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Topic: continental v.s. English methods?  (Read 2023 times)
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soozeq
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2007 08:12:29 AM »

You found a method to purl that's easy for you. Others have difficulty with it though. But others find it difficult to knit english style while I find it very easy. So it's a very individual thing and everyone needs to figure out which is better for them.
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sue
stripey_cat
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2007 08:37:58 AM »

I'm another one who gets annoyed when everyone says English knitting is slow - my sprint-speed is better than a stitch a second, and I'm (very) slow compared to my grandmother, who could manage 80 or 90 stitches a minute sustained for ages (it was fun to literally watch something like a sock grow under her fingers).  You (OK, I and she) make (made) only the tiniest movements with your index finger to throw the yarn, and then a little flick with your left hand fingers to move the needles into place for the next stitch.  I've tried continental, and my stitches were uneven, my time was a lot slower, and (the thing that convinced me to stop trying to get any better at it) my left wrist siezed up all RSI style from trying to make too many movements at once.  Add in that my left hand is weak and clumsy, and it just isn't the style for me.  If you're left-handed, closer to ambidextrous, or your right hand is prone to RSI, then I think it could work well.
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kmsmaverick
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2007 10:08:15 AM »

i sort of wonder about that too.

i've seen english and continental knitters on knitty gritty, and i have to confess, sometimes i can't really tell which is which- i mean as far as speed is concerned. some english style knitters don't actually throw the yarn the motion is sort of all in one. i imagine stripey cat you might be one of them. Contrast that with my mom, who puts down the right hand needle to throw the yarn. then holds it in place with a left finger and picks up the right needle again- she's a very slow knitter. i think that's really an comparision of a more experienced, and practiced knitter. it really just takes practice with either one. 

make no mistake, my first forrays into continental were just as slow as those into english style. the similarity to the motion of crochet is really the biggest mechanical difference between the two, wouldn't you say?
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dr_marti
« Reply #23 on: November 13, 2007 11:40:40 AM »

I've found continental to be a faster method for me, too (even purling!)  I learned English first, got frustrated, learned to crochet, and then came back to knitting continental style; as others have said, if you have the hang of crochet, continental seems easier.  There are advantages to knowing both, though.  One can be that it gives your muscles some variety; I sometimes switch back and forth to give my hands a break from repetitive motion.  Also, if you're doing colorwork, it can be helpful to hold one strand of each color in each hand and knit one continental, the other English.  But in the end, it comes down to what works best for you!
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kmsmaverick
« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2007 11:53:31 AM »

oh, i just had a wonder- the stitches come out exactly the same don't they?

that must sound very flaky, but i just want to be sure. when i was doing combined, the yarn over, k2togs didn't come out the same as when i did them in proper continental.
so i just want to be sure.
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flaky
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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2007 03:28:57 PM »

Quote
oh, i just had a wonder- the stitches come out exactly the same don't they?

that must sound very flaky, but i just want to be sure. when i was doing combined, the yarn over, k2togs didn't come out the same as when i did them in proper continental.
so i just want to be sure.

well, being *flaky* myself, I would say that yes your stitches should come out exactly the same as long as you are winding the yarn around the needle in the same direction.  It makes no difference which hand wound the yarn around the needle.  You may have just wound the yarn around the opposite way.
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cranberry
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2007 02:27:00 AM »

oh, i just had a wonder- the stitches come out exactly the same don't they?

that must sound very flaky, but i just want to be sure. when i was doing combined, the yarn over, k2togs didn't come out the same as when i did them in proper continental.
so i just want to be sure.

Not for me. I find that when I do continental for knit (and then switch to English for purl) my stitches come out backwards. I have to purl to the back loop if I want my stitches to be even and not twisted.

I do want to attempt an entire cardigan in contintental though (I've done tiny things, like socks and all). I haven't done that before. It should be cool.
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rhythmgrl
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2007 05:00:31 AM »


Not for me. I find that when I do continental for knit (and then switch to English for purl) my stitches come out backwards. I have to purl to the back loop if I want my stitches to be even and not twisted.

I do want to attempt an entire cardigan in contintental though (I've done tiny things, like socks and all). I haven't done that before. It should be cool.

The only reason I can think that your stitches would come out twisted when you purl is that maybe you're knitting through the back look when you use the continental method?  If you're knitting through the front loop, there should be no reason that I can think of that your stitches would come out twisted.
That's such an interesting problem.  Maybe someone else has a better idea!
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soozeq
« Reply #28 on: November 14, 2007 07:29:02 AM »

Wrapping the yarn the other way on a stitch would cause that too.
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sue
mmdm
« Reply #29 on: November 15, 2007 07:20:40 AM »

Wrapping the yarn the other way on a stitch would cause that too.

Yes, that's it. Some continental knitters wrap the yarn the wrong way when purling. A more appropriate wording might be the "nontraditional" way. That will twist the stitch. I often wonder if those aren't the same ones who find purling more difficult, but I don't know. If you wrap the yarn the right, or traditional, way, it will look exactly the same whether you did it Continental or English style.
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