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Topic: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?  (Read 1228 times)
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jenna rose
« on: November 28, 2007 09:33:14 AM »

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« Last Edit: January 29, 2008 01:19:36 AM by jenna rose » THIS ROCKS   Logged
SpottedFrog
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2007 06:25:41 PM »

I actually have a Craftsman from Sears, but it's fully compatible with all Dremel brand bits & doodads. I've had it for more than ten years and acquired a lot of accesories in that time. I don't recall exactly which ones came with it originally but I did get it in a tool box type case with a pull out drawer for allllllll the extras : ) Mine is a variable speed type which I love.

My dad was given a Riobi tool of similar make- he hated it, it was rather wimpy.

If you intend on jewelry & will be doing metal work you want one with higher torqe & horsepower, cordless usually desn't have enough to drill silver. Besides, when working in a small area, like when you do jewelry, a cord isn't too much bother : ) Now getting into nooks on a chair, it can be cumbersome.

Hope that helps.
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naturalcreation
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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2007 03:06:24 AM »

Dremel Multi-Pro with the flex-shaft and a slew of 40-grit cutters here. I love that thing, but it scares me. I'm afraid of flying debris or loose bits when that thing gets to over say 12000 rpm. Big wuss here Smiley
It works very well though! Highly recommended.
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2007 04:30:16 AM »

The Dremel I have is the first one you listed.

I've used it for everything from cutting metal (computer case mods), to wood. It has not let me down once.

The only Dremel I don't recommend is the cordless. It's my understanding that they can sometimes let you down without enough power.

MMmmmmm....power tools!!! Wink
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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2007 01:29:26 AM »

The only Dremel I don't recommend is the cordless. It's my understanding that they can sometimes let you down without enough power.

Definatley get something with a cord. Batterie life is crap and you have about half the power of a plug in model.

My hus band bought the newest biggest one he could find. Its Dremel brand and we have like ever accessory for it and use it for soooooo many things. I love the flex shaft attachment. It is easier to hold than the big main unit so it reduces fatigue if you are using it for long periods of time. It also helps you get into tight places if you need to.
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2008 06:25:38 PM »

So I just got a Dremel Multipro 2855-01 for Christmas and I'm at a complete loss...it doesn't have particularly user friendly instructions and I find the website confusing. Am I just Dremel impaired? I am very familiar with using full sizedpower drills and sanders, but this is making me feel very dumb. I mainly want to be able to drill and sand metal and wood and possibly etch glass. Any suggestions or guidance? What accoutrements should I get?
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SpottedFrog
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2008 06:33:48 PM »

I do a lot of trial & error :/ when I bought most of my bits I had a specific task in mind & bought accordingly...but now all those packages and labels are gone, so I fiddle around.

The sandpaper ones are pretty straight forward, they are sand paper equivalents.

The wire brush type ones I've only used once or twice, but you may have a lot of use for with metals Smiley

The rubbery bits I've never used successfully, or was trying to use them for the wrong thing.

The thin little disks that sorta seem ceramic are the dense cut off wheels, they are great on a lot of things but really brittle, that's why they sell them by the dozen.

Grab an assortment of materials & your goggles & go play Smiley
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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2008 06:56:53 PM »

Thanks, Penlowe. My 13 year old daughter just figured it out for me Roll Eyes and I managed to find my way around the website. I guess I was just so excited at getting it that I let it intimidate me Tongue
Now I can't wait to dig under the snow for some of the tin and copper I left outside to age  Wink
Sorry for all the smileys, but I'm loving the New Year's hats they're wearing today Grin Grin
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« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2008 02:36:42 AM »

If you are working with metal I suggest not just goggles but long sleves and good gloves. Metal spliners are not fun and the peice you are working on can get supper hot from all the friction.

Also make sure you have the whole set of the silver peice that holds the bits. Drill bits are smaller and need a differant adapter than sand paper bits etc. If you don't already have you may also want to get a few good clampy things to hold your stuff steady and free you hands.
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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2008 05:51:57 PM »

I tend to not use gloves in my metal work-I know, I know, you're supposed to, but I have a hard time controlling tin snips,etc...when I wear them. I have a high tolerance for pain, very little vanity about beat up hands and an up-to- date tetanus shot Grin
I was wondering if there are any super-secret ways people use to cool down the tool/metal from high friction?
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