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Topic: Drawing noob!  (Read 2644 times)
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StookeyDough
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2007 04:20:51 PM »

I think that each part individually is super good, but that there could be a little work on proportion...  One way to fix this is to 'grid' your pictures.  you divide the picture into 1/2 inch boxes and the paper into 1 inch boxes (or larger if you want to enlarge it more), match up the boxes and fill them in, and then earse the lines.  Like in puzzle books?  I also do have to agree that Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is a good book, there are a LOT of tips and stuff that me everything so much easier.   definatly keep up the good work =]
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2007 04:47:52 PM »

 had some problems with summetry when i first started drawing. Find a magazine picture you like and draw even lines acrosse it with a ruler and pencil so that you have a grin with a few squares. Do the same with a piece of paper but mark the lines lightly. Then try and replicate the magizine one square at a time.

I found it a useful method and only used it once before i learn to look at images as segmented shapes which makes it a whole heap easier to replicate. Hope it helps

You've done a good job, keep at it
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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2007 04:48:39 PM »

Haha i hadnt see this when i posted, its exactly what i said,lol
I think that each part individually is super good, but that there could be a little work on proportion...  One way to fix this is to 'grid' your pictures.  you divide the picture into 1/2 inch boxes and the paper into 1 inch boxes (or larger if you want to enlarge it more), match up the boxes and fill them in, and then earse the lines.  Like in puzzle books?  I also do have to agree that Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is a good book, there are a LOT of tips and stuff that me everything so much easier.   definatly keep up the good work =]
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river_horse
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2007 04:51:23 PM »

Great start. and i agree, the only thing that is off is proportion. What really helped me this website: http://media.academyart.edu/freeclass/index.html

it has kind of a free tutorial on how to draw a head. it focuses on proportion, and details. I found it very helpful.

good luck in your future drawings!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2007 04:53:44 PM by river_horse » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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peppersaskatoon
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2007 04:59:18 PM »

It is a great start, and I really think you're brave for asking for feedback.  I'd just like to speak up for mechanical pencils, because they're my favorite thing to draw with.  I just use a light touch and layers and patience.

Also, when I'm trying to make something realistic, I try to forget everything I think I know about eyes (like that they're shaped like almonds with circles inside) or teeth (like that they're all rounded rectangles) or whatever.  Instead, I trust the actual shapes in my reference.  It's a pretty great way to draw and to learn about the world.

Keep drawing, and have fun!
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bigyellowtaxi
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2007 05:25:00 PM »

I think you're off to a good start, too!

Not that I'm a drawing pro, but the best advice anyone ever gave me about drawing was "draw what you see."  Sounds simple enough, I know, but what it means is that you have to really look, really observe what you are look at, and draw exactly what you see.

Faces are really tough to draw.  What helped me a lot with proportions was a grid.  If you can get your hands on a transparency or other clear sheet of plastic, and draw a grid on it, then lay it over the photograph.  Then lightly draw a grid on your piece of paper.  Then when you draw you have the two grids to reference, and you can match up what you're drawing with the photograph (does that make sense?)  That really helped me to learn.

And I think the most important thing is to practice, practice, practice.

Great job, keep it up! Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2007 07:55:13 PM »

hang in there..you'll get better with time.people are very hard to draw and i have been teaching drawing classes for years,so to start out drawing them your not going to get the wonderful feedback you want,but at least you are willing to try and to get feedback from other people...strangers are even better cause they are'nt going to sugar coat it like family would and tell you it looks great when it really don't.but like i said hang in there,i don't think it looks that bad.
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« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2007 08:00:37 PM »

Sweet!! I have resources like MAD now. Thanks, guys... your honesty and suggestions help me a lot. And I know that faces are not exactly good starting material, but I just felt like going at it today and I like to start with challenges, although I don't expect them to come out perfectly, or even necessarily successfully. And I DO appreciate the honesty... I have a creative eye for other stuff, so I know enough to not expect "this rocks" or anything!

I'm definitely going to check out the Drawing book, I'd love to get my  hands on some tried-and-true info that has worked for my fellow craftsters! And proportion will definitely be my focus....gridding will help, why didn't I think of that?? haha!

I was slightly embarrassed to see my silly shark-faced art attempt on the hot topics... doh! But I really appreciate the feedback and encouragement... thanks, artsy friends.  Grin
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« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2007 08:03:24 PM »

And you know, now I think I need to go craft something tonight that I know I CAN do. *off to go find a project*
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I believe that in the passionate
There's a part that is Divine
[Waterdeep]

I'm wistin' away...
prosthetics6
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2007 08:03:35 PM »

 Cheesy
There's nothing wrong with a good ol' bic. I use one all the time to sketch out stuff. Then later if I feel like it I'll take a good pencil and finish.
This sounds stupid but to get used to proportion use grid paper, like you would in art class. It helps you get used to sizes and different shading taking is square by square. I personally think it's good to start out with a mechanical pencil but if you really wanted to get "proper stuff" derwent has a great set of shading pencils.
http://www.amazon.com/Versatile-Artists-12-Piece-Drawing-Sketching/dp/B000SSSQR8/ref=sr_1_14/103-2750923-9131066?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1188442915&sr=8-14
I find that Derwent has the best pencils for shading but when it comes to colours prismacolour has them all beat.
Cheesy
Hope something in that mess helps.
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