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Topic: making outfits by draping...  (Read 1611 times)
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seamshistoric
« on: January 26, 2007 09:28:13 PM »

Does anyone else create their own clothing/patterns using the draping method? If you don't know what I mean, here's a cool guide

I'm trying to teach myself this technique so I can go from the cookie-cutter civil war patterns that are published by Simplicity/equivalents to creating gowns straight out of a fashion plate.

My problem is creating the armsceyes on the dressform -- since I'm making this clothing for myself, and no one else I know (in a 2 hour radius) has this kind of obsession knowledge, it's difficult to work out the fit around the armpit. But the dressform's shoulders don't extend wide enough for the time-period's fashionable low shoulderline, nor have a definitive underarm/armpit shape for me to know where to end the pattern at the top.

I guess what I'm really asking is for ideas on modifying my dressform to have an upper arm/armpit. So far I've only been able to to take cookiecutter patterns and tailor them. I want to be able to make a dress, especially the sleeves, without a holding hand.

Any help, suggestions, links, ideas (no matter how crazy) or experienced solutions are welcome!

« Last Edit: January 26, 2007 10:37:15 PM by seamshistoric » THIS ROCKS   Logged
Sewlittletime
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« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2007 06:26:16 AM »

That article had some really good advice! I haven't yet tried draping...but I don't have a dressform either, so that would obviously make it pretty impossible.
The problem you're having w/ making the armscye is a very compelling reason to extend the shoulder to upper arm area on a home-made dressform, though. That's something I would never have thought of, so I'll definitely keep that in mind when i finally get around to getting my mom to help me "mummify" my torso!
I want to make mine with partial legs too. I was glad to see a site selling dressform, which showed how the forms w/ legs are hung from a stand via a chain hooked into the neck, or via a regualr stand pinned thru the bottom of one leg instead of through the crotch.  I always wondered how in the heck you would get pants on a form otherwise!!

Anyway...I'm rambling! Perhaps you could have someone help you wrap just your shoulder/upper arm area a la the home made dress form instructions, then fit it to your existing form??
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seamshistoric
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2007 11:09:57 AM »

Anyway...I'm rambling! Perhaps you could have someone help you wrap just your shoulder/upper arm area a la the home made dress form instructions, then fit it to your existing form??


not a bad idea. I'll give that a go when I con someone into wrapping me up! ^^
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bluwave06
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2007 05:54:54 AM »

I am learning draping from a course I took. I do agree that the best way to do the armhole, is by making a replica of Your arm and attaching it to the dressform. 
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Quincy134
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2007 07:06:00 AM »

That's what I've seen people do, attach arms to their dress-forms.  My experience with draping is nil.  I've been working on modifying a Period Impressions pattern recently, but I haven't gotten that far yet.  Kendra of Demode recommends The Costume Technician's Handbook for pattern drafting.  I'm going to hunt down a copy at the library.  Jean Hunnisett's books have some info on draping, but it's not very specific to your situation. 

It's cool to find another historic costumer on Craftster, though!  I'm into regency era stuff, instead of CW. 
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2007 03:14:42 PM »

Here is a link for Padding and Making the Arms for the Dress Form: http://www.vintagesewing.info/1920s/22-tlb/tlb-01.html#remarks. You will have to scroll down to find it. I use this site to help me make patterns.
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seamshistoric
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2007 07:32:59 PM »

It's cool to find another historic costumer on Craftster, though!  I'm into regency era stuff, instead of CW. 

I like the regency also, but I've yet to make anything. I've got so many things on my CW to do list it'll be a sewing-spree that gets me into an empire waist ^^;

bluewave06 - that's a very helpful link! thanks
« Last Edit: February 11, 2007 07:34:56 PM by seamshistoric » THIS ROCKS   Logged
seamshistoric
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2008 06:43:39 AM »

I know this is an old thread I'm dragging up, but at least it's mine and I have something related to contribute, rather than asking more questions  Grin

Although this thread was basically on draping, there are awesome drafting instructions at Your Wardrobe Unlock'd. It's an online magazine, but there are instructions (free!) for drafting your own bodice pattern. There's corset drafting instructions and drawn thread-work instructions as well if you subscribe. It's only been around for a few months, so I can't imagine how much more neat things are going to be available soon!
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« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2008 06:10:40 PM »

Oooh nice thanks. Love the link in the original post too.. Another to add to my collection of fashion plate links.. /drools

I am obsessed with historical clothing myself particularly Victorian era (1860s - 1870s my fave).
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bluwave06
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« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2008 07:07:13 PM »

I too love the link. I love victorian dresses!
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