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Topic: Grafting mixed knit and purl stitches  (Read 1055 times)
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lisascenic
« on: September 22, 2007 09:54:21 PM »



So I'm knitting this sweet scarf, and to keep it symmetrical, I'm knitting it in two pieces.

The thing is that, for some reason, my brain isn't working tonight and I'm forgetting how to deal with grafting live stitches (kitchener) when there is a mixture of knit and purl stitches.

I can't figure out how to deal with the half-stitch offset that you get when you graft.

I know there's a way.  I've grafted plenty of projects, but I can't visualize this tonight. Mary Thomas and Montse Stanley aren't helping, me.  And all the online explanations that I've looked at show plain stockinette, not a mixture.

Will someone take pity on me, and explain this to me in a way that my poor addled brain can comprehend?
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knittinfiasco
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« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2007 11:33:14 PM »

Will the knits line up with knits and purls with purls?

I'd just flip it over and graft as with a knit st--should appear like a purl on the other side.
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Mnemosyne_LA
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2007 11:44:20 PM »

Quote
I'd just flip it over and graft as with a knit st--should appear like a purl on the other side.

I was flipping through "Knitting Rules!" again tonight and Stephanie Pearl-McPhee says that's the way she does it, so that's official enough for me!
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lisascenic
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2007 08:25:27 AM »

Mnemosyne_LA -- can you possibly sumaeize what Ms. Pearl-McPhee says?  I don't have that book.

My problem isn't about grafting purls, it is about getting the whole thing to line up correctly.  As it is, everything is catty-whompus.
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knittinfiasco
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« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2007 11:52:45 AM »

block the pieces then clip them together before you graft.
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lisascenic
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2007 12:10:49 PM »

Hmm...I don't think I'm explaining this correctly. 

When you graft two sets of live stitches together, the two sides get off-set by half a stitch. This is no big deal in stockinette or reverse stockinette. 

However, in this project, everything is "off" by half a stitch, so the whole pattern is jogging over in an unattractive fashion.
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knittinfiasco
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« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2007 12:16:39 PM »

That's not possible, unless you've discovered a way to knit half a stitch.  Is your count off?  Is the pattern asymmetrical?
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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2007 12:35:50 PM »

So I'm knitting this sweet scarf, and to keep it symmetrical, I'm knitting it in two pieces.

The thing is that, for some reason, my brain isn't working tonight and I'm forgetting how to deal with grafting live stitches (kitchener) when there is a mixture of knit and purl stitches.

I can't figure out how to deal with the half-stitch offset that you get when you graft.

I know there's a way.  I've grafted plenty of projects, but I can't visualize this tonight. Mary Thomas and Montse Stanley aren't helping, me.  And all the online explanations that I've looked at show plain stockinette, not a mixture.

Will someone take pity on me, and explain this to me in a way that my poor addled brain can comprehend?

Ok, if I'm understanding this right - the rows you're looking to kitchener aren't garter stitch, but a stitch pattern alternating knits & purls? (the pic looks wonderful by the way)

Don't worry about the 1/2 stitch difference. Use a fresh piece of yarn, be careful with the grafting tension, and carefully weave in the yarn tail, the 1/2 stitch won't be a problem.

When you graft, you're sewing 2 stitches together (one leg of each stitch) . The yarn can either go UNDER both or OVER both legs. (I can't follow grafting as knit/purl movements - to me it's just a running stitch, you either go under or over)

It helps to see the under/over if the knitting is flat and off the needles, (for sanity's sake, just take off a few stitches at a time, and ONLY if it's not a yarn that'll run easily)

When you graft knit to knit - the yarn goes UNDER the legs of the 2 stitches.

When you graft purl to purl  - the yarn goes OVER the legs of the 2 stitches.

When you graft knit to purl - the yarn goes UNDER the knit stitch and OVER the purl

When you graft purl to knit - the yarn goes OVER the purl and UNDER the knit

(I'm guessing you're looking at Mary Thomas' Knitting Book, p 171 for the pic on grafting ribbing? I don't have the Montse Stanley book to check)

Does that help any?

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redwitch
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2007 06:26:25 AM »

Here's a different approach:

Grafting really is creating a (new) row of duplicate stitch between the two live rows. If you are cool with duplicate stitch for mixed k and p try this way:

Put both sets of stitches onto waste wool (quite thin, maybe even sewing cotton), lay them down right-side-up and live stitches together. Try to flatten the stitches so they are flat on the floor or table, not going front-to-back like when they are on the needle.

Do a row of duplicate stitch in between them, k, p, or whatever. That's your graft! If you can do duplicate stitch in any stitch pattern, then you will be able to graft any combination without having to look things up!

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rebeccajane
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2007 05:24:50 PM »

I think by about the third time I ripped out my graft for the rogue hood cables, it clicked for me: only worry about the pattern on the side facing you. On a knit, graft as for a knit, on a purl, graft for a purl. Ignore what's happening on the other side. Although there is a slight shift, it's not too noticeable and certainly better looking than a seam. And I always keep a book with illustrations of the kichener stitch open beside me... just in case.
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