A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Please remember to SEARCH before asking a question that may have already been answered. Thanks!
Total Members: 302,795
Currently Running With Scissors:
726 Guests and 35 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: flared skirt question.  (Read 1112 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
lamamarco
Lauren :)
Offline Offline

Posts: 1210
Joined: 17-Jun-2004

sewing IS love.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« on: January 20, 2007 09:25:30 AM »


Hey guys!

I am ready to get into the wide wide world of sewing clothes! Smiley I am pretty proficient with a sewing machine... I sew bags and the like. Anyway, I want to start making skirts in an attempt to dress more like a girl. But I don't really like Aline skirts... or I should say they look funky on me so I want to know how to make a skirt like this... or the skirt part of the dress.

http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=146875.msg1448358;topicseen#msg1448358

I guess it's like a circle skirt, yes? But isn't there another way as well... like an A-line skirt.. ya know how there a inverted V shaped panels... could you just add more width at the bottom to make it flare out more...  Was that confusing? because all I basically want to know is can you make a skirt like this without using the circle skirt instructions...
THIS ROCKS   Logged

littlevas
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007 02:37:43 PM »

a circle skirt would definitely be the easy way to go about making this skirt. Is there any reason you dont want to use a circle skirt pattern?

Im guessing you could make this skirt pleated. It would turn out a lil bit differently. But i guess it could work?

I would stick to the circle skirt though.

happy sewing!  Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged
lamamarco
Lauren :)
Offline Offline

Posts: 1210
Joined: 17-Jun-2004

sewing IS love.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007 02:40:39 PM »


Because I can never get the math to work out... and I hate hemming them. Seriously, I would rather stick my hand in fire than hem a circle skirt... it will never get done.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

stacysews
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2007 02:45:47 PM »

There are several ways of going around hemming a circle skirt.  You can always use bias binding on the edges, add a trim or ribbon to the bottom or add a strip of fabric to the bottom (this strip would be a long, long rectangle) that is folded with wrong sides together (to make a finished edge) then sewn to the bottom of the skirt (right sides together) and ironed down.  It would also give you that contrasting edge to your skirt like your inspiration photo.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

lamamarco
Lauren :)
Offline Offline

Posts: 1210
Joined: 17-Jun-2004

sewing IS love.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2007 02:53:10 PM »


Hmmm... thanks! That would only work if I wanted a contrast at the bottom. Although I could make some with the fabric from the skirt.

Any suggestions on how to get the math part down.... specifically the waist part. I mean measuring and cutting the fabric..
THIS ROCKS   Logged

stacysews
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2007 03:13:25 PM »

You can do the cutting and measuring two ways.  You can create your own pattern and cut from there.  Or you can use a yardstick and a washable fabric pen.  If you have a rotary cutter and mat that would be even better!  Don't forget to add seam allowances to your measurements - if your skirt is going to have more than one seam, add it to both sides of your fabric (e.g. if you're using panels of fabric and 1/2" seams, add 1" to each panel). 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

lamamarco
Lauren :)
Offline Offline

Posts: 1210
Joined: 17-Jun-2004

sewing IS love.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007 07:13:33 PM »

You can do the cutting and measuring two ways.  You can create your own pattern and cut from there.  Or you can use a yardstick and a washable fabric pen.  If you have a rotary cutter and mat that would be even better!  Don't forget to add seam allowances to your measurements - if your skirt is going to have more than one seam, add it to both sides of your fabric (e.g. if you're using panels of fabric and 1/2" seams, add 1" to each panel). 

Thank you yet again! I probably would have forgot to add seam allowances to both sides! Doh!

Do you have any tips for circle skirts.. what I really want to know! I am going to try to be brave and make one!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

stacysews
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2007 08:23:40 PM »

Press, press, press.  The difference between a professional garment and a 'homemade' looking one is pressing your seams.  As much as I hate doing it, it really makes a difference!

If you do plan on hemming your skirt, let it hang a day before you do so (especially if you're using panels and even more so if your cutting on the bias) - the weight of the material will pull down and your hem will come out more evenly. 

I'm sure that there's lots more, but those are the only ones that come to mind right now!  Have fun, good luck and post pictures when you're finished!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

i.am.flowerchild
Offline Offline

Posts: 265
Joined: 23-Aug-2006

Hello from Australia!


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2007 11:07:20 PM »

That's not a full circle skirt as there's not enough fabric in it, I'd say it's more like 3/4 or 1/2. A full-circle skirt has masses of fabric!

The more curve you have in a skirt, the smaller you need to make the hem otherwise it is very difficult to hem it without the fabric having that awful lumpy look to it, but yes as Stacysews suggests you really need to iron it before sewing.

The waistband size comes down to working out the radius of the waist (radius of a circle is the distance from the centre to any point on the boundary).

Measure your waist first so that you know the measurement.

Your waist measurement is then divided by 6.28 and that is the radius.

So then draw a straight line across a piece of paper. Pick a point in the middle of the line and measure out from that point and mark the radius measurement on - then draw a semi-circle from one edge of the line to the other side - this is then the 'waist' of your skirt. You may need to make the measurement slightly larger to give you a bit of room to breathe.  From there you measure out from the waist to the length of the skirt.

Geez, dunno if this is making sense or not, I'll try and get a diagram.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2007 11:16:47 PM by i.am.flowerchild » THIS ROCKS   Logged
i.am.flowerchild
Offline Offline

Posts: 265
Joined: 23-Aug-2006

Hello from Australia!


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2007 11:16:04 PM »

Here, this has instructions and pictures.

http://www.madamexcostumes.com/newpages/ttcostumes.html
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Andy Warhol: The Last Decade Exhibit Tour
Paints On Ceiling
Chains
An Olympic Athlete Who Is Also an Artist
How to Draw The Powerpuff Girls
Latest Blog Articles
Tute Tuesday: Fabric and Felt Bird Ornament
Cardboard Tube? Craft Supply!
Spotlight on: Art Dolls

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.