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Topic: Do guys crochet?  (Read 7265 times)
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jacquiw
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2007 04:37:01 PM »

Well as far as i know in the ancient days when men were usually the shepherds they spun the wool on a drop spindle and when they had sufficient spun wool because storage was a problem they had to find a way to use it. So shepherds did 'shepherds knitting 'where they pulled the notched stick from the centre of the spindle and created a form of knitting we know now as Tunisian crochet. Also if you read up about the old 'knitting guilds' in England you will find men did all sorts of crafts and had to go through an apprenticeship for many years.Knitting also includes crochet but most likely the kind of crochet was more like Tunisian than what we call crochet today.
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BoxOfRocks
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2007 05:53:13 AM »

This is fascinating. I don't have the Stoller book.  What's the link between crochet and prostitution?

In a Web search, I found some links in which male prison inmates are taught to crochet in order to reduce their isolation, reduce stress levels, and teach budgeting and planning skills.  Their work is donated to charity.  in one of the articles, one of the inmates says he was taught to crochet as a boy.

The Yarn Project/Cathlolic Charities
McClain County, OK Operation Christmas
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ax174
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2007 07:45:38 AM »

This is fascinating. I don't have the Stoller book.  What's the link between crochet and prostitution?

In Stoller's Stitch 'n'  Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker, she writes that in the 1700s, the demand for crocheted lace exploded, which resulted in sweatshops.  The women were so poorly paid that they had to turn tricks on the side, thus the association of "hookers" or crocheters with prostitutes.  It sounds far-fetched to me, because the word "hooker" has never been commonly used for crocheters.

Likely, the word came to be associated with prostitutes because of its link to theives.  The OED (Oxford English Dictionary) states that as early as 1567 to the late 1800s, a hooker was a thief.  Interestingly, in the late 1800s, the Amish were known as hookers because they used hooks on their clothing instead of buttons!
« Last Edit: June 08, 2007 07:56:50 AM by ax174 » THIS ROCKS   Logged

AmigurumiMan
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2007 07:29:28 AM »

I have another take on that:

I think crochet ranks low for one simple reason: it's new.  Men and women have been spinning and weaving for many thousands of years. Knitting also has a few thousand years of tradition behind it.  Many old woven and knit pieces can be seen in museums, as illustrations in history books.  Weaving figures in Greek mythology as a metaphor for destiny and the art closest to Athena's heart.  There are medieval paintings showing the Virgin Mary knitting, because at the time those paintings were made, it was impossible to believe that any good mother could NOT knit.  It's hard not to feel that these older crafts are part of history, and to respect them for that.  They are living traditions that predate written history -- "woven into the fabric" of humanity, if you will.

Crochet, on the other hand, didn't exist until less than 200 years ago, except perhaps as "shepherd's knitting" which was a purely local, lower-class pastime in Scotland (AFAIK) and seems to have been a recent invention as well, judging by the lack of archeological evidence showing otherwise.  There is no grand history of crochet.  There aren't any crocheted wall hangings in the great palaces of Europe.  Nobody in the Bible, or any religious literature that I know of, uses a G hook.  I believe this lack of history is the main reason crochet is sometimes seen as the red-headed stepchild of textile crafts.

I would be very, very surprised if Debbie Stoller's link between crochet and prostitution turned out to be true.  Did anybody actually call crocheters hookers before the 1990s?

On a side note, I'm a "crochet guy", and I've heard many a story from older women about men who taught them crochet, or the man who owned the only yarn store in the county, and stuff like that.  Men seem to have always been the minority of yarnies, but we're out there, and probably always have been.
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Fluxity
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2007 12:29:11 AM »

My (now ex) boyfriend taught me to crochet. I don't know how to read a pattern or make anything useful, but I can make a terribly crooked baby blanket in a 'baby-shower' emergency. Smiley Yay crafty boys, right?
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« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2007 11:33:47 AM »

My husband actually attempted to crochet a chain last weekend.  He swears that he was just bored and wanted to see how hard it was.  He got about 6 chains and gave up.  I think he secretly wants to learn but feels like it's not manly enough.   Roll Eyes
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« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2007 09:53:40 PM »

My husband actually attempted to crochet a chain last weekend.  He swears that he was just bored and wanted to see how hard it was.  He got about 6 chains and gave up.  I think he secretly wants to learn but feels like it's not manly enough.   Roll Eyes

Haha, I think he secretly wants to learn too. Cheesy
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Bond Girl
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2007 01:07:19 AM »

This is fascinating. I don't have the Stoller book.  What's the link between crochet and prostitution?

In Stoller's Stitch 'n'  Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker, she writes that in the 1700s, the demand for crocheted lace exploded, which resulted in sweatshops.  The women were so poorly paid that they had to turn tricks on the side, thus the association of "hookers" or crocheters with prostitutes.  It sounds far-fetched to me, because the word "hooker" has never been commonly used for crocheters.

Likely, the word came to be associated with prostitutes because of its link to theives.  The OED (Oxford English Dictionary) states that as early as 1567 to the late 1800s, a hooker was a thief.  Interestingly, in the late 1800s, the Amish were known as hookers because they used hooks on their clothing instead of buttons!

Thanks for explaining that because I don't have the book either (yet!).  However seeing the title of Debbie Stoller's book The Happy Hooker.  So is she saying that the crocheters were called hookers before prostitutes were called hookers?


Also, the other day I sat down on the train, and the teenage guy next to me was listening to his iPod while crocheting away intently!  It was funny cos another guy got on a few seats down, facing the crocheting guy and just kept staring at him like  Huh lol
« Last Edit: June 16, 2007 01:11:03 AM by Bond Girl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

I'm very into Britney Spears' early work, before she sold out, so mostly her, um, finger painting and macaroni art.
Fluxity
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2007 09:46:44 AM »

I was just reading a book about the History of Fabrics, and about how crochet just kinda 'pops!' on the map right after the industrial revolution, and they theorize that the reason has to do with waste. Making fabric was the single most time-consuming household chore, and crochet takes more yarn to produce a square foot of fabric than knitting does, with less uniform results. It just wouldn't have been practical to crochet at the time.
It became popular, however, right after mass factory production of fabric was made possible, and everyday households no longer needed to make their own textiles.

I read that last night and tired to remember it as best I could, so I could post it on this thread! (Couldn't afford to buy the book) So, there may be errors in my memory of the story. Smiley

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Wistful Thinking
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Procraftination  - a Blog about my Crafty Adventures!
Swap partners - No Peeking!
~-~
There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness." - Dave Barry
Wildfyre
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2007 01:26:54 PM »

My best friend who is a very macho, slightly redneck guy has tried crochet. He used to watch intently while I crocheted so one day I showed him a few stitches and handed him the hook and yarn. He actually seemed to really like it! Then he realised he was enjoying it, got flustered, and threw it all back at me with a grunt lol

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