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Topic: Ideas for First Sewing Projects! (and advice, too!)  (Read 34564 times)
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soorawn
« Reply #130 on: November 07, 2010 04:31:09 AM »

The important bits about a machine are:
1-it works
2-it feels right
The age of a machine doesn't matter as much as what it is made of.  What model is your mother's?  If it's a good one, even if it doesn't work repairing might be worth it.
Maybe not. In that case, look for something not tremendously sophisticated, something easy to deal with that does everything you want it to do.  Go to some shops and ask for a demonstration.  Ask questions there too.  Have a look at the threads on machines in the Sewing machines section (right below this one), there is lots of information about this.
And stay away from ultracheap machines.  With them, you usually get what you pay for.  It's better to spend a little more on a simple machine that will last you for years.

Oh, and you don't need a serger.  There are other ways to finish an edge.  An overlocking stitch will do.  That's one I always want my machine to have, together with backwards motion and neat buttonhole making.
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LordVader
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« Reply #131 on: November 07, 2010 07:10:30 AM »

Thanks! Smiley
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sally1019
« Reply #132 on: November 22, 2010 11:34:24 AM »

Thanks Orion for the link to AllCrafts.net. I wasn't familiar w/that site and found a great idea to try for our upcoming church Christmas play Smiley.
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lil_abi
« Reply #133 on: December 08, 2010 11:04:18 AM »

I haven't read through all the posts, so I apologize if I repeat...

Drawstring bags.  This is my first project when I teach sewing, as it is both easy/quick/gratifying and also lets you learn about casings, hems, seams, corners, etc.  You can make them any size, and they're dead useful, too!  If you want, you can even turn them into backpacks by threading the drawcord through 1.5 times, and tucking the ends into the bottom corners of your bag.  I have done this many times, and I find my students like it as a first project.  They often end up using it to haul their next project!
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Mama to baby twins.  Frantic crafter while they nap!

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DaisyTattoo
« Reply #134 on: December 13, 2010 07:51:30 PM »

Sock Monkeys! You don't need a sewing machine bc they are small and they are super easy! AND you feel like you accomplished something great bc by golly you made a damn monkey!!! I hate monkeys...Seriously. But I love making Sock Monkeys for other people Smiley
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cspoda
« Reply #135 on: January 03, 2011 08:22:50 PM »

My advice for one of the BEST ways to learn sewing when you're doing it on your own: find a copy of the Sew Everything Workshop (S.E.W.) book by Diana Rupp!

I learned the basics when I was a young girl (and by basics, I mean how to sew a stitch on a machine - and that's about it). About two years ago I got a sewing machine and basically taught myself how to sew using a combination of that book, trial and error, online searches, and a few curse words thrown in here and there Smiley

The book is GREAT at explaining things to a newbie. It really feels like you are talking to a girlfriend who is explaining things to you! Whereas most sewing books use 'technique words' that you of course wouldn't know since you're a newbie, this book will say things like "Grab the thingy hanging off," to which you'll say to yourself "Oh yes, I see the thingy! That's exactly what I would've called it!"

Even after two years of sewing I still keep it right by my machine. Any time I try a new pattern and I'm not familiar with a term I immediately pick up my S.E.W. book and get a clear, easy to understand definition.

And the other bonus? She has tons of projects for beginners to intermediate, and also includes patterns!

I recommend it to anyone I meet who has an interest in sewing - hope it can help you like it's helped me!
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« Reply #136 on: January 08, 2011 09:43:35 PM »

a great idea for a first sewing project, or a quick gift for an expecting parent - a baby receiving blanket!

it only takes about an hour to put together, you can make it any size, and you don't need a full studio set-up to complete the project.

in anticipation of the birth of my first nephew, i'm on a mission to make a bunch of useful stuff for my sister. it also gave me an excuse to buy a few yards of that robert kaufman dr. seuss fabric i've been eyeing for the last few months!

i thought i'd start by making a quilt, but when i began looking at all the fabrics and trying to decide my plan of attack, i knew that if i cut up the print with all the little colorful characters scattered about i'd probably end up with alot of severed arms, legs and heads. not exactly the look i'm going for.

so i decided that a great accompaniment to any quilt is a receiving blanket. and that's what i did. i kept it simple with the seuss fabric top and a soft cotton knit on the back. top it off with some bright red stitching and there you have it!

I've added a couple of photos of my most recent blanket here: , and you can get a FREE TUTORIAL on my website: http://triangleshirt.blogspot.com/2011/01/sewing-101-receiving-blanket-tutorial.html

Good luck with your sewing!
-kim
triangle shirt
« Last Edit: January 08, 2011 11:11:18 PM by Aislynn - Reason: Modified to reveal image. » THIS ROCKS   Logged
angeldawning
« Reply #137 on: January 31, 2011 07:02:18 AM »

Fleece is a great material to try sewing on if you're new to sewing.  It doesn't slip or unravel, plus if you catch it on sale you can get it for a good price. 

For a first project try a basic fleece hat here:
http://www.fleecefun.com/basic-hat-adult-child-and-baby-pattern-and-tutorial.html


Once you've mastered that you can try one of the variations:
http://www.fleecefun.com/basic-hat-with-top-knot-how-to.html

Good Luck!
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Krustal
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« Reply #138 on: February 08, 2011 06:46:30 PM »

I think my first sewing project was a throw pillow. A great simple place to start.
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My name is Krust, and I love to sew. I make bags that you can see here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/krust
wifeofbath
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« Reply #139 on: February 09, 2011 02:49:00 PM »

My advice for one of the BEST ways to learn sewing when you're doing it on your own: find a copy of the Sew Everything Workshop (S.E.W.) book by Diana Rupp!
...The book is GREAT at explaining things to a newbie. It really feels like you are talking to a girlfriend who is explaining things to you! Whereas most sewing books use 'technique words' that you of course wouldn't know since you're a newbie, this book will say things like "Grab the thingy hanging off," to which you'll say to yourself "Oh yes, I see the thingy! That's exactly what I would've called it!"...

That's a long-standing grievance of mine about "beginners" sewing books. What's so hard about defining the jargon words? Or giving a sentence or two explaining what the point of a particular technique is?

I flipped through the Diana Rupp book in a bookstore once and it did seem as if it's much better for beginning sewers than other books I've seen.
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"An old cloak makes a new jerkin..." (Wm Shakespeare, recycling and DIY enthusiast)
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