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Topic: vertical scarf fringe?  (Read 2570 times)
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ilovepaper
« on: December 02, 2004 03:38:08 AM »

I was  shopping yesterday and saw this cute scarf-


http://www.aeropostale.com/images/Holiday04/medium/female/accessories/w_accessories_8a930.jpg



Anyway, it looks really simple to knit except for the fringe. It isn't just just strands of yarn hanging off the ends, it looks knitted somehow. This isn't any kind of emergency, I'm just curious because I would like to make one for myself in the near future. I am really new at knitting and can handle basic stuff... do you think this is too difficult for a novice?
thanks knitters.
 Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2004 03:58:17 AM »

It looks as though the scarf may be woven.
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bfkirsch
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2004 04:04:56 AM »

twisted fringe?
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ilovepaper
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2004 04:23:04 AM »

thanks for the quick replies.

It looks as though the scarf may be woven.
I examined it pretty closely and am pretty sure they were knit stitches... but then again, I am no expert. How would I know if it were woven?
twisted fringe?
ya know... it did look almost braid-like. How would one go about that look?

I'm sorry for all these lamo questions.
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2004 04:52:30 AM »

alas, it does look woven.

if it is knitted, then they must have knit it "longways" and found a way to let the yarn dangle from the edges but neatly tied so that it won't unravel....
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Mojo
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2004 05:02:38 AM »


if it is knitted, then they must have knit it "longways" and found a way to let the yarn dangle from the edges but neatly tied so that it won't unravel....

I second this.  It might be knitted horizontally with the yarn ends left long.
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starlings
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2004 05:11:17 AM »

Yes. longways is definitely the way to go if you want to make a similar scarf. A scarf knitted this way goes really quickly, too, which is a bonus. You wouldn't believe how much of the time spent knitting a scarf in the usual way is actually spent turning the work!

You may think that all that casting on and binding off is a chore, but since it's a scarf with no real stitch pattern the number of cast-on stitches doesn't need to be precise.

This type of scarf is also a great way to use up odd yarns.

Do a garter stitch gauge swatch to calculate your gauge. If you're going to use a few different weights of yarn in your scarf, knit your swatch in the one you'll use the most or the "average" weight. Determine your stitches-per-inch and multiply this by the number of inches of desired scarf length.

Cast that number of stitches onto a long circular needle, leaving a long tail (9 inches or so) at the beginning of the work. At the end of the cast on row, cut the yarn, leaving a long tail there too.
Knit the next row in either the same yarn or another one. Leave a long tail at the beginning of your row, knit to the end and cut the yarn, leaving a long tail.  

If you want wide stripes, you still need to break the yarn at the end of every row.

Continue until the scarf is as wide as you want it and bind off loosely.
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emling
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2004 06:37:49 AM »

As for the fringes--I have seen these scarves, and they look to me like they're made of knitted strands.  One way to get a fringe that looks similar is to make a crocheted fringe--just do a long single crochet strand for each bit of fringe.  That way you won't have that raw yarn look.
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ilovepaper
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2004 06:52:21 AM »

thank you starlings, that sounds like i could do it once i get some circular needles. Please don't laugh, this is probably a reeeeeaaaalllllllll y  dumb question.... say if the scarf was 60 inches long, how on earth can all of that fit on any needle? do they make needles that long? wouldn't i poke my eye out?

As for the fringes--I have seen these scarves, and they look to me like they're made of knitted strands. One way to get a fringe that looks similar is to make a crocheted fringe--just do a long single crochet strand for each bit of fringe. That way you won't have that raw yarn look.
I think you are right emling, i could use a teeny crochet hook and it would probably look like that.

ok, i'm going to practice on this before the January portion of our craftalong un-swap calls for knitting.
thanks everyone.
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starlings
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2004 07:05:06 AM »

say if the scarf was 60 inches long, how on earth can all of that fit on any needle? do they make needles that long? wouldn't i poke my eye out?

You'd be surprised. A 40 inch needle would be a safe bet. I don't own anything longer than 32 inches, so I guess I must have used one of those (haven't made one of these scarves for a few years, and I'm SO bad at keeping project notes).

You will not poke your eye out if you're very very careful. No, just kidding.
Remember: the needles are the same length, it's the cord that's longer! The project just sits nicely in your lap.
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glccafar
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2004 05:02:50 PM »

Yes. longways is definitely the way to go if you want to make a similar scarf.

Thanks for the instructions, starlings.  I think I'm going to have to try this!
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ilovepaper
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2004 06:08:59 PM »

whew, I'm glad that I will not poke an eye out LOL Wink
2 more questions....
what size needles and what type of yarn do you think I would use, it was really light and very soft, it was almost like not touching anything and the stitches were really small and close together.
thanks again for helping me.
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« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2004 07:13:28 PM »

I can't get a great idea of the size, etc. from the pic you posted, and I don't go in the Aeropostale store if I can help it.  (Too many giggling, anorexic teenagers.  I just turned 28, and I my body's never been the same since my daughter was born, and frankly, I don't need to be reminded of it by a bunch of haughty little teenyboppers, which, I can assure you, are the majority of patrons in my local Aeropostale, and that generalization is not meant to pigeonhole any of YOU who may shop there.  [ / rant ])

Ah, but anyway, I think it'd be pretty easy to make.  It looks likely a lovely, soft merino, maybe, and if you got a baby or sport weight, and knitted it up on a size 5 or 6 needle, you'd probably get a pretty, soft, and fairly finely knit fabric.  And if you want to do a nice inexpensive version, you could always work it up in Red Heart baby yarn.  The TLC baby yarn is 100% acrylic, so VERY washable, but it is also VERY soft, with a very subtle sheen.  I personally think it is quite attractive, and for about $2 per 6oz skein, it's hard to beat the price.  AND, they've expanded the available colors to include some brighter colors, rather than the traditional pale pastels.  I think you could actually do a pretty close job of duplicating the Aeropostale color pallette with the TLC Baby.

As for the fringe:  Could it be I-cord?  Is it possible that they broke yarn for each stripe, leaving very long tails, and then knitting the tails up in I-cord and knotted them at the end?
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starlings
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2004 07:27:37 PM »

As for the fringe:  Could it be I-cord?  Is it possible that they broke yarn for each stripe, leaving very long tails, and then knitting the tails up in I-cord and knotted them at the end?

I've seen these scarves around, and it is definitely a self-fringe.  The yarn is usually lofty and cord-like. Like this, maybe:
http://www.yarnmarket.com/product.cfm?action=show_product&product_id=665
or this, but smoother:
http://www.yarnmarket.com/product.cfm?action=show_product&product_id=502
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Lothruin
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« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2004 08:15:26 PM »

*sigh*  I hate being directed to yarn stores for examples...  I'm SO BROKE!  (Although my parents gave me $150 for my birthday today, but I think they intended it to help with my bills...)

I only suggested it because she said the fringe looked knitted.  So, if it is a self-fringe, but does, in fact, look knitted, then could it be a cable-constructed yarn? 
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« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2004 11:55:22 PM »

that's what i was going to suggest-- that it is knitted lengthwise out of a tubular yarn rather than a worsted yarn. so the yarn is in effect a little tube of i-cord on its own, and the tails at the end of each row automatically look knitted.
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ilovepaper
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2004 03:19:55 AM »

starlings, it does look a lot like that second link, thanks for your help.
Lothruin- I HEAR YA SISTA. I can't shop there for myself. I gave birth to 3, plus I'm 39, so I have less business walking through thier doors than you. I'm not sure who's body I am walking around in but it ain't the one I had 12 years ago.  Cry Anyway, I did buy some really cute, soft, monkey pajamas for my neice.
Thanks for the tips, I would definitely do it with cheap yarn the first time around, these 3 daughters leave me with very little craft money.
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starlings
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2004 07:03:58 AM »

*sigh*  I hate being directed to yarn stores for examples... 

I've tried loading bits of yarn into my CD-R drive, but that never seems to work. Smiley

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« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2004 07:36:18 AM »

I know people have already answered your question of how to make the scarf without having to add the fringe after. But it was thinking, it would also be really easy to crochet longways, just leave a tail on each end........that way you wouldnt have to buy circs. Unless you don't know how to crochet, then this post is pointless Smiley
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ilovepaper
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2004 09:02:20 AM »

Good thinking littleone!
I can crochet way faster than I can knit. My mom taught me when I was around 5, so I've had a few years of practice. I can already see an increase in my knitting speed as I'm becoming more comfortable juggling 2 needles. Granted, I've only made 3 scarves and 2 were on size 17 needles with real chunky yarn but after Christmastime I will actually try a pattern of some kind.... just wait for my questions then!
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emling
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2004 10:12:24 AM »

Yet ANOTHER possibility that hasn't been suggested yet is this--it's labor-intensive, but I can imagine it might look pretty cool:

1. Crochet several long chains with a small needle using a fairly lightweight yarn--sportweight or baby weight should do the trick. All of the chains should be the same length (I'm thinking 3 yards or so--but you'd have to experiment), and in different colors
2. Cast on using a chain as your 'yarn'. I'd use the knitted cast on method, or some other method that leaves the cast on tail at the beginning of the cast on row. The cast on tail should be as long as you want your fringe to be. Stop casting on stitches when the remaining chain is fringe length.
3. Turn your work, and join a different colored chain, again leaving a fringe-lentgh tail.  Knit to the end of the row. You'll probably want to knot the fringe 'tails' together in some way so your edges are neat, and so nothing works loose.
4. Repeat with remaining chains, until the scarf is as wide as you want it to be, bind off.

Hmmm, come to think of it, maybe I should give this a try.  I always like the idea of manufacturing your own yarn, whether it's from cut up fabric, spinning your own wool, or using left-over yarn in a creative way. I made a kick-butt bathroom rug out of some of my husband's old t-shirts once, and it was gratifying to see a project from the yarn-creation stage to the end.
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« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2004 11:22:27 AM »

Ok, guys, I was lucky (?) enough to see a scarf like this in person, where I could pull at it, touch it, and examine it closely.  And now I'm fascinated/obsessed.  I'm pretty sure I've figured out the basic idea behind it, but not all the details.  and let me tell you, you'd have to be insane to copy this by hand, but I'm probably going to try it out a little to see if I can figure out the last details.

Ok, so each fringe piece is 4 stitch icord (in tiny yarn on tiny needles.)  So you need to start by making a bunch of icords as long as you want your fringe.  You need 2 icords for each solid color verticle stripe.  It looks like the scarf here has the color sequence WYBPTYPBT
(W=white, Y= yellow, B= blue, P= pink, T= turquoise)
So you'd lay out your icords like so: WWYYBBPPTTYYPPBBTT - the first letter of each pair is in set A, and the second is in set B
Then you join these icords together in some fancy way (this is where the details get fuzzy)so that on alternate rows  (or pairs of rows?) you're working alternate sets of icords.  (here the lowercase letters represent the individual stitches of one side of each icord, so ww are both part of one W)
wwyybbppttyyppbbttw w  (set A)
 wwyybbppttyyppbbttw w  (set B)

 and do something like Beppycat's double sided stockinette (but making sure that the two sides are locked together all the way across somehow) for the body of the scarf.  The key, however, is that you're kind of alternating which half of the icords you're working on.  So for the first 2 rows you work set A, the second 2 rows you work set B, you continue alternating in this manner until you get to the end of the scarf, and then you switch back to individual icords)

This will make the verticle stripes - the really interesting thing about the stripes is that they're not solid.  They go *solid, interleaved, repeat from *.  Where "interleaved" means the stitches in the column alternate colors. 

I'm going to be looking into this problem more (probably after christmas) later.  I may have to break down and buy the scarf as a reference!  I just find this so interesting in a 'theoretical knitting' kind of way.  My grip on sanity is definitely getting more tenuous Wink
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« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2004 11:30:56 AM »

I was going to say, couldn't you just knit each row as its own entity, leaving the tail on each end and the sew them together?  I know that would be a lot more work than crochet but it gives you the nice knit texture.  Just a thought  Grin
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svava
« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2004 11:47:05 AM »

I made my bf's mom a vertical stripe with knitted fringe for x-mas.  Each stripe starts as its own entity then joins for the body of the scarf (intarsia color work) and separates into separate little strips for the fringe on the opposite end.  I used a pattern from Interweave Knits (don't remember which issue).  It was rather tedious being fingering weight yarns and on #2 needles... but the finished product was well worth it.
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ilovepaper
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2004 04:34:49 AM »

and let me tell you, you'd have to be insane to copy this by hand,
'nuff said... maybe I'll just buy one. I've been questioning my sanity lately anyway.
I'd love to see how it comes out if anyone tries it.

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« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2004 07:07:30 AM »

I was going to say, couldn't you just knit each row as its own entity, leaving the tail on each end and the sew them together?  I know that would be a lot more work than crochet but it gives you the nice knit texture.  Just a thought  Grin
thus defeating the purpose of not buying circular needles.......unles s you just did it like...4 stitches across on straights, but that would take FOREVER too much turning! That's a good idea though.
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« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2004 11:57:56 AM »

i own this scarf... there's no way it's knitted. it's machine-made all the way, probably in china.

 i think it was $28 or something... you should just buy it.  and save yourself the insanity Smiley
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« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2004 09:18:12 AM »

i own this scarf... there's no way it's knitted. it's machine-made all the way, probably in china.

 i think it was $28 or something... you should just buy it. and save yourself the insanity Smiley
I think it's kind of fun trying to figure it out, you feel very proud when you finally get it done. Plus, I would personally never pay close to thirty bucks on a scarf, especially if I knew there was a way I could figure out how to make it...but, I'm cheap, soooo
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« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2004 11:47:17 AM »

The one I saw, my friend said she got for $7, so I may buy one if I can find it at that price, just so that I can have a reference when figuring it out.  I am insane enough to want to really figure it out, so stay tuned.  I may get to this sometime after christmas and post a tute!
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« Reply #29 on: December 11, 2004 12:30:18 PM »

i own this scarf... there's no way it's knitted. it's machine-made all the way, probably in china.

 i think it was $28 or something... you should just buy it. and save yourself the insanity Smiley
I think it's kind of fun trying to figure it out, you feel very proud when you finally get it done. Plus, I would personally never pay close to thirty bucks on a scarf, especially if I knew there was a way I could figure out how to make it...but, I'm cheap, soooo

my point is, it is not knitted.  it is machine woven. you can spin your wheels all you like trying to figure it out... but you can't turn an apple into an orange.   it also has 15 different colors in it... even if you buy the cheap stuff (like i do cause i have no money either) there's no way you're going to spend less than $28.   

if you want to make a vertically-striped scarf that is self fringing... that's another story.   i have made them before and they do turn out wonderfully...  my friend kyra in fact just finished a huge menswear scarf using this same method... http://kyra.typepad.com/knitmeister/2004/12/the_scarf_in_ny.html

get some really long circs (40" or so) and cast on somewhere in the neighborhood of 400-500 stitches.  when you come to the end of a row, leave a 7" tail and cut it.  begin each row with a 7" tail as well.  once the scarf is the length you want, tie every other tail together and voila-- fringe. 
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« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2004 08:40:50 PM »

One more reply here...I just saw the nearly identical scarf at Walmart with the vertical fringes for $8.88.  I don't know where you live but if you live in the US, check out Walmart.  Woohoo!
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