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Topic: Norwegian Purl??  (Read 2132 times)
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emling
« on: November 13, 2004 07:21:19 PM »

Any of you Contintental knitters out there ever tried the Norwegian Purl method? It's basically a way of doing purl stitches without bringing your yarn in front of the stitches every time you purl, which is particularly useful if you're doing lots of switching between knit in purl stitches, as you do for ribbing or seed stitch. There's a PDF with instructions (and really blurry pictures) on the Interweave Knits site.  I tried it out tonight, and I like it ok, but I'm not sure it's ever going to be faster than just bringing the yarn forward to purl.  Any opinions? I'll keep practicing if there are people out there who swear by this method.

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rhythmgrl
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2004 07:49:13 PM »

Your post intrigued me, so after looking at the interweave pictures and not understanding a bit of it, I googled it and found this:  http://www.spellingtuesday.com/continentalpurl.html

It seems like an interesting method, and I'll have to practice it to get better because I'm super slow at it right now.  Plus, I'll have to wait to try on something else, but it seems to loosen my purling up, which may even out my knitting a bit... go figure!!
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cheekymamaof2
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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2004 11:47:22 PM »

thats continental purling...I think norwegian is different in that you dont bring the yarn forward between the needles...something about placing the needle as if to purl and then catching it from the top...Ill have to go read up more, but I "think" that the two are different.
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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2004 11:53:42 PM »

I found this...its different from that continental purl link.

Norwegian Purl as explained by Saille Simonetti who thanks Wendy Lashman for introducing her to the method. Note from me . . .the motion of this purl stitch reminds me of the Twisted German Cast-on - if you can do that, you can do this :-)
 
 

"Purling with yarn in the back is really one, smooth movement, so here's
my take on it:

1. Hold yarn in left hand, behind the work. Your needles will be touching most
of the time. Keep your tension quite taut for control, holding your yarn
finger quite close to the needles.

2. Put right needle behind yarn and insert into the stitch as if to purl

3. Move right needle up and to the right so it goes to the back of the left
needle (you're going to cross the needles)

4. Pick up a loop of yarn as if you were going to knit

5. Don't work the stitch, just bring the loop itself to the front of the needles

6. Go through the stitch knitwise (front to back) and slip the old stitch off. Done!

Okay. So it's one, smooth movement. Let's see if I can describe the
movement:

Yarn behind the work, sweep the right needle under the yarn and into the front
of the stitch as if to purl.

Now the tip of your right needle sweeps up, brushing the left needle and clicks
behind it, so you've crossed your needles, left needle in front. You're pulling
your left index finger with yarn towards you. This enables you to keep going
with the movement to loop the yarn around the needles as if you were going to knit.

Do NOT work the stitch yet, just pull the right needles with loop to the front
of the stitch, sweep it (holding the loop with your right index finger, if
needed) through the stitch (from front to back) to knit it, pushing the old stitch off. Tighten the stitch a little and peek--voila!"
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rhythmgrl
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2004 04:02:34 AM »

Further down on the link that I put up, it shows pictures of Norwegian purling, much clearer than interweave did. 
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emling
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2004 04:41:25 AM »

rhythmgrl--I came across that link, too. You're right--the pictures there are much nicer.  When I first started doing the Norwegian Purl (doesn't it sound like a dance step from the '50's?), I was bringing the right needle over and around the working yarn to bring it through the loop--this resulted in a row of twisted stitches. I soon figured out what was wrong, but unfortunately the muscle memory had already gelled--so now I have to constantly remind myself of the right way to do it.

I've practiced a bit more, and here's the (temporary) conclusion I've come to:

--The Norwegian Purl method is going to be really useful for ribbing and seed stich, where there are lots of knits and purls right next to one another. I _think_ (and  it's early days yet) my tension is more consistent with the Norwegian method than when the yarn is coming forward and backward all the time.

--My usual purl method with the yarn in front is going to be much faster for long rows of purl stitches--as for stockinette.
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rhythmgrl
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2004 03:04:49 PM »

emling -
i agree, it's definitely a useful trick for things like seed and ribbing.  hopefully i'll get some good practice at it when i start the knitty's kyoto.  i'm glad that you mentioned it because i get annoyed easily at having to move the yarn and front and then behind all the time (i've been making a lot of ribbed hats for people lately)!!

just for shits and giggles, though, i'll probably try it out on st stitch because i think it would help even out my tension overall.  we'll see   Roll Eyes
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subloke
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2004 05:02:46 PM »

I looked into the norwegian purl method after seeing the really fuzzy pics from Interweave.  I love it for things like ribbing and seed stitch.  I haven't tried it for long stretches yet.  I only taught myself continental a week or so ago, and now i feel wierd if i go back to throwing/english style!  The muscle memory for the norwegian purl cemented itself pretty quickly.  I think I'll have to work at it to keep my tension tighter though, I tend to get too loosey goosey on the purl side!

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« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2004 01:58:44 AM »

How funny. After going through the steps of both of these methods of purling, i discovered that I already purl norwegian style. I still see the yarn as coming to the front however...they just call it moving the needle to the back. Either way, the yarn does end up in front. It is alot faster than the continental way too though. Cheesy
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BOYCOTT SEW FAST SEW EASY!
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Trolsk
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2010 02:45:43 AM »

Crazy, but I love this method! The few videos that I saw didn't really make sense but this write up makes it so clear and easy! I picked this up almost instantly (about 24 stitches) and am surprised at how easy it was for me to change methods. I've been knitting continental for ever and always just pulled the yarn around in front. I am making a pair of legwarmers right now and I am doing a ribbed cuff, SOOOOO much easier with this method, fast fast fast.  Grin Grin
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