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Topic: face-up for bjd  (Read 10423 times)
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dinosaur
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« on: June 20, 2007 06:06:34 PM »

so, i have a resin ball-jointed doll and i really want to be able to do a permanent face-up on him. oh, i know it's not that expensive to get another person to do it for me, but that's not the point! i want to be able to do my OWN doll's face-up! i'm guessing acrylic paint, but is there a specific kind of sealent i should use to avoid discoloration of the doll? (i've heard that's an issue...) the other problem: i don't want to buy online; i want to find all the supplies i need in some local store! so far, hobby stores and art stores alike have had no ideas... am i just high on a pipe dream wanting to do my own face-up?
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ConcreteJungler
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2007 06:11:36 PM »

Typically one uses artist quality acrylic paint or chalk pastels, sealed with Mr. Super Clear or Testor's Dullcote.  Have you checked out the Den of Angels forum?  They have tons more advice and resources.
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dinosaur
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2007 06:31:25 PM »

Typically one uses artist quality acrylic paint or chalk pastels, sealed with Mr. Super Clear or Testor's Dullcote.  Have you checked out the Den of Angels forum?  They have tons more advice and resources.

yeah, i have checked out DoA. but i really didn't want to have to buy any supplies online. i was hoping to find an adequate sealent in a local store somewhere, but i guess i'm going to HAVE to order supplies online. thanks for your comment (-.o)b i guess i'll start getting online orders lined up... -.-
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2007 08:50:33 AM »

You can usually get Testors Dullcote at a hobby shop or at Michael's. I like to use Liquitex Acrylics thinned, Pastels, and a gloss or satin varnish for lips. You can pretty much get everything you need at Michael's or Aaron Bros.



 
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Deek
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2007 05:11:32 PM »

You can get Testor's Dullcote at most large craft stores like Michaels and Joann's as well as other stores. It's also possible that a store might order MSC (mister super clear) for you. You should ask because even though Testor's is a good stand in for MSC... MSC is much more durable.

As for other products. You should get semi-soft pastels for things like blushing and eyeshadow and eyebrows if you want a more matte eyebrow. You'll want a gloss for top coating the lips and eyes. Water color pencils are a big help and a possibility for eyebrows too. You'll want to get a white eraser and a grey kneadable eraser for precision and blotting as well as erasing mistakes. You can also get a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser to get mistakes but make sure not to scrub at it and just use it dry. You'll just take off the base coat if you rub to hard or use it wet.

Brushes: You should get a blush brush, and some thinner brushes... for things like eyebrows and eyelashes... Get the thinnest you can...
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2008 12:07:04 AM »

I know that you posted this so that you would know how to do it, but I make templates for the different face molds going around, mabey you could use one to get an idea of how you want your doll's make-up to look. If you plan it out first you'll have a better end result.
Example Templates:





Also:
Go Slooooooooow! I don't care how fast you think you can go. Do it as slow as possible, slower brush strokes are equal to smoother strokes! (I'm talking paint here, If you end up using pastels, softer faster strokes are better!!!)
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ghilie
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008 03:24:01 AM »

So you can use pastels or watercolor pencils to do an entire face up?  I tried paint and I suck so much @ss at it that I put it away.  I was trying to do the eyeliner around the eye. 
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JillBoBill
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2008 06:48:03 AM »

I can respect your wanting to shop locally, but I have NEVER seen quality (and I mean good stuff that won't fade and has quality binders) readily available and for a decent price in local stores. Keep in mind that simple series one tubes of Liquitex acrylic can cost upwards of $7-8 in a store like Michael's whereas you can get the same thing online for $3-4. Even after you pay shipping, it's still cheaper.

Golden Acrylics (which is a really good brand, by the way) makes a varnish that's actually a mineral-spirit sort of resin (as opposed to an acrylic polymer emulsion). It's called MSA varnish and it's got UVLS (ultra violet light stabilizers) in it, which means your paint won't fade just sitting on a shelf. The varnish can be removed with turps if you ever want to redo the face or you can leave it on and it's super permanent. It has a tougher, less-scratch prone surface than regular acrylic polymer emulsion based varnishes and you can get it in a matte variety.

Everyone's suggesting pastels and ... I have to kind of think this is odd. I mean, it makes sense and you can even apply pastel dust with a brush but -- You guys put a spray fix over it before varnishing, right?


</Paint Geek> It's good stuff. It's what I would use if I had a fancy-pants doll.
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« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2008 08:36:20 AM »

Just to clarify, JillBoBill, it sounds like you haven't actually worked with BJDs before, is that right?  I just ask because I do know (in spite of my utter newbieness to the hobby) that you've got to be very careful with what sorts of materials you use on a doll, because most are made of a certain type of plastic (polyurethane resin, according to Wikipedia) which can react badly with certain chemicals/compounds.  For example I've read not to use oil pastels, to be really careful with acetone/not use it at all as it can really screw up dolls from certain manufacturers, and all sorts of other things which I can't remember off the top of my head.  So before using something that would take turpentine (I'm guessing that's what you meant by "turps"?) to remove, you'd definitely want to make certain that that would be safe to use on a doll...

About the chalk pastels, that's what pretty much everything I've read about doing face-ups recommends for blushing.  Generally the same spray is used to seal the doll before painting, and to seal the face-up after it's done.  So you'd spray a few coats of Testor's Dullcote or Mr Super Clear, then do the painting and blushing (probably with another coat after each step so you wouldn't worry about having to start over from the beginning if you make a mistake with your current work), and then spray another coat or two of Testor's/MSC after you're all done.  I'm not sure what a varnish is technically, but I don't think one would varnish a doll...  You'd just seal it with the spray.  At least, this is what I've gathered from reading lots of tutorials in preparation for eventually painting my BJD.  Here's a tutorial I've seen linked to a lot; maybe that will explain the pastels a bit better?
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JillBoBill
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2008 01:33:30 PM »

No, I haven't made one of these dolls before, but I didn't say you should dunk the thing in turpentine after you've painted it.

And, for the record, the thinner designed (by Testors) to remove their Dullcoat has a main ingredient of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methyl_ethyl_ketone) which can dissolve plastics just as easily. So, just as I wouldn't put turpentine on my non-existent doll, I probably wouldn't put Testors stuff on it, either.


Not to mention I wouldn't want to spend how many hundreds of dollars on a doll just to turn around and paint it with mega-harsh chemicals that lend virtually NO protective qualities at all - other than a not-shiny clear coat. You might as well cover it in Modge Podge.
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