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Topic: How to make the fold-in hem of a coat flat?  (Read 661 times)
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lanyu
« on: January 12, 2007 08:17:03 AM »

I need to shorten the coat I bought.  After I hemmed it by hand without showing any stitch on the right side, the thickness of the folded-in edge makes the front piece having a ditch along the bottom of the coat.  I steam ironed it and no use at all.  My stitches are not that tight.  But why it is not flat as I got from the store?
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smartygirl
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2007 11:22:42 AM »

did you fold the fabric twice (so as not to leave a raw edge on the inside)? if you have a triple-thickness of thick fabric, it will show. for thicker fabrics, it's a good idea to use binding - basically a strip of fabric (looks like ribbon or lace) that you machine-stitch to the raw edge of the coat fabric, and then you turn it up once and sew through the binding rather than the heavy fabric.

here's a crappy diagram of what i mean:

« Last Edit: January 12, 2007 01:03:28 PM by smartygirl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

paroper
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2007 03:33:52 PM »

Always press the hem.  Some coats will need a pressing cloth.  When you press the hem, press it from the wrong side.
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Sophisticated Hippie
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2007 01:07:02 PM »

The only thing I would add to smartygirl and paroper's advice is perhaps use a clapper.  A wooden block used after pressing on thick fabrics or wools to hold in the steam a bit longer for a sharp edge.  I purchased both of mine at the fabric store on the notions wall but I'm sure you could get good results from a piece of a CLEANED 4x4.
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hoxierice
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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2007 06:10:36 PM »

The only thing I would add to smartygirl and paroper's advice is perhaps use a clapper.  A wooden block used after pressing on thick fabrics or wools to hold in the steam a bit longer for a sharp edge.  I purchased both of mine at the fabric store on the notions wall but I'm sure you could get good results from a piece of a CLEANED 4x4.

Yes, clap that hem!
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smartygirl
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2007 06:44:21 AM »

ooh, i've never heard of a clapper before!
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Sophisticated Hippie
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2007 09:30:18 AM »

I hadnt used one until I started working the alterations dept of a Macy's owned store (thousands of years ago).  I had seen them but didnt realize they had an actual purpose, lol.

There are 2 links below.  The first one shows a good example of a clapper and the second does a pretty good job of explaining how to use it and the benefits.  I did do a quick search to see if I could find them online but not much luck.  I purchased mine at Fabricland (now JoAnn's) about 15 or more years ago.  They were on the notions wall near pressing hams and seam rolls.  I think they come in 2 sizes but I'm sure you could make one of your own if you have the right tools.  The only thing the picture doesnt show is that it has a wide groove on each side for easy gripping.

http://www.judisstudio.com.au/clapper.html

http://www.quiltersreview.com/article.asp?article=/tip/expert/010507_e.asp
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