thread talk about (Which, btw, has some pretty interesting clothes)... and I stumbled across these pants and I would so love to copy those (and I mean I would REALLY love to copy those)... but I have no idea whatsoever as to how to go about it :S... does anyone around here understand how these pants are constructed?Huh Any reference to a similar pattern? Any vague idea as to how you could achieve that efect? anything?? (BTW, I can draft patterns for simple pants, and I'm pretty quick at understanding, so ANY kind of idea will do  Wink)

The page says they're "変形型ワイドパンツ" Which, according to google, would roughly translate into "Deformation-inch wide pants". That description does not help me at all  Sad But maybe it means something to one of you wiser crafters ^.^

(Sorry I didn't post an image, but I can't extract the image from the site for some weird reason :S)

Thanks in advance ^^

*EDIT*
Finally managed to extract the images ^^
« Last Edit: December 29, 2007 02:30:29 PM by dbh2ppa » THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Made a cross from knitting needles,
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2007 06:49:17 AM »

no picture in your link :/
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dbh2ppa
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2007 02:22:19 PM »

There, it's fixed ^^ Thanks for pointing that out.
(In case it doesn't work again, they're the pants on the second page of the "Sixh." section of the website, the ones called "Sixh.変形型ワイドパンツ")
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"Made a cross from knitting needles,
made a grave from hoover bags
specially for the woman in the wall"
(The beautiful south - The woman in the wall)
Plastic_Venus
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2007 06:26:23 AM »

I fixed the images exposure to show what they actually look like Tongue
I would love to take this to my lecturers next year and ask them(all senior pattern makers in the industry) how they would do it.
I see panels which makes me think there could be bias cutting in it or simply a lining where the extra 'vent' of fabric is being held in and i would suggest the hem attached too like a bubble skirt.

When i look at them i would think to begin with a block pant pattern, slash the leg through twice and swing out the side seam to probably level with the waistband to increase the volume.
Think like two 1/4 circle skirts separated to make two legs. Fabric will make them sit like that, something with a starchy feel. It may take many toiles(mock-ups) to get the proportions right too.
You're a brave person!  Cheesy


« Last Edit: December 30, 2007 06:28:02 AM by Plastic_Venus » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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I know, I know.
Carillia
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2007 12:55:58 PM »

Have a look at this link on how to adapt a sloper for a similar effect on skirts. At least I think it looks somewhat alike. Wink It shouldn't be too hard to do the same thing on a trouser sloper by adding extra width to the inseam and enlogating the side seam to a triangular shape. And as Plastic_Venus pointed out, there is bias cutting - indicated by the arrowns in the link above.

Would love to see the results on this one, good luck!
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dbh2ppa
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2007 02:40:46 PM »

I fixed the images exposure to show what they actually look like Tongue
I would love to take this to my lecturers next year and ask them(all senior pattern makers in the industry) how they would do it.
I see panels which makes me think there could be bias cutting in it or simply a lining where the extra 'vent' of fabric is being held in and i would suggest the hem attached too like a bubble skirt.

When i look at them i would think to begin with a block pant pattern, slash the leg through twice and swing out the side seam to probably level with the waistband to increase the volume.
Think like two 1/4 circle skirts separated to make two legs. Fabric will make them sit like that, something with a starchy feel. It may take many toiles(mock-ups) to get the proportions right too.
You're a brave person!  Cheesy

Thank you, so much!! I hadn't thought of fixing the exposure to be able to really look at it ^^
A couple of question, if you don't mind (I'm no good at sewing terminology in english Tongue)
1) What is bias cutting? (Is it just cutting on the bias or something else, and what does it have to do with it having panels)
2) How exactly is the hem a bubble skirt? I've always wondered ^^

Have a look at this link on how to adapt a sloper for a similar effect on skirts. At least I think it looks somewhat alike. Wink It shouldn't be too hard to do the same thing on a trouser sloper by adding extra width to the inseam and enlogating the side seam to a triangular shape. And as Plastic_Venus pointed out, there is bias cutting - indicated by the arrowns in the link above.

Would love to see the results on this one, good luck!

Thanks a lot, the link really made  it easier to understand. ^^ I'll make sure to post as soon as I manage to make a decent toile.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Made a cross from knitting needles,
made a grave from hoover bags
specially for the woman in the wall"
(The beautiful south - The woman in the wall)
Plastic_Venus
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2008 04:38:08 PM »

dbh2ppa,
Bias cutting is just cutting it on the bias. Thats how you make a cowl neck for example. Fabric on the bias has stretch and with drape or hang with a curve but unless you understand it fully im not sure you would need to worry about it with these it was just something i noticed.

Bubble skirts are easy the lining is shorter than the outer skirt and the outer one is attached to the lining therefor pulling up the outisde hem of the fabric and making a bubble.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

I know, the past will catch you up as you run faster,
I know, I know.
dbh2ppa
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2008 08:10:34 PM »

Thanks Plastic_Venus ^.^
I've already done a few toiles (namely four), they came out ok, but not exactly right Sad...  And I hate making toiles (Being that I don't own a sewing machine and I'm sewing them by hand), but I'm getting closer, I believe ^^
Thanks for the help ^^
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Made a cross from knitting needles,
made a grave from hoover bags
specially for the woman in the wall"
(The beautiful south - The woman in the wall)
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