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Topic: Crocheter wanting to dip her toe into image reproduction  (Read 732 times)
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little.mrs.sunshine
« on: July 26, 2007 02:41:17 PM »

Hi,

I hope this hasn't been asked lots of times, I did try to search it but came up with nothing.  Anyway, I was just wondering what the pros and cons were of the different types of image reproduction, if technique and islands/bridges are the main differences between screenprinting and stenciling or whether it was something else.  Which one is better for a total novice? Just wanting to have a go sometime soon and didn't know which path to take...

Thanks in advance.
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2007 03:36:08 PM »

Well, to begin with, Stencilling requires a much smaller investment than screenprinting.  You just basically need something to make the stencil from, something to stencil on, a knife, and some paint.  To screenprint, you'd need a screen, photo emulsion fluid, emulsion remover, a screen squeegee, etc.  Additionally, you'll need a dark room of sorts, and easy clean access to light.  While screenprinting can be done at home relatively easily, it is an investment, and it's difficult to teach yourself.  It is more versatile, after you know how to do it though.  If you're interested in learning screenprinting, I would suggest taking a community college course or looking for a printmaker's collective in your area.

You can also consider linoleum block printing (which some people here call "rubber stamp carving" which is pretty inaccurate).  You can buy linoleum at art supply stores, and carving tools.  They work sort of like stamps, I guess, but the technique is a little more laborious.  Linoleum is, however, my medium of choice  Smiley
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Era Vera
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2007 01:06:50 AM »

Yeah, I'd go for stenciling first. I've done a little screenprinting in school and it is MESSY. Also requires way more time, space, and materials. Get some freezer paper (unless you don't live in the US, I here it can be hard to find in other countries), an exacto knife, some fabric paint and something to stencil on and you're all set! The whole islands and bridges thing isn't really that difficult, I usually just make them as I go along. And if I screw up, I just tape it back up and re-cut that area.
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little.mrs.sunshine
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2007 12:45:16 AM »

Thanks, I was starting to think stencilling was a good place to start and you've confirmed it.  Will just have to find some time to pick up a new craft...
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