A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: You can now organize your bookmarks into folders!  Read more here.
Total Members: 297,046
Currently Running With Scissors:
515 Guests and 20 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: blocking lace made with washable wool?  (Read 760 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
aurelia615
Rrriot Librrrarian
Offline Offline

Posts: 142
Joined: 28-Jul-2004

View Profile WWW
« on: January 19, 2007 07:31:07 AM »

Hi all,
So I knit the Shetland Triangle from Wrap Style awhile ago.  I made it out of Rowan's Cashsoft 4ply, which is not called "superwash," but is supposed to be machine washable. 
When I tried to block this shawl, It still had a lot of the rippling that is common in lace before it is blocked.  I tried it twice, and I always leave my blocked items out to dry for at least a day or two AFTER it seems to be dry, just to make sure.  Has anyone else encountered this problem?
Thanks!
-Jennifer
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Listen to me.  These people walk imaginary pets.  On a f***ing leash. And they're all heavily armed and drunk.  New York is boring.  I'll call you later."  -John Cusack in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
My blog: http://cabbageeatsyarn.blogspot.com
djinnj
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2007 11:12:33 AM »

I would guess that the 33% microfiber content is messing with the blocking.  How aggressively did you block it?  It may help to put it (carefully) under a lot more tension with blocking wires or using string.  At the same time, I don't think you're going to get the perfect, flat "set" of 100% animal fiber.  Microfiber is often an acrylic fiber and just won't behave the same way.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
aurelia615
Rrriot Librrrarian
Offline Offline

Posts: 142
Joined: 28-Jul-2004

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2007 11:22:28 AM »

Dude, I blocked the hell out of that thing.  Well, good to know, I will remember that next time I knit lace!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Listen to me.  These people walk imaginary pets.  On a f***ing leash. And they're all heavily armed and drunk.  New York is boring.  I'll call you later."  -John Cusack in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
My blog: http://cabbageeatsyarn.blogspot.com
djinnj
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2007 11:48:06 AM »

This might be a good time to test steam blocking.  It's harsh on acrylic fibers, but you've got enough natural fiber in the yarn to keep it from going completely lifeless.  If you've got a bit of yarn left over, I'd suggest swatching in pattern and steam blocking it to see how it responds before trying it out on the FO.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
fyberduck
the quacking fiber addict
Offline Offline

Posts: 1233
Joined: 21-Oct-2005

I reject your reality and substitute my own


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2007 11:54:26 AM »

Steam blocking is the only way I've had success with difficult pieces.  Just use a presscloth and watch it like a hawk Wink
THIS ROCKS   Logged

the qfa:
unequivocally proving that knitting is not an intelligence test

Got a tape measurer?
aurelia615
Rrriot Librrrarian
Offline Offline

Posts: 142
Joined: 28-Jul-2004

View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2007 12:04:47 PM »

How does one steam block?  I've done the thing where you wet the towel and put it on the garment before you've applied the hot iron to it, and the towel sort of steams the garment.  Is that what you mean by steam blocking?  Also, how much natural fiber would you say you need to have in order to not ruin something that has acrylic in it?
Thanks!
-Jennifer
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"Listen to me.  These people walk imaginary pets.  On a f***ing leash. And they're all heavily armed and drunk.  New York is boring.  I'll call you later."  -John Cusack in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
My blog: http://cabbageeatsyarn.blogspot.com
djinnj
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2007 12:13:18 PM »

I would pin the item out on a heat/moisture safe surface so it's the dimensions you want, and fill the iron so it's at it's hottest steam setting, and then hold it about an inch over the surface applying the steam without applying pressure.  Give it a good thorough once over.  It should dry quickly, and you should be able to see very soon if you need to do it again.

It's really hard to give a blanket figure because how a yarn is spun matters, as does the type of man made fiber.  I would avoid anything with 10% or more acrylic or polyester content.  Nylon isn't a problem, however.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
fyberduck
the quacking fiber addict
Offline Offline

Posts: 1233
Joined: 21-Oct-2005

I reject your reality and substitute my own


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2007 03:18:36 PM »

I'm lucky in that my iron has a steam setting for nearly every fiber type.  I set it to the correct heat, put the steam on and usually press the piece through a press-cloth.  Or I use the aluminum plate attachment instead of the press-cloth.  If the piece involved is a blend, I usually put the heat setting to the mean of the fibers involved - cotton/ poly usually presses well at rayon, etc Wink

Hope that helps!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

the qfa:
unequivocally proving that knitting is not an intelligence test

Got a tape measurer?
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Easy Custom Christmas Tree Skirt
Sewing Basics with Pins and Needles
Customized Bulletin Board How-To
How to Make a Paper Carnation Flower
DIY Craft Trays for Cars
Latest Blog Articles
August 20, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Faux Cross Stitch Sweatshirt
More Great Crafts Using Cardboard Tubes

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.