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Topic: English Quilting  (Read 1138 times)
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wherethewild
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« on: October 17, 2004 10:52:31 PM »

I was wondering if anyone knew this technique and could offer some tips. I know that its hand embroidery (I guess backstitch or running stitch by the pictures) through a heavy batting, but does anyone know what kind of batting to use etc?
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cmoore
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2004 11:22:52 PM »

I remember an old book on English quilting that I borrowed awhile back accociated it with the more famous Welsh quilting. They are usually whole cloth and use wool for the batting.
From the examples I saw (which even showed how they put the sandwich together) they were quilted the same way we would hand quilt-English quilting seems to be defined more by the pattern and the whole cloth aspect-where the quilting is the only design element-than special technique.
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wherethewild
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« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2004 04:19:31 AM »

thanks for that!
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2004 10:38:41 AM »

English quilting is typically defined as whole-cloth quilting. That is, the top is not pieced but is a single piece of fabric. The emphasis is on the quilting, not the piecing -- similar to American Amish quilts (though they are pieced with very large blocks).

It uses a standard quilting stitch -- a running stitch (not backstich). The batting varies. If you want an "antique look", typically you'll use a thin cotton batting material. Puffier versions could use polyester (though it can be difficult to hand quilt this material) or wool -- or two layers of cotton batting, but hand-quilting will be difficult. Quality wool batts can be hard to find, but are wonderfully soft if you get a good one. Silk is even more difficult to find, but is even more luxurious.

Traditional English quilts would have been hand quilted, but it's certainly possible to machine quilt one, too.

There are many books out there with traditional quilting patterns.
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