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Topic: Best online explanation of circular knitting?  (Read 510 times)
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Mnemosyne_LA
« on: March 21, 2007 11:44:49 AM »

Okay, I have a hat that I've had to frog twice now because of various problems (including our kitten chewing through the yarn when I accidentally left my knitting bag open).  I'm having all kinds of trouble keeping my tension steady and the joining of my rounds is, frankly, butt-ugly.

Can someone recommend a really great, easy-for-newbies tutorial for circular knitting?  Worst case scenario, I can go down to my LYS and get a lesson, but I'd like to try it on my own.
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xKikaiderx
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2007 11:49:18 AM »

I used a combination of the SNB books and http://knittinghelp.com/knitting/advanced_techniques/index.php and now I can't stop knitting in the round... In fact, I knit a calorimetry and it felt weird. haha.

I hope that helps!
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www.yarnjunkie37.bl ogspot.com

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jesintexas
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2007 11:53:36 AM »

I have the best luck with the Knitting Help site, and I constantly refer to it when I'm knitting.  I also recommend the Domiknitrix book.  She had a good explanation of how to get rid of the tiny hole where the round is joined.

Good Luck!
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xKikaiderx
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2007 12:15:49 PM »

I have the best luck with the Knitting Help site, and I constantly refer to it when I'm knitting.  I also recommend the Domiknitrix book.  She had a good explanation of how to get rid of the tiny hole where the round is joined.

Good Luck!

Oooooh I didn't have that book when I started. But you are right, it's a very good explanation. I was told by my friend's mother that when you join, knit with the tail AND the yarn for about 2-3 stitches. That works for me to ensure there's no tiny hole.
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chelseachip
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2007 01:03:56 PM »

When using dpns  I cast-on one extra stitch and put it on my last needle.  I then transfer the last stitch from the last needle to the first and knit it together with the first stitch.  It seems to do the trick. the same thing should work for circulars.  On subsequent rounds I like to hold the needle I just finished knitting next to the needle I am starting on and pull the next stitch nice and tight.  I used to have problems with holes between my needles, but that seemed to get rid of them.  I don't know if my explanation makes any sense, but I hope it helps! 

I can't say enough about knittinghelp.com[url].  It's about the most useful knitting site I have found. 
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redwitch
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2007 03:36:29 PM »

Here's the trick I use to get an absolutely flawless join: I put the first stitch onto the last needle next to the last stitch. then I use a crochet hook to lift the last stitch over the first stitch and onto the other needle - so the two stitches have switched places. This is the method I have found gives the best join without adding extra bulk. Actually, I don't pay attention to which end - first or last - is going through the middle of the other, and which being lifted over.
Then pull both stitches extra tight, can knit in the tail if you like. But I prefer to use the tail later to embroider a stitch between the first and last ones that mimics the shape of the cast-on.
Also remember that when you first make your slipknot, make it so that the wool going to the ball loosens the knot, and it is the tail strand that tightens the knot, not the other way round - or your caston will get more and more sloppy.

And when casting off your first stitch in the round, don't just drop it off after you're done: put it on the needle next to the last stitch, so that it will now be the last stitch you cast off. This will give a good join, I think it's better, stronger, easier and faster than what you get from mimicking the castoff row by embroidering the tail.


Sarah
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landry
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2007 05:00:31 PM »

Besides knittinghelp.com, I found this page very helpful when I first learned too:
http://www.az.com/~andrade/knit/circular.html
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