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Topic: Barbara G. Walker-a-long?  (Read 15922 times)
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ThreadOrYarn
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2007 09:20:49 AM »

Should I start?  I saw the Thora Sweater from the Best of Arans and Celtics book. I wanted to make the sweater but I didn't like the drop shoulder and it was longer than I wanted. The length is usually easy enough to adjust, but this has shaping that I wasn't sure I'd put in the right place if I was knitting bottom-up as the pattern was written, so I figured I'd 'just' switch the pattern around to be knit from the top down with a different armhole and I could do the shaping as I got to it.

So, I decided to make this with a peasant square sleeve (chapter 10 ) because doing a set-in sleeve with the curved underarm seemed too complicated to keep the sweater's stitch pattern (now, I'm not sure if that's the case, but whatever, I'm not ripping out what I've done to test it out!  Cheesy) And since the sleeves have one cable running doen the length, I thought it would be cool to have the cable go all the way to the neckline - so now I have a saddle shoulder (chapter 8 ).

Here's what I've done so far--



yeah, some explaination would help huh? Ok...

I knew I wanted 14" between the seams where the sleeves & sweater joined (what BW calls the back width).   I knew the neck width was about 5" (I lost my early notes, so I'm just guessing on some of these measurements, but you get the idea. Since I lost my notes, all the numbers/measurements are approximate, so if they don't add up just right, that could be why.)

The pink lines are where I cast on. (hmm, it doesn't show too well, but it's the short side of the grey rectangles that's NOT next to the bright blue rectangles. The white space between the grey rectangles is the neck)  Following the saddle shoulder chapter, I cast on the 'neck edge' of the saddles (pink) and I knit the grey rectangles (the saddles) straight.  I used a provisional cast-on so I would have live stitches to use when I finished the neck. I did both saddles at once using 2 balls of yarn so I'd be sure they matched. Each saddle is about 2" wide by 5" long. When I finished the saddles, I put the stitches on holders and cut the yarn.

Then I started the back by picking up stitches along one long edge of the saddle, casting-on enough stitches for the back of the neck, and picking up stitches on the other saddle (the dark green line is where I did the pick ups). Since I knew I wanted 14" from seam to seam, and the saddles were 5" each, that left 4" for the neck (5" left saddle + 4" neck + 5" right saddle = 14" seam to seam). And I'm sure those numbers aren't what I'm knitting since I have 14" seam to seam and the neck is a good 5" so the saddles are actually a little shorter than 5" each, but you get the idea)

 I figured at this point, I could continue with the instructions in chapter 10 since I had all othe back stitches ready to knit (p.97 middle of the 3rd paragraph, more or less).  So I knit the back which is the long purple-ish rectangle until it was about 10" long - the armhole plus a little more. I put those stitches on a holder too and cut the yarn. 

hmm, actually, the back rectangle itself isn't 10" long, the 10" includes 1/2 of the saddle strip. So it's 10" long from the center of the saddle strip which is the top of the shoulder. Half the saddle 'belongs' to the front and half to the back of the sweater.

Then I started the fronts by picking up stitches on the other long edge of the saddle (the 2 small purple-ish rectangles) I did both fronts at the same time with 2 balls of yarn. When the front was the same as the back (I did the neck shaping too, even though it doesn't look like it in the picture) I put those stitches on a holder and cut the yarn.

I probably didn't need to cut the yarn everytime I finished a section, but it was annoying having the balls of yarn attached when I didn't need them.  Plus, the yarn needed to be rolled into balls, and I didn't have that many balls made up yet  Grin

Somewhere along the way, I picked up the neck stitches and did the neck band. I'm not sure if I finished the neckband before or after I did the fronts.

Then I picked up for one sleeve (the bright blue rectangles on the side) I picked up stitches from the front, the live stitches on the saddle, and the back. I did the sleeve just like she said on p. 97-99. I left the sleeves flat, not in the round. I picked up for the other sleeve and I'm little more than 1/2 done.

When I finish both sleeves, then I need to join the body (p 99, 2nd paragraph)

So far, I've done the sweater on 14" straights or 20" jumper needles. I tried using circulars, working flat, but I really hate using circulars that way, so that didn't last long. I'm liking the 20" jumpers though.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2007 09:30:54 AM by ThreadOrYarn » THIS ROCKS   Logged

honeydew
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2007 10:42:37 AM »

The book is here, and I'm reading away. 
I like the mosaic book too -- lots of neat motifs. 
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ThreadOrYarn
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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2007 11:20:48 AM »

The book is here, and I'm reading away. 

Cool! I'm lonely in here Sad     

Cheesy Cheesy
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ScotSkipper402
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2007 02:49:59 PM »

I've started my first "Knitting from the Top down" top... and I'm temporarily stalled at the top. So this KAL is sent from the yarn goddesses Cheesy
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honeydew
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2007 05:59:15 PM »

Would you guys agree that making something for a baby is ill-advised as an introduction to her approach, since their heads are so weirdly proportioned (compared to older kids or adults)?

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ThreadOrYarn
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« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2007 07:07:17 PM »

Would you guys agree that making something for a baby is ill-advised as an introduction to her approach, since their heads are so weirdly proportioned (compared to older kids or adults)?


You could make a baby cardigan instead - the neck isn't out of proportion. Here's a great measurement chart for babies that you can use as a guideline
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ThreadOrYarn
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« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2007 07:20:21 PM »

I've started my first "Knitting from the Top down" top... and I'm temporarily stalled at the top.

Details, details!!  Cheesy  Grin  Cheesy Which style are you doing? And how far are you?
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honeydew
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2007 10:30:15 AM »

That's a good idea -- I like cardigans better anyway. My project will be a seamless-set-in sleeve baby cardigan, just basic stockinette in a variegated yarn out of my stash. I'll do a tie closure or maybe a row of eyelets just below the armhole.  My little girl likes to eat the buttons off things.
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« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2007 03:30:05 PM »

I agree that cardigans for babies are better.

You guys, I'm having severe sweater anxiety. I really want to start a sweater with all the Knit Picks yarn I have but I can't really picture what I want, besides it being a cardigan, and sort of long and cozy.
I want to do cables or lace or something to keep from dying of boredom, but can't really picture which, or where to start (after the sleeve shaping, all over, just the bottom part?).
Oh, and I also really like those ballet wrap style sweaters...
Sweater designing is hard! If I could find a pic of one I really like it would be easier, so maybe I'll start looking at pattern sites for ideas.

ThreadOrYarn, how is your sweater coming along?
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ThreadOrYarn
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« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2007 09:45:09 PM »

You guys, I'm having severe sweater anxiety. I really want to start a sweater with all the Knit Picks yarn I have but I can't really picture what I want, besides it being a cardigan, and sort of long and cozy.
I want to do cables or lace or something to keep from dying of boredom, but can't really picture which, or where to start (after the sleeve shaping, all over, just the bottom part?).
Oh, and I also really like those ballet wrap style sweaters...
Sweater designing is hard! If I could find a pic of one I really like it would be easier, so maybe I'll start looking at pattern sites for ideas.

ThreadOrYarn, how is your sweater coming along?

Well.... I finished the sleeves (except for the ribbing, but since I'm not sure if I'm doing the ribbing in the same or contrasting yarn, they're basically done for now) they seem tight, I'm not sure if it'll block out enough. I'm tired of the sleeves though so I'm going to start the rest of the body and go back to the sleeves if I have to.

For your sweater, the ballet wrap style, you can decide after the yoke is done, or nearly done. Long & cozy, definitely can be decided after the yoke. (by yoke I mean the area from the shoulder to the underarm, I'm not sure if that's the proper sewing term for the area, but it's easy to type  Cheesy )


So to start with - do you want cables or lace or something else on the yoke? Or a plain yoke? Raglan or straight-seam shoulder style? Decide and get started!

Some "pros & cons" that may or may not mean anything to you, but for the heck of it --

~~~~

Raglan (chapters 1-2) vs Straight seam (chapters 6-10)

Raglans have the diagonal line that could be a design feature - mini cables or a small lace pattern running down the diagonal seam. That might be all you need for the yoke. Then do a similar pattern on the lower body. OTOH, the diagonal line could drive you batty if you want an all-over yoke pattern and have to figure out how to get the pattern to fit in with the diagonal seam.

~~~~

Straight seam styles
No/little shaping until you get to the underarm so you can do cables and lace on the yoke without having to deal with the diagonal raglan increases. 

OTOH, you do the back & front separately for a while, so you have to keep track of how many rows you've done so they match. But if you want the yoke pattern to go all around the front & shoulders & back (like an lopi sweater style) the straight seam style interrupts that more than the raglan diagonal seam does.

FWIW, for a ballet wrap style, I think the straight shoulder line  looks nicer

~~~~

Patterned yoke vs plain yoke

Patterned yoke -
Doing the shoulder seam part is the trickiest part of a sweater, having a patterned yoke just adds to that as you work to have a nice shoulder seam line and getting the pattern to fit.

All the "hard" stuff is done once you get past the underarm and the rest is straightforward (um, for some people, that's the same as 'boring') although you don't have to do plain stockinette. I kinda like twisted stockinette for a little texture and simple knitting.

Plain Yoke -
Easier to focus on getting a good yoke fit, even if it means re-knitting without worrying about re-doing a complicated stitch  pattern.
You have time to see how the yarn looks as fabric and change your mind about the stitch pattern without 'wasting time' unknitting the stitch pattern.

Plain vs Patterned Body -
Decide when you get to the underarms, especially if you have at least one sleeve done or almost done. You'll be able to see how the sweater's shaping up and what it needs for the rest. I completely changed my mind about the body of my sweater when I tried on the yoke with just one sleeve done. The yarn & cable pattern was just 'too much' to keep going for the entire sweater. So I'm doing another inch or so of cable on the yoke and then switch to a very simple stitch for the body.
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