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Topic: sewing corners  (Read 664 times)
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riario
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« on: March 23, 2007 07:23:56 AM »

ok, either I'm retarded or this had to have been posted elsewhere & I just couldn't find it. How do you sew corners. I make sure the needle is in the fabric, raise the presser foot and turn the fabric but the thread pulls and my corners are always rounded. Is there some way to make a crisp 90 degree corner?
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jloveg
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« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2007 07:30:25 AM »

I  always  doa  back stitch  jsut  at the  corner a  bit... keeps the  thread  from  pulling adn  makes  it  more  secure.  try taht.
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« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2007 07:38:24 AM »

Thanks jloveg- I have tried that but didn't like the way it looked so much when the stitching is going to show.
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2007 07:55:14 AM »

mmmm.   well tehn  you  could  hold teh  corner and  they  sewn  thread  as  close to teh  turning point as  possible  so it  can't  pull.   I  don't  have  much  problem  with it  so I  really am only  throwing  suggestions.....
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2007 10:31:03 PM »

When I need to sew a corner, I stitch up to the corner minus the seam allowance, leave the needle down, then turn the fabric and continue sewing down the next side.
Leaving the needle down ensures that the thread and fabric won't  move while you reposition your fabric.

I hope that made sense!
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2007 08:59:29 AM »

 I can't remember where I read this tip, as it was years ago, but it promised this was the best way to make your corners look crisp & neat when turned right side out, and I've found it works.  With the needle down, pivot 45 degrees, then do one stitch if you're sewing a fairly lightweight fabric, two stitches for a medium weight fabric, or three for a thick/heavy fabric. Then pivot a further 45 degrees (90 degrees from your original line of stitching) and carry on. I hope this makes sense!
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2007 09:30:31 AM »

I can't remember where I read this tip, as it was years ago, but it promised this was the best way to make your corners look crisp & neat when turned right side out, and I've found it works.  With the needle down, pivot 45 degrees, then do one stitch if you're sewing a fairly lightweight fabric, two stitches for a medium weight fabric, or three for a thick/heavy fabric. Then pivot a further 45 degrees (90 degrees from your original line of stitching) and carry on. I hope this makes sense!


It sounds strange, but it is true! And really works...even though we teach our kids to do the pivot right at the corner way. And don't forget to trim your seam allowance!
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2007 09:31:33 AM »

you could try this: sew the corner how you explained you do it; thats quite right. the after that, you cut off the corner. it sounds a little weird, so here's a picture. hope you understand the picture. this way, you dont have to stuff all of the seamalowance into the (smaller) corner.
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2007 05:00:26 PM »

I always cut the corner off - but not quite to the stitching so there is still something holding it together.  I can never get them quite square by myself, so I like to use a point turner.  It really helps to stab the point out where it belongs.  I've never had any problems with breaking threads or anything, but a backstitch definitely won't hurt.
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« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2007 04:59:24 AM »

I can't remember where I read this tip, as it was years ago, but it promised this was the best way to make your corners look crisp & neat when turned right side out, and I've found it works.  With the needle down, pivot 45 degrees, then do one stitch if you're sewing a fairly lightweight fabric, two stitches for a medium weight fabric, or three for a thick/heavy fabric. Then pivot a further 45 degrees (90 degrees from your original line of stitching) and carry on. I hope this makes sense!

Now that you mention it, I recall reading this tip somewhere too! Ah well...I don't do many corners, so maybe I'll remember to try it the next time I need to do this!
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