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Topic: Know a good bookbinding glue?  (Read 6042 times)
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Spiderbite
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« on: March 20, 2007 08:39:48 PM »

I've been using Talas for all my book making needs, but it gets kind of pricey. What's everyone else using? I was wondering if there was a cheaper alternative that was comparable quality wise.
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papermuse
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2007 08:17:13 AM »

For a long time I was using PVA glue for my bookbinding, but like you, I felt it was getting quite expensive.

I recently started experimenting with Aleene's Original Tacky Glue and love the results so far. It's really thick and tacky, so a bit harder to work with, but man, it sticks! And at less than 1/4 of the price of a bottle of PVA glue, definitely worth the extra effort!

I bought my Aleene's glue at Walmart, so I assume you can find it pretty much anywhere...
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2007 08:59:03 PM »

Thanks alot! I'll look into it. Does it have a strong smell?
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papermuse
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007 06:21:00 PM »

I've never really noticed the smell, so I guess that's a good sign!  Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2007 08:09:14 PM »

Swee! nothing worse than putting tender love and care into a project just to have it end up smelling all chemically.
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Check my etsy site for GLOW-in-the-Dark Nightmare Snatcher® journals and miniature Worry-Woolie™ notebooks:
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Likewise please check Weirdling Works the Etsy shop for my collaborative work with my father, in illustration and writing:
http://weirdlingworks.etsy.com
onthinice
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2007 05:16:33 AM »

I use wheat paste to glue paper to cover boards and leather to wood covers.

Mix well with a whisk:  1 tablespoon flour with 5 tablespoons water.  Microwave for 20 seconds and whisk, microwave again for 20 seconds and whisk.  Repeat until you get the consistency that you want - it thickens quickly, so you really need to nuke it two or three times.

Purists use pastry or cake flour because it has less gluten, but plain Jane  all-purpose flour or whatever happens to be in my kitchen works fine for me.
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« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2007 10:20:12 PM »

The thing I worry about with wheat paste is insects....I've heard they like to make a meal out of your hard work.....but I've personally never had a problem. As far as glue goes....Tacky glue is great....modge podge works in a bind, rubber cement is horrid, and waterd down white glue works great for a really tight hold.
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onthinice
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2007 07:43:18 AM »

ImaginationsEnd, thanks for the discussion.  In attempting to back up my favorite paste, I found that my current method of making it does have its faults (I use wheat flour, not the recommended wheat starch).  Knowing that, I will continue using it because I am not concerned with making a book that will last through the ages; I am simply a hobbyist.  We all have our favorite tools and methods for our crafts and many times one is just as good as another.  By no means do I intend to bash PVA or any other type of adhesive because they all have their uses.

In defense of wheat paste, it has been used for hundreds of years, and some of those ancient books are actually still around.  Modern conservators also use wheat paste when repairing old and new books.  It is a strong adhesive and is acid free.

Here are some links for those who are interested:
Why flours low in gluten (cake or pastry flour) are less likely to attract insects than all purpose flour.  This information is in the second entry.  Methods for extending shelf life once mixed are also mentioned - I mix up a fresh batch every time since flour and water are cheap  Smiley

Conservation Procedures:  Repairing Paper Artifacts from the Northeast Document Conservation Center.  Among other things, it covers the conservationist's needs versus properties of several types of adhesives.  It also mentions the difference between using wheat starch and wheat flour.

Conservation Binding Guidelines for Recasing at Cornell University Department of Preservation and Collection Maintenance.  Wheat paste can be used to remove old book linings for book repair.
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GrandTheftUno
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2007 07:50:16 AM »

you could make cornstarch paste...its really good once you get the hang of making it.

You need a few cups of boiling water (like BOILING, coming right out of the kettle) pour it into a glass measuring cup and gradually add cornstarch a tablespoon at a time. Stir the cornstarch, it should look kind of like milk, add a little more water, then more cornstarch and stir. Keep stirring and all of a sudden it will thicken and take on a glue like appearance. Tranfer to a sealable container, it should keep in the fridge for a few weeks or on the counter for a couple of days.

It is a really great bonding agent, but sometimes if you need a little extra tackyness, add 1/4 glue to the final mixture. I wouldnt use the Eileens tacky, as I find it bubbles and doesnt spread well. I like WELDBOND, which is usually available at art stores or hardware supply stores.

hope this helps!
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2007 05:08:05 PM »

I'm a PVA devotee; I'm an artist as well as hobbyist, and a scrapbooker. So the whole "archival" thing has been beaten into me. Smiley I have used glue sticks to adhere stuff to the cover of my books.

BUT if you're working with straight fabric, not bookcloth, you can avoid glue: try using double-sided fusible webbing. It would probably work with heavy paper, too.
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