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Topic: Sewing machines, a buyers guide  (Read 44049 times)
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Aislynn
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« Reply #70 on: September 04, 2010 06:47:20 PM »

Yup!  The bobbin itself is plastic, but that's pretty typical nowadays.  But everything else is metal.

ETA:  The case is plastic.  Like the actual shell of the machine.  But the innards are metal.  That's what I meant!
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010 07:19:37 PM by Aislynn » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #71 on: September 04, 2010 06:58:57 PM »

Aha...that's probably it.  I'm thinking the mechanical machines are made sturdier than the computerized ones!  My bobbin case was soft, crappy plastic with some metal parts.  This is so discouraging.  Now I wait for my refund and decide how to spend it so I actually end up with a sewing machine I can...hey here's a concept...SEW ON!  Yeesh!
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« Reply #72 on: October 13, 2010 04:26:28 PM »

This topic has been super helpful! Thanks everyone for your input. Smiley Right now I'm just starting to learn to sew on a machine and the one i'm using is borrowed from my Aunt. It's an old White brand machine and as far as I can tell the model number is 2221 if that means anything to anyone. I'm thinking of asking my parents for a machine for Christmas that way when I leave for school next year (i'm a first year college student but i'm staying with family while going to a community college close by, next year i'm transferring to a 4 year uni and will be living on campus in a dorm) i'll have my own to take with me. I'm definitely going to use the information i've gotten from here to help me make my decision on what to purchase.
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niteRNcrafter
« Reply #73 on: November 08, 2010 05:15:33 PM »

I'm just starting out in the sewing world and would like to buy a good machine (not too cheap but obviously not the top of the line).  I went to Joann fabrics to ask about machines since there is a dizzying amount of info on reviews that I don't even understand.  I ultimately want to make clothing, purses and crafts like decorative things around the house (including felt or canvas possibly).  The lady at the store was not much of a help, she told me to get a viking, not a singer because viking is the only one that can go through "tough fabric".  Also that singer inside parts were made of plastic and not metal like viking.

I just want to get a machine that is not too simple but would be durable and allow for many different types of projects....does that exist?!
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« Reply #74 on: November 26, 2010 04:44:31 AM »

... The lady at the store was not much of a help, she told me to get a viking, not a singer because viking is the only one that can go through "tough fabric".  Also that singer inside parts were made of plastic and not metal like viking.

I just want to get a machine that is not too simple but would be durable and allow for many different types of projects....does that exist?!

I just finished sewing my first pair of jeans last night, and my (new-to-me) vintage Brother Pacesetter was doing a good job with multiple layers of denim until I hit the back of the waistband where the semi-flat-felled seams are.  No dice - no amount of coaxing and hand cranking could get that needle through the seams.  So I switched back to my Janome JS1022, which I would classify as a full-featured entry level model.  It handled those seams like butter.  Seriously.   Cheesy

So I would say that my Janome would fall in the category you mentioned.  It has a bunch of features and stitches, a one-step button hole function, and enough power to sew stuff that many machines can't.  But this "entry level" machine probably costs almost twice as much as a cheap singer at wal-mart, so you do get what you pay for.  The best shops will let you try different models of sewing machines before you buy.  My local sewing machine shop let me test the Janome with multiple layers of tough denim, and that's what sold me on it.
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mrkaykay
« Reply #75 on: January 18, 2011 05:56:37 AM »

most confusing
so from this topic ive gathered that the best options are either :

buy and old metal machine cheap as they tend to last for less money

or buy a new machine but only if its not a budget one 200 plus?Huh
because cheap new machines suck?

where does the janome qxl605 fit in too expensive or too cheap for what it is ?? i cant find any reviews online but i you-tubed it and a video of it looks good enough for what i want.




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Aislynn
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« Reply #76 on: January 18, 2011 06:27:20 AM »

mrkaykay, the absolute best thing you can do is to go to a store in your town and ask to try out the machines that you're interested in.  You should even be able to do this in fabric stores which sell machines, in addition to the more specialized dealers.  Bring several kinds of your own fabric to use, and see what you like about each one.  The one thing I've learned is that you're always going to get conflicting reviews on the internet, because everyone looks for different things and has their own standards by which to judge.  And someone who sews formalwear is going to have different needs from someone who sews stuffies, who's going to have different needs again from someone who quilts.  As long as your machine meets your needs, it's the right machine for you.  And budget is one of those needs that no one else can dictate for you.
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« Reply #77 on: April 10, 2011 07:18:44 AM »

My two cents worth regarding entry level machines. 
I bought a Brother LS1217 in 1999 for $100 at Walmart.  It was the cheapest machine they had (it goes forward, backwards and zig-zags), but all I needed at that time was a machine that would sew patches on my uniforms and let me make the occassional pillow.  For the record, I did not sew on it regularly, but in fits and starts.  It took me nearly 12 years to find the limits of the machine - it finally gave out just before Christmas last year.  In the machine's defense, I probably shouldn't have sewn through multiple layers of fleece.  I could probably have it repaired, but I'm looking for something a little more advanced as my needs have changed.

That all being said, I paid less than $10 per year to use that machine.  I do not know if a newer base model Brother machine will hold up the same way, but please do not feel as if a "base machine" is the worst thing that could happen to you.  I learned a lot as a beginning sewer on that machine.  For me personally, I think using a basic manual (v. computerized) machine forced me to learn more about the relationship between the fabric and the machine settings than I would have had I jumped straight to a computerized, top of the line machine.

I also bought a 1950-era Domestic machine second hand last year after reading all the recommendations on vintage machines.  The machine is in really good condition (some small wiring issues, easily fixed).  It came with a ton of feet and accessories and the original manual.  I thought I was in heaven!  Until I realized that a vinatage machine requires more time and patience than I generally have.  The entire threading mechanism is different, the bobbin is a lot more complicated and I have no idea what all those feet are really for.  I'm sure that given enough time, it would be as easy to use as any other machine, but I'm not feeling it.  My experience is unique to be, but it might be something to keep in mind if you are looking for a vintage machine - are you willing to invest the time into it, or are you looking for something that is more "sit and sew" capable?  I'm partial to instant gratification myself. 

As for me, I am now looking at a couple of mid-range Janome's.  I'm not sure I really want to make the leap to a computerized machine, but I would certainly like a machine with a little more "oomph" and some nifty features a base model is lacking.  I have another post out here somewhere in which I said I'd settled first on a Janome Sewist 500, and later decided on a Janome 8077 (the Magnolia without all the flowers), but I haven't pulled the trigger yet.  Knowing me, I'll end up with something completely different in the end.
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nhennessy90
« Reply #78 on: May 02, 2011 09:39:58 PM »

my father is giving me $200 and well i want a sewing machine.

i want one for crafting things like cloth diapers, bags, purses wet bags toddler dress etc

any help?

btw i dont want to spend all 200 but if i must i will

i want a good sewing machine that wont break
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« Reply #79 on: May 10, 2011 02:28:39 PM »

How does the Baby lock brand compare to all the others mentioned?
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