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Topic: Ideas for First Sewing Projects! (and advice, too!)  (Read 38234 times)
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iowntoomanyshoes
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« Reply #120 on: August 30, 2009 08:10:01 AM »

I remember, way back when, we made pillows in Home Economics as our first sewing project! However, that is a super super basic projects, but for a 13 year old it wasn't bad at all! It was a good start for me because I was fairly intimidated by the sewing machine. Also, we learned to applique in the class too. The front part of the pillow was appliqued and then we sewed, stuffed, and slip stitched shut.

Another thing I remember my teacher doing was taking scrap pieces of fabric on them and she drew lines, circles, boxes, triangles, and whatever. Then we had to sew over the lines. That project stuck out to me those most because it first taught us the basics of the sewing machine and really helped out before we started the pillow.

Is this the only class you will be teaching? Maybe you can teach a second sewing class that will teach them how to make a pair of PJ pants, a bag, or something else.

HTH Smiley
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Cheyenneswthrt07
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« Reply #121 on: August 31, 2009 06:36:23 AM »

You could do aprons, utiliizing basting, buttons/buttonholing, and rolled hems, this appeals to everyone, even if there are guys in the class, they can do a groovy BBQ/Grilling manly apron  Wink
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Alexus1325
« Reply #122 on: August 31, 2009 07:26:06 AM »

I vote for just a simple darted skirt with a waistband, possibly made out of a pillowcase. That way, you can teach them hemming, basting, zippers, and buttons all in one project. Personally, I would take a lot longer than an hour and a half to make one, though, because I'm a very slow sewer (I'm butt-holish about cutting, pinning, fitting, trimming, ugh, I take awhile), whereas I'm sure there are some crafters who go from cutting to completed skirt in a half hour. But if you have a nice big poster with the essential steps on it for in the class, and little flyers showing the same, your students can finish up at home or at a friend's if necessary. You could also make bristle-board patterns of each size your students will need so that it will take less time for them to cut out their patterns, maybe 2 copies of the most common sizes. I guess that part depends on the size of your class. Or, alternatively, you could have them cut rectangles that are hips/2 + 1 inch + seam allowances and show them how to fit the waist, but that would probably make the class a two-parter. Unless of course, you have more than 2 meet-ups planned for this class.
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KLKing
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« Reply #123 on: August 31, 2009 07:41:24 AM »

I really agree with Alexus on the poster idea. And the flyers. Another method is to create sample squares, of different techniques, like a pge for each zipper application, and one for each type of seam, another for variations of buttonholes. You can have the class make a sample for themselves. This may take up time, but they will enjoy making these, and will be more confident on the real project. Even if they only do this based on the needs of thier actual pattern. We did this in Design School. I am currently working on a set, since I plan to offer sewing classes soon.
  You may just wish wish to copy off any printed material with detailed info that relates to the project.
  Finally, Since you can't sew without knowing the basics, the first class should be dedicated to understanding how to read a pattern, and how to be familiar with the sewing machine. This would be a good time to have a stack of muslin squares ready. Sewing over the lines is a must. Some teachers have the students sew back and forth on lined paper, to get control of the machine. They can do this on the fabric, by just following thier foot edges, or drawing lines on , again like Alexus mentioned.
  It also seems like Aprons are the most obvious project, I have one my 30 yr. old son made in JR. High. I still use it! Even though he got one of the straps twisted, I never fixed it, or criticized it, because It would have cast a shadow on his accomplishment. However, if I had caught it as a teacher, I would have made him fix it.
   LAST Minute IDEA!  How about making closet organizer pouches, with the various treatments needed? You can put darts in the bottom of the pouches, and zippers, and buttonholes at the top. The edges of the pouches can have rolled hems. There could even be Velcro, Snaps stamped on,Buttons and buttonholes, etc. Some pouches can even have elastic on the edge.  The top could be designed for a hanger to fit thru a 2.5" hole in the top, made by creating a facing that finishes the top and side corners. This would be appealing to guys as well. Make a sample first, so the students can refer to your work!
« Last Edit: August 31, 2009 07:49:56 AM by KLKing » THIS ROCKS   Logged

toric
« Reply #124 on: March 10, 2010 09:42:46 AM »

ive just got my first very own sewing machine! i know how to use it just fine (i used to help my dressmaker but that was with little stuff like piping and such) but i dont know where to start with it as a craft. any ideas on small simple projects or patterns or any general advice would be awesome
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soorawn
« Reply #125 on: March 10, 2010 01:09:01 PM »

-cushion covers
-placemats
-napkins
-scented bags
-curtains
-hair bands and scrunchies
-simple skirts
-coverlets
-make-up bags
-shoe bags

...and that's just the beginning.  What do you really want to do first? Wink
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010 03:16:08 AM by soorawn » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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orion
« Reply #126 on: March 10, 2010 03:31:45 PM »

every project is a learning experience. theres alot of free projects you can get from the internet to start with.

http://www.allcrafts.net/sewing.htm
http://www.burdastyle.com/patterns
http://www.allfreecrafts.com/sewing/index.shtml
http://www.sewing.org/
http://www.freepatterns.com/

theres heaps on the net to check out.

have fun
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conservativchick
« Reply #127 on: September 08, 2010 01:25:20 PM »

I know the basics of sewing, I've made a few doll costumes, and for my business I make rice bags (uber easy) and then I sew Sock Monkeys also. (The sewing part is easy for those but the hand sewing is so time consuming!)

I want to start sewing things for myself though, such as skirts, dresses, costumes, pj's things like that. Do you have any advice on what would be a simple thing for me to start with? Thanks!

Conservativchick
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Aislynn
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« Reply #128 on: September 08, 2010 01:38:28 PM »

Typically, A-line skirts with drawstring or elastic waists, pj pants, or aprons are good starter projects because they're easy and involve a lot of straight lines.  Since you already know the basics of sewing, though, why not go through the pattern books, find one marked Easy, and go for it!  Or check out the huge list of tutorials here on Craftster (http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=356365.0), or some of the free patterns on Burdastyle.  http://www.burdastyle.com/

The hardest part of sewing clothes, after the sewing part, is getting the sizing right.  Make sure you cut the size for your measurements per the sizing chart on the pattern, and do a test fit, if you're not sure!
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« Reply #129 on: November 06, 2010 09:57:50 PM »

I'm not sure if this is the right thread for this or not.  If it's not mods, feel free to move it.

I'm still kinda new to sewing.  I took Home Ec back in 8th grade...all of 10 years ago or so, and then a few years ago, I took a more or less sewing class for my theatre major curriculum.  But, my teachers weren't patient enough with me.  I want to start sewing again.  I know a few seams, I think I remember the feldspar (Is that right, the one that you find on a pair of jeans?) seam, but I don't remember very many others, but I don't sew in a straight line very well.  But, my mom has this 30 year old machine.  I don't know if it works or not.  If it doesn't, I'm considering asking for a machine for Christmas.  So what would be a good one to ask for for a beginner like me?  I think, by browsing this thread, and the fact that I work at JoAnn's, I could find some good beginner projects to do.  We made shirts in my Stage Costuming class (But I didn't finish it) and I don't have a Serger, so I don't know if I can finish it.  And a pair of boxer shorts for the final, but I didn't get a chance to finish it, and I don't remember what pattern we used.  Of if I still have it.  Any ideas for a sewing machine though?  The ones we had in my class were probably a good 20 years old.  I know how to basically use one.  But I'd really love to have one of my own. Any suggestions?
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