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Topic: ode to ribbing / reference book showdown  (Read 19752 times)
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ookpik
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« on: October 23, 2004 12:48:43 PM »

I just wanted to share this really awesome cast-on for double rib! I looked it up for a sweater I'm making that has 2x2 rib edges, and my handbook introduces it with "The perfect cast on for double rib has proved elusive." No kidding! I'm not usually much of a freak about cast on methods but I decided to expand my cast-on horizons for this sweater.

Unfortunately, I decided this at a coffee shop without any books. I ran around to 3 different bookshops, and tried to look up a technique in probably 30 books, including Vogue Knitting and various Ultimate Guides and Complete Handbooks with no luck.

Finally, when I got home, I looked up the technique in my Reader's Digest Knitter's Handbook. There are 30 pages of casting on and binding off in that thing! It is an ode to knitting, and to geeking out about craftsmanship.

So finally, check out this edge! No row of bumps, full stretch, and fully reversible! Stockinette Tubular Cast On for Double Rib!

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renrig210
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2004 02:13:53 PM »

excellent!

For things like this I find the knitters book of finishing techniques by Nancy Wiseman to be indispensable.  It has all kinds of cast ons, shaping, bind offs, and seaming techniques to make a knitter happy with their finished product.

That looks really great so I'll have to try it next time I'm ribbing something.
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starlings
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2004 02:20:02 PM »

ookpik - I love that tubular cast-on too! For me, the ribbing cast-on mind expander was Montse Stanley's article in an old issue of Threads (February 1988), called "Knitting a Perfect Rib".  Guess what? Montse Stanley edited the Reader's Digest Knitter's Handbook!  She's obviously a ribbing authority.
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subloke
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2004 05:30:20 PM »

can you share with us how to do it? 
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ookpik
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« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2004 05:46:14 PM »

Quote
can you share with us how to do it?

oh right! sorry-- i got so excited that i forgot.

This would be better with pictures, but it's an easy technique so hopefully this will be clear enough. This isn't the speediest cast on, but it is simple to do.

1. With a contrasting, slippery waste yarn, cast on half the number of stitches required using any method. Round down if necessary (e.g., half of 31 sts is 15.5, round down to 15).

2. Purl one row

3. Knit one elongated row (wrap each stitch twice instead of once, and drop the extra wraps on the next row).

4. Switch to the main yarn, and work four rows in stockinette, beginning with a purl row. If you had to round down your cast on sts, inc 1 in the first row of stockinette.

5. With a thinner needle, pick up the loops of your main yarn that show through the wrong side of the elongated contrast stitches. So, you have your regular needle loaded with stitches, and a thinner needle lying in front of it in the same direction with an equal number of stitches.

6. *P2 from the regular needle, K2 from the thinner needle* to end of row. If you end up with one st on each needle, you can P from the big needle and then P from the thin needle. Continue working your 2x2 rib as usual.

7. Snip one end of the contrast yarn and pick it out. The main yarn will not unravel.

8. Admire!
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blumunchie
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2005 11:01:40 PM »

that is so so awesome. thanks for the instructions. um, would you happen to have the perfect bind off for 2x2 ribbing as well? i've searched high and low and i can't seem to find the instructions for that. if any, it's all for 1x1 ribbing bind offs. thanks!
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justlease
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2005 08:10:41 AM »

According to Montse Stanley, the perfect bind off for double rib would be the tubular bind-off for double rib.   Her directions are in her Knitter's Handbook, and come complete with diagrams, etc.

I did find this online though, and it seems to be what Ms. Stanley is talking about:
http://www.math.unl.edu/~gmeister/papers/Knitting/techniques.html

Sadly, there are no diagrams, but perhaps you're good with working with text directions. Smiley


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starlings
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2005 02:36:33 PM »

that is so so awesome. thanks for the instructions. um, would you happen to have the perfect bind off for 2x2 ribbing as well? i've searched high and low and i can't seem to find the instructions for that. if any, it's all for 1x1 ribbing bind offs. thanks!

The tubular bind off I consists of a couple of prep rows (actually rounds, since I generally use this method for toe-up socks) and then a sewn bind off:

First I knit in patt onto needles one or two sizes larger.

Next, I do a row of double knitting, which actually consists of two rounds, first knitting the knit stitches and slipping the purl stitches with yarn in back (wyib); then I go around again, slipping the knit stitches wyib and purling the purl stitches. In flat knitting you'd slip the stitches on the wrong side wyif.

Now comes the sewn bind-off. The 2x2 rib version may seem a little crazy, but with a bit of practice it will make sense. The basic principle is the same as kitchener stitch: The yarn passes through each stitch twice - the first time in the manner opposite to the stitch itself (purlwise in a knit stitch, for example), and the second time in the manner of the stitch.  At that point the stitch is dropped off the needle.

Break yarn and thread it through a blunt needle.

1. Draw the needle through the first knit stitch as if to purl, then bring the needle around the right side of the stitch and to the back of the work. From behind, between the second and third stitches, insert the needle into the third (purl) stitch as if to knit.

2. *Insert the needle into the first stitch again, this time knitwise, and drop the stitch off the knitting needle. Insert the needle into second knit stitch as if to purl.

3. Bring the needle around the back in the same way as before, then, from behind the work, insert the needle into the first purl stitch as if to purl and into the second purl stitch as if to knit.

4. Insert the needle into the second knit stitch (now the first stitch on the needle) as if to knit and drop it. Insert the needle into the next knit stitch (now the third stitch on the needle) as if to purl and drop the first of the two purl stitches off the needle.

5. Bring the needle to the back and insert it into the next purl stitch (third stitch on the needle) as if to knit. Repeat from *
« Last Edit: June 10, 2005 05:41:15 AM by starlings » THIS ROCKS   Logged
ookpik
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2005 02:45:18 PM »

starlings, thanks for typing all that out. i find the sewn bind-off really hard to understand without pictures, so i had given in and scanned some diagrams for blumunchie. i'm sure the text version will be useful for lots of craftsters!
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blumunchie
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2005 05:07:32 PM »

thanks for the instructions!! i love how craftsters here are so helpful and take the extra time.  Smiley
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