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Topic: Worrisome Winifred  (Read 8718 times)
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lucastheboo
« on: February 26, 2007 01:11:06 PM »

Last night I was bored and needed to test how my oven did with sculpey, so I made "Worrisome Winifred" she is a crazy cat lady, who sadly lost all her cats, so she worries about the safety of her lost/misplaced cats, kinda sad really. I used colored sculpey and she turned out okay, she did have a small crack on the right side of her face, but when she was done cooling it had shrank up and is only visible if you knew where it was. I plan on making a whole neighborhood and I might even make some cats for her. Her form came from my imagination, the armlessness and all, sorry about my pics being so crappy, but a Kodak 2 megapixel camera just isn't that great Sad




http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e276/lucastheboo/WorrisomeWinifred.jpg

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e276/lucastheboo/WinifredBack.jpg
« Last Edit: October 21, 2011 09:56:34 PM by LimeRiot - Reason: converted broken images to links » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Every gay and lesbian person who has been lucky enough to survive the turmoil of growing up is a survivor. Survivors always have an obligation to those who will face the same challenges.
Diane B.
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2007 01:43:48 PM »

Nicely done!... and she does look worried and sort of forlorn  Cry

It does look like your oven isn't too hot since she didn't darken or burn, but are you using an oven thermometer to make sure it gets hot enough to cure thoroughly?

Also since you're using Sculpey, it's actually hard to bake that brand at its recommended temp wtihout getting some darkening-- esp. in the lighter colors or those colors with translucent (like flesh, etc.), so that would make me worry a bit about the temp you're getting too.
(If you're interested in finding out some ways to bake even the Sculpey brand without having it darken though, or to test your oven at least for hot spots, you might want to check out this Baking page at my site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/baking.htm )

Quote
she did have a small crack on the right side of her face

Hmmm... not sure why you should have gotten a crack if you made the clay nice and pliable in the beginning, and since it doesn't look like the head was thicker than 1 1/4" (which is the limit for solid clay without an armature underneath).  Or did you perhaps use an armature underneath that had some residual moisture (like a bare-wood ball, etc.) which could have caused the crack, or put the clay into the oven without preheating?? 
(If it happens again, you may want to check out some preventives and fixes for cracking on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/heads_masks.htm
... click on the subcategory Cracking...)

Quote
sorry about my pics being so crappy, but a Kodak 2 megapixel camera just isn't that great


Do you have access to a scanner?  If so, just laying the figure on it's bed (face down) can give a pretty darn good photo that's quite sharp. 
It also looks like your camera may not have a closeup function (often has a little-flower icon), or that you didn't activate it for this shot... most digitals nowadays should focus down to a few inches.  Otherwise, your Kodak should do a better job... my old digital is only 1.3 megapixels but it does "good enough" (and a lot better after I finish with a little photoediting) --if you want to see some examples just so you believe me <g>, look on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/imagesCANES_COV/cov-BOH/BOH.htm
--most of those photos are taken pretty close too)
(If you're interested in reading info and lessons about taking good closeups of small items, and how to deal with light, etc., to give the best results, check out this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/photography.htm
.... you'd probably want to read the categories on Natural Light, and Artificial Light... and there's a section on Scanning like I mentioned before on that page too. )

Quote
I plan on making a whole neighborhood and I might even make some cats for her.


Cool!  Why don't you post photos of them over on the Polymer Clay board here at Craftster??
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?board=238.0
(that's the Completed Projects board... there's also one for Discussions & Questions re polymer clay:
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?board=239.0 )

Oh, and p.s., if you want some lessons and inspiration on making little scenes and things to go in them from clay, check out some of these pages too:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/miniatures.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/kids_beginners.htm
(... there click on Scenes & Dioramas...and there are also lessons on making various Animals on that page)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/houses_structures_gingerbread.htm



See you there, I hope!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2007 10:43:00 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
lucastheboo
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2007 02:39:33 PM »

Yay! A comment. I haven't got anything right now except the Sculpey, I went to Michael's today and checked out their polymer clay section and saw a few things I need to get, but I'm waiting until payday to invest on it, I can't wait to get a pasta machine and a clay extruder a oven thermometer would probably be good to get too. I'll have to check out your site, thanks for the links.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2007 10:32:56 AM »

If you need to save money (or just hate to spend anything you don't need to spend!), there are definitely ways to do that with polymer clay. 

For example, you don't need to buy some of those things at Michaels, etc/
A plain old oven thermometer is cheaper at the grocery store or Target, etc., and a toaster oven will be too (or at thrift stores, etc.) if you even decide to get one... all toaster ovens can have problems with temperature regulation though, even expensive ones, so the main thing is to just get one that's reasonable... sometimes clayers take one or more back after they check them at home (without clay)... for more info on ovens, testing, etc.:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/baking.htm
(... click on Ovens...)
 
The pasta machine is a good idea though (using a bi-weekly 40% off coupon at Michaels), and that less-sturdy pasta machine will be just fine as long as you do a few things to keep from messing it up (see this page for details:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/pastamachines.htm
... look at the subcategory General Care...)

You'll probably want to get at least one long blade, and the ones you'll find at Michaels are fine, though they can be a little different according to brand. 
In the interim, most things can be done with a single-edge razor blade, and a pack of those at a hardware store or Target are cheap.
More on blades and their differences (as well as "cutters" of various types) on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/cutters-blades.htm

A clay gun is fun, and not too expensive, but it could wait if you didn't want to do the few things it's good at, right away.

```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
Re doing polymer clay as inexpensively as possible, here's some other stuff I've written before too:

For many of the clay techniques (including but not limited to "sculpting"), you can make do with inexpensive tools and materials, or things that can be found around the house and garage, pre-empted from other crafts, or used for purposes not intended.
The only things you really need are a work surface, a roller of some kind, tools like a toothpick, an oven to bake in, and usually a blade of some kind. 
Check out this page for some suggestions on basic beginner tools:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/tools_Dremels_worksurfaces.htm

Oh, I guess I'd suggest getting a bottle of liquid clay too at some point just because it can do so many things, and is a great glue (though not a tacky glue) ...the only liquid clay currently available at the retail level is Sculpey's version which is called Translucent Liquid Sculpey, "Bakable Transfer and Color Medium".  It should be hanging on a blister pack card with the clay stuff or on an end cap with more clay stuff.  FimoGel (and Kato's liquid clay) are clearer than Sculpey's, but you'd have to get those by mail order (though I saw the FimoGel at Joann's the other day).

The most expensive thing is just the clay, of course, over time anyway.
There are ways to buy clay cheaper, but the best thing for you to keep the cost down might be just to concentrate on making smaller items and "miniatures."
Most miniatures take very little clay, yet you can explore almost every technique within polymer clay for them ... and besides they're just fun, and can even be profitable. 
...You could even make little things for a diorama, etc (even for Xmas or Halloween), or you could make quite elegant things, just in a small form. 
Here's my page specifically on Miniatures:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/miniatures.htm

Another possibility might be jewelry of various kinds, for yourself or as gifts... some jewelry pieces like earrings and pendants don't usually take much clay, and there are ways to do jewelry that even appeals to most men:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/beads.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/jewelry.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/pendants_cording.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/wire.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/gifts_men_teachers.htm

Also, many things can be just "covered" with polymer clay so the actual amount of clay used is a lot less. Cheaper clay or scrap clay can also be used as a permanent base underneath a decorative clay layer, and larger beads and other items, etc. can be made over all kinds of things including tightly-scrunched aluminum foil.
Or things can be made over a form then removed, so that again there isn't as much clay used (like bowls, or hollow-backed jewelry --or there are ways of making things completely hollow too).
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm (metal/glass/plastic/wood/etc)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/vessels.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/armatures-perm.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/armatures-temp.htm (dissolvable, removable support)
....(see also Beads > Hollow)
Sculpts can also be made with "cores" of cheaper materials, especially for thicker items like heads and torsos.

As for buying clay cheap, the best thing is to catch one of the (now fairly frequent) sales at Michaels.  They've been selling all the brands of clay at 99 cents per small bar for awhile now, which is as cheap as you can buy it online (...larger bricks of clay are available online and are cheaper than buying the equivalent numbers of smaller bars at regular prices.... Kato clay is a really good deal these days, whether it's bought locally or online).   
Here's my page on clay suppliers, if you want to check out the online sources:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/supplysources.htm

It's possible also to mix the colors of clay together to get virtually any color, so you don't need to buy loads of different colors either.  For the largest possible palette, you want to buy the "clearest" colors to begin with because while you can always "tone" them down, you can't make them clearer if you start with toned down colors.
The basic idea is to have a red, a yellow, and a blue, plus black and white ... from those you should be able to mix a complete palette of hundreds of colors.
Actually it turns out that the most primary version of those colors is actually (believe it or not) magenta, turquoise, and lemon yellow, but any red, blue and yellow will work to just make "a" palette (though the colors in that palette may be toned down). 
P.S.... you'll need more white than any other color so you can lighten any mix, and not have to stick with medium to dark colors only).
If you then add the special polymer "colors" of translucent, and one or two of the mica-metallics like gold or Pearl (which is a whitish color) in some of the clay lines to those basic 5 colors, you can get loads more colors and special effects as well.
You can find much more info on mixing colors and palettes on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/color.htm
You can also color clay with other materials... for example, oil paints or oil pastel shavings (or small amounts of acrylic paint), alcohol inks, spices, etc., and also more particulate things (often called "inclusions") like play sands, metallic powders, crayon shavings, etc., etc.
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/letters_inks.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/paints.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/inclusions.htm

P.S. For saving money, the two boxed Sculpeys are a good value as long as you don't stress any thin or projecting areas of them too much after baking (and/or use armatures underneath) . SuperSculpey is great for making heads and hands, or fine for just painting over ...and the "original" white or terra cotta Sculpey is even cheaper, and can also be colored with various paints and other things, or painted over... it's weaker than SS or SIII though, but still can be fun.


HTH,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2012 09:50:43 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
poohbear92
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2007 12:10:45 PM »

very cute.. my name is winnie so i guess that kinda relates =) and i was attracted to your post.
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2007 12:51:59 PM »

looks good, I'm in the middle of making an indoor plant gnome out of fimo and he has a slightly worried expression as well!
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gamayun
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2007 09:59:17 AM »

 Cry  Hurry and make her some little clay kitties!  I feel bad for her.
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lucastheboo
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2007 01:10:41 AM »



The Calico kitty's name is Snickerdoodle. The brownish-red cat looked alot like Santa's Little Helper, the dog from the Simpson's, so his name is Santa's Little Accident. Worrisome Winifred, of course, a little relieved that a few kittys came home. The grey cat is based off of a cat I saw at the local shelter, she only had one ear and I really wanted her but we didn't have extra room, luckily it is a no-kill shelter, anyway her name is Ear-nella (which was what I wanted to name the real cat). Lastly is a Kitler, a cat which looks like Hitler, it is based upon the picture below.



More Hitlerish cat here:  http://www.catsthatlooklikehitler.com/

I'll update again when I make more cats for Winifred, thanks for the comments, and thanks Diane B. my pictures turned out better because I found the close-up thingy on my camera and I cut the flash off.
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Every gay and lesbian person who has been lucky enough to survive the turmoil of growing up is a survivor. Survivors always have an obligation to those who will face the same challenges.
Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2007 11:48:53 AM »

Perfect!  She looks so much more comfortable and at home just to be with her kitties too ( feel the same way about mine).
Love them all. . . can't even pick a favorite.


Diane B.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
otterpantz
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2007 04:10:06 PM »

Aww Winnie thank god you found a few of you kitties, lol, I love this project, i home to see a few more kitties join her ranks! *great Job*
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