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Topic: yarn storage  (Read 6474 times)
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eulalia
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« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2006 12:37:57 PM »

  Are you planning on being a rich student?  If not, then you don't have to worry about storing the yarn.  Wink
That's true!
Thanks for all these great tips. I do know how to fill in wall holes, but I'll have to look up what the rules are for the dorm. 
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ilovemyff
« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2006 12:56:35 PM »

I'm having major flashbacks to my dormroom days from thirteen years ago! If I remember correctly, you're not going to have the time the last days of school to repair your walls properly. You're going to be so rushed with finals and papers and packing and last minute everything. My school pretty much kicked us out after the last day of exams. In my days, we just had time to fill in the holes with toothpaste before departing posthaste. Your're going to have so much fun and good luck with your storage solution!
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elijor
« Reply #42 on: February 08, 2006 01:05:01 PM »

Knowing how to fill wall holes is great but some places might not give you the option of doing it yourself. The 3-M Command Adhesive products would be the best way to go and the JUMBO hook will hold 7.5 lbs. That is quite a bit of yarn especially if you get one of those light weight net tube things from Ikea that were shown in an earlier post.

Not yarn related but you should take a set of basic tools (screwdriver - phillips & slot, hammer, pliers, asst. nails/screws, etc.) and at least one roll of ducktape. Last year about graduation time Target had bright colored tools in the dollar section - I bought enough bright pink sets for several graduation gifts. Even if you don't know how to fix something it is easier to get help if you have the tools.
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wrybrarian
« Reply #43 on: February 08, 2006 01:20:09 PM »

In my very small house with no closets (really!), I finally decided to kick my shoes out of my Ikea shoe rack and fill it with my yarn. Heh.

http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10103&storeId=12&langId=-1&productId=61027
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medea
« Reply #44 on: February 08, 2006 01:27:05 PM »

ugh. I remember a university website that had this complete section on making your dorm room look like home. Basically they gave ideas on how to put up shelves, make false walls with 2x4s and fabric and much more.


What I remember is that they recommended getting 2x4's and wedging them in the nooks and crannies by cutting them just slightly shorter than the wall and covering the ends in carpet remmnants.

Another option is getting a tension shower curtain rod or curtain rod and using it as an extra closet pole for the hanging mesh baskets.

The most extreme option was basically building a wooden frame that fits over the wall and then wedging it in with carpet covered wooden blocks to hold it in place. The carpet will keep the wood from scuffing the walls and damaging them. The idea is that you can cover this frame with fabric and then you can nail directly on the studs and columns of your fake wall.

I'd recommend becoming a pole vaulter, getting two matching chests of drawers or wardrobes with a flat top and setting the bed over them. You'll have lots of Under the bed storage, and you may even be able to fit a desk in there if you aren't that claustrophobic. Or just ditch the desk and use it for yarn.
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« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2006 01:35:20 PM »

You could use the flat kind of shoe holder and attach it to a hanger or, buy the over-the-door style. Or, buy/make a shower curtain/curtain with pockets and hang it from your curtain rod, if you have one. Or, if you have shelves, you can buy metal baskets that hook to the shelf, creating a cubby below the shelf (they just side in place). They are normally sold in either the kitchen or closet section of home stores. Also, if you have room to put furniture in your space, make EVERYTHING functional: a trunk for a coffee table, bed with underbed storage, nightstand/end tables with drawers, etc.
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« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2006 02:06:01 PM »

i live in the tiniest dorm currently (length of 2 reg. twin beds x maybe 7 feet...it's taller than it is wide) and somehow i have managed to bring all my crafts with me.  i think the packing gods shone their light on me, but anyway.  check to see if your furniture is movable.  if they don't know, make them go check.  somebody knows somewhere, and knowing ahead of time will save you lots of trouble.  if you do, buy the tallest bed risers you can find, and lots of rubbermaid tubs/bins/file cabinet things.  you may have to do a little leap onto the bed, but the amount of things you can fit under there is incredible.  if you don't, get a floorplan with measurements and buy things that will fit into the spaces.  i keep my yarn in a sweater hanger from ikea, like this, only wider: http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?topcategoryId=16198&catalogId=10103&storeId=12&productId=61021&langId=-1&parentCats=16198*16217*15961
it keeps the dust off and you can get at it easily.  and remember, yarn is squishy, so cram away.  for the stuff that doesn't fit or is in use for a project, i put it in a plastic grocery bag and hook the handles over a hanger.  not very pretty, but you can hook one hanger on the bottom of another and make a chain and store a lot it a little space.  all of the dorms here have one shelf in the closet, but the ceiling is several feet away, so you can stack them with plastic bins.  a small folding stool will come in handy for getting them down.  someone earlier mentioned a stuffed animal hammock thing, which i think is brilliant.  they're called "pet nets" 
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eulalia
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« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2006 03:11:28 PM »

I LOVE the idea of a shower rod and hanging things. No wall damage! I'm looking into those hammocks, and Behold! The crafty version comes forth! How to make your own corner hammock!
http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa020206.htm
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amey
« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2006 11:01:37 PM »

Also, repairing a hole in a wall is not rocket science, depending on the size of the hole.  It might be worth it to get a quickie lesson in that so that you could do your own repairs. 

~amey

Thats a cool Idea. Its good to know lots of little repair stuff like that especially when you are on your own
Yeah, I went to college (Russell Sage College in scenic Troy, NY) knowing how to do a couple of small home repairs (and use hand tools safely).  It came in handy one day when 2 out of the 4 toilets on our floor weren't working.  I opened the back of the tank (tells you something about the age of these buildings - the toilets had tanks in the back like a home toilet versus those tankless ones that are in most institutions).  The little chain bit had separated from the flusher handle (I know how to do the repair - but not the names of the parts).  So, I went back to my room and got my roommates needle nosed pliers and was doing the repair when she found me with her tools in the toilet tank.  She was NOT pleased.  Explaining to her that the water in the tank is clean didn't work, nor did explaining that my 5 minutes of work fixed two toilets rather than waiting 24-48 hours for maintainence to come.  I washed the pliers well with hot soapy water.  She may have bleached them.   Roll Eyes  Toilet repair was beneath her.  "That what we pay these people for." 

Princess.

~amey (whose 5 year old son is currently fascinated with how the toilet works  Grin )
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grrl82
« Reply #49 on: February 16, 2006 05:20:19 AM »

Also, repairing a hole in a wall is not rocket science, depending on the size of the hole.  It might be worth it to get a quickie lesson in that so that you could do your own repairs. 

~amey

Thats a cool Idea. Its good to know lots of little repair stuff like that especially when you are on your own
Yeah, I went to college (Russell Sage College in scenic Troy, NY) knowing how to do a couple of small home repairs (and use hand tools safely).  It came in handy one day when 2 out of the 4 toilets on our floor weren't working.  I opened the back of the tank (tells you something about the age of these buildings - the toilets had tanks in the back like a home toilet versus those tankless ones that are in most institutions).  The little chain bit had separated from the flusher handle (I know how to do the repair - but not the names of the parts).  So, I went back to my room and got my roommates needle nosed pliers and was doing the repair when she found me with her tools in the toilet tank.  She was NOT pleased.  Explaining to her that the water in the tank is clean didn't work, nor did explaining that my 5 minutes of work fixed two toilets rather than waiting 24-48 hours for maintainence to come.  I washed the pliers well with hot soapy water.  She may have bleached them.   Roll Eyes  Toilet repair was beneath her.  "That what we pay these people for." 

Princess.

~amey (whose 5 year old son is currently fascinated with how the toilet works  Grin )

lol

I know what you mean. Im in auto tech this year (not by choice, unfortunately) but it is pretty cool because at the end of this class no machanic will be able to cheat this little helpless female Grin
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