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Topic: sewing machine hasn't been used in over 10 yrs...  (Read 1178 times)
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CrochetAdikt
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« on: December 20, 2007 03:03:48 PM »

hi all,
  i kind of inheirited a sewing machine from my grandma except my aunt got it first and then decided she didn't want it so then i got it. sloppy seconds but its a sewing machine at least right? anyways, i was told i need to oil it b/f i turn it on or it might jam up. question is, where do i oil it at? are there certain areas that need to be oiled frequently? or just once and it'll be fine? i've always just used my moms sewing machine so i've never had to really take care of one. any help or suggestions would be great. thanx!
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mystico_tala
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2007 05:31:22 PM »

If it hasn't been used in a long time it might be best to take it in to a shop for an actual cleaning.  Someone else might be able to help you on the oil thing, I don't have a clue.  Seeing as how my machine is 60 years old, I probably should know!
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deathslilsister
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2007 06:08:01 PM »

I second taking it to a repair shop for a good cleaning and tune-up; my grandmother gave me her old machine a couple of years ago, and it needed a new belt and some other minor repairs before I could start sewing.  Once it's been tuned-up professionally, it is a good idea to keep it oiled if you do a lot of sewing.  If you can find a copy of the machine manual (the big machine companies are very good about stocking manuals to sell, and there are lots of scans of manuals available online), it will usually have a diagram of the points that need to be oiled for that particular machine.
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CrochetAdikt
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2007 09:04:09 PM »

ok thanks guys. there's a machine shop down the road from me so if i can find it and its reasonable, i'll take it in. it may be better to just buy a new one for 100 bucks. we'll see. thanks again.
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localtalent
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2007 04:21:28 PM »

ok thanks guys. there's a machine shop down the road from me so if i can find it and its reasonable, i'll take it in. it may be better to just buy a new one for 100 bucks. we'll see. thanks again.

What make and model of machine? 

A tuneup will likely cost you $60-$70.  Don't be fooled by this, though - it's quite likely that your older machine is worth well more than that.  The cheaper machines have mostly plastic internals and will not last as long.  My machine is a Bernina that my mom bought new in '72 - cost me $140 to get it up and running, due to a short in the motor and one shop not doing a good job repairing it.  Worth every penny, the thing is built like a tank.  Older machines were generally better constructed, because they were meant to be repaired - not disposed of like most modern appliances.

And wouldn't you want to sew on your grandmother's machine?  It's been in the family for three generations and you're giving it new life - how awesome is that?
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2007 08:14:09 PM »

Quote
it may be better to just buy a new one for 100 bucks
as she said above, I'll reiterate with proper emphasis:
HELL NO on trading it in for a new cheap machine!

If someone gave you a 5 year old Mercedez M class sedan that hadn't been driven in a while would you take it to a shop for a tune up? or trade it in on a new Kia?

Old sewing machines are worth their weight in gold- and the old ones tend to be heavy!

$60- $70 is really high for my area, I can get a tune up & oil for $45- $55, YMMV.
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CrochetAdikt
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2007 10:24:03 PM »

yeah i understand what you guys mean about the wanting to go with the old machines b/c they're more heavy duty. what i really want is for my mom to fix up the machine i learned how to sew on b/c thats the one i really really want. my grandma died when i was 4 so i never grew up knowing her so actually having her machine doesn't really mean a whole lot to me, there's not much sentimental value, its just that its a decent machine. i know that may sound awful to some people but from what i've heard she didn't like our family or my mother much anyways. i'm expecting my machine to cost at least 75 to fix since i live in colorado. everything here is expensive except gasoline. a gallon of milk costs more than gas here. my boyfriend thinks he can "fix" it up and oil it himself b/c i think i know where the instruction manual is but i think when he's gone for work i'm going to take it in and have them do it properly Smiley
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2007 06:47:58 AM »

Quote
my boyfriend thinks he can "fix" it up and oil it himself b/c i think i know where the instruction manual is

This isn't as dangerous as it sounds Smiley If he works on cars or motorcycles at all I'd trust him with a sewing machine. They are pretty simple. Most of cleaning up a sewing machine is just that: q-tips & oil. My main concern about ten years unused is any rubber or leather belts or gaskets may have gotten brittle, a repair shop will have replacements on hand.
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CrochetAdikt
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« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2007 11:23:29 AM »

alright, i guess i'll trust him with it. are the belts and such easy to get to to check and see how they are?
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2007 12:54:07 PM »

That really depends on the machine, some housings are a couple screws & lift off no sweat, some take an act of congress....the replacement parts themselves tend to be pretty cheap, but harder to find unless you go through a sewing machine shop. Most online places you can order have minimum order priced or quantites that are not solo repair friendly :/
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