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Topic: Help with quilting a king size quilt  (Read 685 times)
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Ana_Ng
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« on: October 29, 2007 06:08:10 PM »

I really want to make a quilt for my bed, but the thought of quilting a king size quilt in my regular sewing machine makes me want to throw myself off a bridge.  I machine quilted my son's twin size quilt on my machine and it was a nightmare.

Is there some kind of trick to machine quilting that I don't know about?  I have a walking foot, but it doesn't make the quilting any easier. 

Should I think about hand quilting it?  Tying it instead of quilting it?  Sending it to a longarm quilter?  It just seems like cheating to send it to someone else to quilt. 

Anyone have any experience with quilts this large?

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anaximander
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2007 07:29:42 PM »

Baste it a lot. And then, when you think you've basted it enough, baste it MORE.

I've found i actually get more mileage basting like every 4 inches, and then not *rolling* my quilt to get it through the machine, but *scrunching* it. the basting keeps it all still even, and it gives you just that bit more leeway - in all but the exact centre you can squirm it around so not that much is between the needle and the main part of the machine.
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Eowynt
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« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2007 11:41:37 AM »

I mostly make small quilts (mini's to wallhangings), but I made a queen size quilt for my bed a couple of years ago.  The first step is good basting.  My local quilt shop lets you borrow their tables to baste large quilts - not only did they let me use their tables, but their iron and binder clips, too, and they helped me do it - all for free.  I used special safety pins that are designed for basting quilts on the center of the quilt, but I hand basted around the edge.

A couple of other shops around  here also tout the spray on adhesive for basting the quilts.  I have only used the spray a few times - and once again - I did it at the store (this store has an outdoor storage area so it was well ventilated.

As the other post stated, basting makes all the difference.
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KyTriplets
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2007 02:35:36 PM »

Trying to wrestle that much fabric under the arm of a regular sewing machine is quite a feat.  Have you considered using a longarm quilter?  The cost for a basic meander edge to edge would run around $0.02/sq. inch. (comes out to a less than $200 for a typical king size quilt).

This way you could enjoy the creating part of piecing a quilt top and let a longarm quilter manhandle your quilt top.

HTH!
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Ana_Ng
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2007 04:57:13 PM »

Trying to wrestle that much fabric under the arm of a regular sewing machine is quite a feat.  Have you considered using a longarm quilter?  The cost for a basic meander edge to edge would run around $0.02/sq. inch. (comes out to a less than $200 for a typical king size quilt).

This way you could enjoy the creating part of piecing a quilt top and let a longarm quilter manhandle your quilt top.

HTH!

Yes, that is probably what I'll do.  I am 6 months pregnant and the thought of crawling around on the floor to put all the layers together, then basting it, then quilting it is just way more than I can bear.  I would like to have this quilt done by January, so paying someone to do the quilting (who will certainly do a better job than I can) is not a bad idea.  It just feels a little like cheating.  I feel like I have to do it ALL myself, or I didn't really make it.
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anaximander
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2007 05:29:22 PM »

Quote
I feel like I have to do it ALL myself, or I didn't really make it.

Twaddle. Tons of quilters I know get theirs professionally done. What about renting time on the machine? That way YOU did it, but you also have the ability to NOT crawl around on the floor Smiley
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Sansa
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007 01:35:34 PM »

You could do it in sections, depending on the design. I have one where I quilted each block individually now I am joining them. I would suggest larger pieces than that. I have read that Dianne Johnson does hers in quarters. She then gets to quilt four smaller quilts then join them.
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