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Topic: How to get rid of my texturized walls  (Read 1317 times)
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abandonedcouch
« on: May 31, 2007 04:08:28 PM »

So, the old owners of my house decided to add some texture to my bedroom walls:



No, that's not the ceiling. Here's the ceiling, also texturized, in a different color than the walls. That's lovely, right?



So, I was ok with it at first. Then I noticed that it was starting to peel.



But what finally broke me was during a moment of *cough* intimacy with the bf when he decided it would be romantic to try and ravish me up against the bedroom wall a la Joy Luck Club.

OUCH.

Needless to say, I am thoroughly done with having bedroom walls that can flay the skin off my back. However, the stupid peeling ugly crap has decided, now that I want it to come off, that it would much rather stay and hang out for a while. Here is the result of ten minutes with the putty knife and the big linoleum scraper-upper I stole from my contractor buddy [who is conveniently out of town for the next two weeks]:



There HAS to be an easier way. Craftsters, have any of you had any success getting this stuff off your walls?

I'm thinking it might be time to rent a sander, but if there's an easier way, please let me know.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2007 04:13:53 PM by abandonedcouch » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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FredPie
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2007 04:46:14 PM »

Oof, a sander made my arms sore and I was just doing floors.  Your arms will be dead trying to use it on the walls!!  Of course, I don't have anything helpful to add ....
I had that texture in a CLOSET once.  Tore up my knuckles every time I reached in there.  And I learned to keep anything slick-ish in my mom's closet. Wink 
I wonder if there's a sanding tool or a metal scraper that would work better than the tool you're using, although I expect a linoleum tool is pretty strong and scrapey. 
I don't suppose you can paint over it with a heavy layer of paint and just kinda dull it up?  Grin
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FishStikks
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2007 05:25:13 PM »

The best way to handle such a miserable wall would be to float mud over the whole thing. It's not for the faint at heart but can be done. You will still be sanding but it will be much easier than what you would be sanding now.
You will need a 10 inch taping knife and a bucket of pre-mixed joint compound or topping mix. Hamilton's is a good brand that I can think of off the top of my head. Mix your mud up a bit and put lots of it on your knife and smooth at an angle across your wall. What you are wanting to do is fill all the ridges and make it smooth again. You will have some ridges left over from the edge of the knife and that's fine. That's what you will be sanding away later. You'll also want to get yourself a sanding pole for that. Don't use an electric sander on your wall after it dries, It's too easy to sand right through the mud and you are back to square one.
Any more questions, let me know.
It's a lot of work and you might want to do one wall at a time. That way you won't get so overwhelmed with it.

Good Luck and post after pics!
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abandonedcouch
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2007 05:30:03 PM »

I checked a few DIY sites, but they were no help. Basically just told me to keep doing what I was doing. Boo.

My arms are killing me, but they're going to be way toned if I ever finish.

I've found that just scraping a little of the paint off of a section with the floor scraper [apparently the technical term for the linoleum scrapie thingie] and then rubbing a warm wet towel over the section helps loosen the crap a little.

Which led me to entertain the thought of using a pressure washer, but somehow I think that would be a bad idea.

*********************

babbetto: I was afraid that might be what I'd have to do. I may just wait for Caleb [contractor and owner of floor scraper] to return and foist it all upon him, but I want this done now!

...I think he left some jc in the kitchen. Hmm...
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FishStikks
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2007 05:46:22 PM »

It's entirely possible that in their rush to texturize their wall that they did not prime it and that's why you are having, limited, success in getting it off that way. You could try taking a wallpaper scorer and/or some wallpaper stripper solution and take it off the way you would with wallpaper. It could work. You could also try hot water. kinda wash it across the wall and let sit for a bit, then try peeling it. Does the wall underneath have a sheen on it at all? That would be beneficial to you.
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My Flick'r Photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/fishstikks/
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My etsy: http://www.Fishstikks.etsy.com
My Sketchbook Project Theme: I'm a Scavenger
FredPie
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2007 07:20:54 PM »

If you want it to still be textured, just not skin-removing-textured, could you knock the points off, then at that point see if you could either repaint OR messy-mud over it?  I realize you now have parts that are completely non-textured, so it might not be an option, but I'm throwing it out there.  Smiley  I have a very heavy texture in my dining room and I LOVE it.  I think you could achieve something similar to it using the above method. 
This photo shows the texture the best, I think:

There are other sizes here...
I promise I painted the rest of the room after this!

Sorry so huge, I'll figure that out next.  Grin
« Last Edit: May 31, 2007 07:38:20 PM by FredPie - Reason: Woo-freaking-hoo. I figured out the pictures! » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2007 11:04:33 AM »

There are steamers made specifically for removing wallpaper that seem like they would be the bomb in this situation.  I believe you can rent them.  Ask at hardware store for appropriate equipment rental suggestions, if they don't rent stuff they will know who does.
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polaris
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2007 08:57:21 PM »

Ouch.  I've run (literally) into some texture like that before and it wasn't pretty.

My first thought was that you'd have to mud over it.  Lots of work and very dusty when you sand (cover furniture and wear a face mask).  It's usually very hard to get texture off once its been painted.  But. . . before you rent a steamer. . . how about heating it up a bit with a blow dryer? I'm curious if that might soften it up. But I doubt it. Good luck.
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