A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Do you know about all of these Craftster features?
Total Members: 296,661
Currently Running With Scissors:
474 Guests and 8 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: 1 [2]  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Shoe patterns (with brief tutorials)  (Read 12246 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
JodiJean
JOCOLE: extra-long modest shirts! personalized tyvek creations (including iPod cases) and unique compact pocket mirrors. sterling silver jewelry.
Offline Offline

Posts: 270
Joined: 11-Nov-2004

Modest clothing, tyvek wallets, recipe boxes


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2005 08:34:18 PM »

wow, thats awesome, keep it coming, would love to know how to make espadrilles.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

http://www.jocole.net
http://jocole.etsy.com

JOCOLE:  Extra-long modest shirts!
Personalized tyvek wallet and zipper pouches, custom recipe boxes.

http://jodijean.blogspot.com
http://jocole.blogspot.com
TPK
Crafty Pirate Wench
Offline Offline

Posts: 125
Joined: 19-Sep-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2005 10:29:52 PM »

Your wish is my command.



Espadrilles
Sizes 6 or 7 (note: probably wouldn't be too hard to size up or down; I'd probably just trace around my own foot to make the pattern)

Material:
Printed cotton--3/8" yd.; grosgrain ribbon--3 1/4 yds.; small pieces of felt, crinoline and toweling (scraps may be used since quantities needed are so small).

Directions for Cutting:
Add 1/2" around pattern edges for seam allowance; 4 pieces, pattern No. XIX--1 fabric, 1 toweling, 1 crinoline, 1 felt; 2 bias strips, 1" x 24" for binding; 1 1/2" x 18" for loops.

Directions for Making:
(1 espadrille) Fold 1 1/2" x 18" bias strip with right side inside and seam long edges.  Turn to right side and cut in six equal pieces.  Place three sole pieces together, fabric on top, then toweling and crinoline.  Baste loops on fabric side as shown (see marks on pattern).  Apply bias all around, catching in loops.  Sew felt sole to bottom and lace as shown.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2005 10:36:10 PM by TPK » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Geekin' out at the Cosmic Fun Palace
TPK
Crafty Pirate Wench
Offline Offline

Posts: 125
Joined: 19-Sep-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2005 09:36:50 AM »

OK, one more--this is a set of denim accessories, including shoes.



Sandals, Bag, Kerchief

Materials:
Denim--1 1/4 yds.; heavy cable cord, 2 yds.; 2 small buckles, 2 cork inner soles, 2 pieces of felt, 4" x 10".

Directions for Cutting:
Kerchief--4 pieces: pattern No. XX--2 fabric (add 1/2" around pattern edge for seam allowance); 2 crinoline (no seam allowance); 1 triangle (half of 27" square).
Bag, 2 pieces, 16 1/2" x 19 1/2" (one piece could be cut of waterproof fabric); 2 fabric circles 13" in diameter; 1 cardboard circle, 12" in diameter.
Sandals, 4 pieces, 4" x 4" (fronts); 2 bias strips, 2" x 8 1/2" (back strap); 2 straight strips, 1 1/2" x 12 1/2" (ankle straps and 3" for center tab on front piece); 2 pieces of felt cut to fit cork inner soles.

Directions for Making:
Observe the drawings closely.  There are no special problems in making this set.


Personally, I think they wimped out on the "directions for making" section of this tutorial.  The only further suggestion I would make is to try the shoes on as you make them, to be sure the front piece fits properly over the arch of your foot and that the back straps are situated so they fit smoothly around your heel.

I have a few more of these books.  It's interesting and a bit touching to realize that '40s era women didn't make these shoes because they wanted to be crafty--they did it because they had to, if they wanted to enjoy some nice things.  There were severe restrictions on purchasing new clothing and the use of fabrics during the war, and in all these books there is usually at least one chapter on how to make new, pretty items out of old clothes--cutting down a man's suit to make a woman's suit, remaking two old dresses into one new one, how to cut up Dad's old dress shirt to make play clothing for children, that sort of thing.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2008 08:21:08 AM by TPK - Reason: picture wasn't displaying properly » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Geekin' out at the Cosmic Fun Palace
artxinxlies
Offline Offline

Posts: 120
Joined: 20-Jan-2005

don't.fall.in.love.with.everyone.you.see


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2005 11:48:41 AM »

where would one find pieces of cork inner soles?
THIS ROCKS   Logged
TPK
Crafty Pirate Wench
Offline Offline

Posts: 125
Joined: 19-Sep-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2005 12:51:37 AM »

That is a very good question.  Cork inner soles were probably more common or easier to find in the '40s than they are now.  If I had to make an educated guess, I would assume a good shoe repair store would either have them or know where to get them.

I imagine these folks could also help:  http://www.corkstore.com/

Or you could forget the cork and create a soft sole using the same basic method described in the traveling slippers tutorial.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Geekin' out at the Cosmic Fun Palace
TPK
Crafty Pirate Wench
Offline Offline

Posts: 125
Joined: 19-Sep-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2005 02:28:53 PM »

Good point!  Just lay it out, trace around your own feet, et voila.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Geekin' out at the Cosmic Fun Palace
SKN725
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2005 02:58:01 PM »

These are very cool!  My neighbor who is 80 tells me that hemlines on women's dresses and skirts went up during the war because designers were encouraged to get women to save on fabric.  Then they also encouraged girls to "show a little leg" so the soldiers would see what theey were fighting for.

Nothing to do with crafting but your book called it to mind so thought I'd share!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Randommarble
Offline Offline

Posts: 648
Joined: 20-Feb-2005

My cat Marble. Make a nice fur coat?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2005 04:22:29 AM »

They are really cool. Does anyone know how durable they are?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Remember: To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world.

See my website for my products (will post to anywhere in UK at cost of postage and packaging). It is a little out of date due to a server crash. Please email me if you want a custom order
Randommarble
Offline Offline

Posts: 648
Joined: 20-Feb-2005

My cat Marble. Make a nice fur coat?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2005 03:03:31 AM »

Lostcove - thanks
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Remember: To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world.

See my website for my products (will post to anywhere in UK at cost of postage and packaging). It is a little out of date due to a server crash. Please email me if you want a custom order
tigralon
Tig Gooseberry Tartlet
Offline Offline

Posts: 248
Joined: 16-Mar-2005

~ living in a magical dollhouse ~


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2005 09:13:04 AM »

Thanks for posting these!  I love old patterns and directions from years gone by...and I love imagining the women who were just as excited as we are now, when that book was first published and they learned that they could make their own espradilles.  Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"What is a television apparatus to man, who has only to shut his eyes to see the most inaccessible regions of the seen and the never seen, who has only to imagine in order to pierce through walls and cause all the planetary Baghdads of his dreams to rise from the dust."  - Salvador Dali
Threads you might like:
Pages: 1 [2]  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
The Freedom Tower Rises: Rebuilding 1 World Trade Center
The Bay Bridge LED Project
Tapping the Crowd to Design a New Kind of Retirement Home
Dissatisfaction as a Defining Quality of Great Designers
Maya Romanoff Receives a Lifetime Achievement Award
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Teacup Bird Feeder
Winner of Craft Challenge #100-Pottermouth
July 23, 2014 Featured Projects

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.