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Topic: Knitting icord on flat needles/how to do ribbing/magic loop?  (Read 526 times)
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DeathToFuzzyYarn
« on: July 25, 2007 10:21:17 AM »

I've seen it done, and I was wondering how you can make knitting on flat needles look like icord...I think that's what it's called? Haha...it's the stitch that you get when you knit circular. Call me crazy but I like how that looks instead of how a garter stitch or stockinette stitch looks.

How do I do ribbing on DPNs? I only have size 3 DPNS and they're the first DPNS I ever worked with. I've been making wristwarmers but I want to start ribbing, which I've never done before.

What's magic loop, and can I use it to make a hat on circulars that are ginormous?

Okayokayokay, one more question...you know when do you a dropstitch scarf? Well, is the dropstitch stitch basically a purl stitch, but pulled tight? I've been knitting since January '07 and I still don't know about purling.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007 10:30:06 AM by DeathToFuzzyYarn » THIS ROCKS   Logged
crzychick
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2007 12:44:47 PM »

I can answer your first question! I think...

You can make an i-cord by knitting with 2 DPNs. You knit some stitches and slide your work that's on the needle to the other side (of the needle) and pull the yarn tightly from the back and knit another row and keep sliding your work to the other side and pulling tightly.

You're asking about how you can do it with flat needles...I think you're talking about straight one pointed needles. What you would do is slip the stitches to the other needle first before you pull the yarn across the back of the work (cast on the stitches. Then knit one row. Then slip the stitches to the other needle, so that the yarn you're working with will be on the opposite (left) side. Then pull the yarn across the back and knit one stitch and pull the yarn tightly and continue knitting the rest of that row. Then you would slip the stitches to the other needle again and continue.)

I hope that answers your question... Wink
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CraftyGal13
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2007 02:04:12 PM »

I've seen it done, and I was wondering how you can make knitting on flat needles look like icord...I think that's what it's called? Haha...it's the stitch that you get when you knit circular. Call me crazy but I like how that looks instead of how a garter stitch or stockinette stitch looks.
I'm not sure if you're talking about icord...it's not exactly a stitch.  Check www.knittinghelp.com --they have a video on icord so you can see if that is indeed what you need help with.  But basically, icord is just a long skinny tube, like a cord.  If that is what you're talking about, then crzychick's description for flat needles is exactly right.

How do I do ribbing on DPNs? I only have size 3 DPNS and they're the first DPNS I ever worked with. I've been making wristwarmers but I want to start ribbing, which I've never done before.
Ribbing on DPNs works just like ribbing on circular needles.  But to do ribbing, you'll need to learn the purl stitch, since the ribs are created by patterns like K2, P2 (the knit stitches will be raised up in contrast to the purl stitches and each "stripe" of the rib will be 2 stitches wide).  You can play with how you want the ribbing to look by changing the number of K or P stitches.

What's magic loop, and can I use it to make a hat on circulars that are ginormous?
I've never done magic loop myself, but it's an alternative to circular knitting.  Check out the video under advanced techniques at knittinghelp.com

Okayokayokay, one more question...you know when do you a dropstitch scarf? Well, is the dropstitch stitch basically a purl stitch, but pulled tight? I've been knitting since January '07 and I still don't know about purling.
"Dropstitch" is not actually a stitch, and is not purling.  Remember when you first knit, and a stitch would accidentally fall off the needle and go unknitted (most new knitters do this--I did!!)?  That's effectively a drop stitch.  For a drop stitch scarf, you add in extra yarn overs on one row, then drop those yarn overs off the needle the next row--they are never knitted nor purled into.

I hope this helps!  Good luck!
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007 02:06:40 PM by CraftyGal13 » THIS ROCKS   Logged
CraftyGal13
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2007 02:11:30 PM »

I saw a post you wrote on the finished projects board, and I think I figured out your icord question.  That scarf was done in stockinette stitch, which consists of all knit stitches when done in the round.  In order to get the same look when knitting flat, you have to knit 1 row, purl 1 row, and repeat.  Maybe that's actually what you're referring to?
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melimay
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2007 02:38:29 PM »

About the magic loop. I've never tried it but from everything I've seen it works best with small diameters.  It needs the long chord to work. If the diameter is too big then there wont be enough flex for the method to work.  Maybe if it was a super super freakishly long chord.  But I don't think the 80 inches would be enough (longest readily available). 
A regular circular + DPNs for when the diameter gets tight is a better option.  Or you could try using two circulars that are longer.
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wootwoot
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2007 07:43:55 AM »

I use magic loop when I knit hats from the top down on a 40" needle, but once it gets to where it will fit on a 16" I switch it over, as the cords start to feel a little stressed and it gets a bit awkward.  It is possible, though.   If you had a 60" or maybe an 80" or even an interchangeable system where you can customize cord length by screwing them together that would probably be a better option, and I wouldn't attempt it on anything shorter than a 40".  If you have to buy a long circ to do it you might as well just get a 16" which works great for hats. 
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