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Topic: Please Help! The Interfacing Disaster of 2007  (Read 1460 times)
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jesseeyore
« on: May 15, 2007 05:36:14 AM »

I'm sorry if this has already been asked and answered recently but I did a search and didn't come up with anything.

I'm making a bag and decided to use fusible interfacing to make it stiffer. I cut out my lining pieces and placed them one at a time on the shiny side of the interfacing. Here's what I think went wrong: I ironed on the right side of the fabric, with the interfacing shiny side up underneath that. I pressed straight up and down. Somehow, the iron touched some of the interfacing that stuck out from around the fabric. So I ended up with a VERY STICKY iron. I had to spend most of last night peeling it all off. I don't think my iron will ever be the same again.

So here's my question- should I have ironed on the back of the interfacing, with the fabric underneath? Should I only use the interfacing in between two fabrics, for example sandwich it in between my lining fabric and my outside fabric?

I hope this makes sense, as I have to recut the lining pieces tonight and try again. Sticky fabric makes for a terrible bag. Ugh.
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007 06:04:53 AM »

Generally you use something to protect both your iron and ironing board from the glue. People have suggested various surfaces such as applique boards, wax-proof or possibly waxed paper etc. but in a pinch, I throw ordinary paper over the board and over the interfacing so the glue sticks to that instead of the iron.

Someone else may suggest something better but I have no craft store close so that is what I use.
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psmommy
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007 06:45:24 AM »

Oh boy!  That brings back memories!  Undecided  (A good iron cleaner will help get that off, no problem.) Wink

To help avoid that in the future, I normally just cut my interfacing a little smaller than my lining pieces, and i pin the interfacing to the lining before ironing.  Remove the pins gradually as you iron.  This will keep the the interfacing from shifting under your lining and getting stuck on your iron. Just don't iron over a pin!  Shocked That might be bad.

Hope that helps. Good luck!

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JuliaAnn
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2007 08:33:47 AM »

I've done that many times myself...in fact, my iron is a mess right now.  I too try and cut my interfacing a little smaller than the piece I'm attaching it to.  I iron on the fabric, not on the interfacing.  For a quick iron clean, I found a place on the internet that said to use baking soda on a damp sponge.  That's what I've been using and it gets it super clean.
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jesseeyore
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2007 09:15:34 AM »

Awesome- thanks for the suggestions, I feel better already. I'm still annoyed that I have to recut the fabric pieces that got sticky tho, but there's nothing I can do about it until I get home from work tonight. Atleast its fixable. Smiley
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TheDishclothQueen
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2007 01:18:04 PM »

You can also dump some salt on a paper sack and iron over that.
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nataleeza
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2007 01:26:58 PM »

I've got no hints for you, only that I never could get the interface glue off my own iron, so I decided to keep it anyway and buy a new flashy one.

Now I iron clothes etc. with the new one, and anything that might cause problems with the old one (e.g. interfacing, iron on transfers...)
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Deirdre
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2007 09:45:52 AM »

Ugh.  This happens all the time with my iron, not matter how careful I am.  Thanks for the tips for getting the glue off the face plate -- I searched Craftster and the internet a couple of weeks ago for this very exact same question and couldn't find an answer!

Re:  the interfacing -- are you saying that the glue of the interfacing came up through the fabric onto your iron?  Or that you had interfacing sticking out and that's how the glue got on the iron?

I cut my interfacing to the size of my fabric, but then I use a press cloth to iron the fabric to the interfacing.  I put the interfacing down first, glue side up, then the piece of fabric, wrong side touching the glue side of the interfacing, then put a press cloth bigger than my iron over that.  So I iron the press cloth and the fabric and the interfacing underneath get hot and stick together.  Any stray glue gets on the press cloth, not on my iron (most of the time, see first paragraph).

I've ironed interfacing before but my iron doesn't glide over the interfacing, it kind of sticks to it, which makes me think the interfacing is melting to my iron.

Hope this helps.

Deirdre
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jesseeyore
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2007 01:56:15 PM »


Re:  the interfacing -- are you saying that the glue of the interfacing came up through the fabric onto your iron?  Or that you had interfacing sticking out and that's how the glue got on the iron?


I think both! I noticed that the pieces that I ironed feel a little rough now, instead of smooth. Not soft like fabric should be. Ugh.
I didn't cut the interfacing to size first though, so it's very possible thats how all of the interfacing got stuck to the iron.

I haven't attempted it again yet, but I'm planning to tonight as long as we have power (terrible thunderstorms/tornado watch here)
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Nightowl
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2007 09:20:35 PM »

I have heard that rubbing a dryer sheet over the cold iron should take interfacing glue off.  I have never tried it, but maybe it could work!  Good luck!
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