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Topic: Teaching children to crochet  (Read 3296 times)
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godzilla
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« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2007 09:56:46 AM »

I was wondering what that circle loom is for. Is that finger crochet?
I have them at home, but I never really knew what to make with them. Ideas?
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« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2007 11:50:26 PM »

The circle thing is the Knifty Knitter (although they are not the only brand by any means). The resultant product looks traditionally knit, but is done by looping the yarn around the spikes and lifting the lower loop off with a hook. It is not finger crochet, which is basically just crocheting using a bent finger as the hook.
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Aphadon
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2007 06:01:20 AM »

My daughter asked me the other day to teach her to crochet, and she's 5. I was going to grab her a bright acrylic hook today in a big size and a skein of yarn at Michael's, and see what I can teach her. She needs to work on her fine motor skills, because she's having a bit of trouble with her printing, and I think this would help. Even if she can't quite get the stitches, I know she'll be very excited to learn to chain.

My friend (ex-boyfriend) has even expressed an interest in learning, although mainly to help me pump out FO for my Etsy shop *lol* Not sure I'd go for that, but it would be neat to teach him.

On the topic of the Knifty Knitter, there is a similar task that we called corking when I was growing up. A little tube with tabes (usually 4), that you wove yarn over to make a little tube, which you then sewed into something bigger. There are bigger tubes as well, for making socks and other such things. I always had fun with that, even if I never finished a project.
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« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2007 11:20:27 AM »

I believe that corking is exactly the same thing as knitting on a KK or other round knitting loom, just with a smaller number of pegs.

Anyway, just as an FYI for people interested in this, if you search for "corking" or similar topics on Amazon.com, there's a couple of children's books, including one called Corking that apparently teaches how to make a variety of homemade circular looms. This might be good for doing crafts with groups of children, since it would be cheaper than buying looms for everyone and you could make the looms whatever size you wanted. Caveat: I haven't read the book, I just happened to see it listed on Amazon months ago and thought it looked good.


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« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2007 01:26:21 PM »

I believe that corking is exactly the same thing as knitting on a KK or other round knitting loom, just with a smaller number of pegs.

Anyway, just as an FYI for people interested in this, if you search for "corking" or similar topics on Amazon.com, there's a couple of children's books, including one called Corking that apparently teaches how to make a variety of homemade circular looms. This might be good for doing crafts with groups of children, since it would be cheaper than buying looms for everyone and you could make the looms whatever size you wanted. Caveat: I haven't read the book, I just happened to see it listed on Amazon months ago and thought it looked good.




There is quite a lot of free info on the net
Just google with terms such as: corking, spool knitting, knitting nancy, knitting spool etc
Here are some links:
http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/knitting%20nancys.html
http://www.pellatuliptime.com/historical-village/history/lessons/straw/strwcork.html
http://bobscrafts.com/bobstuff/spool.htm

I have a spool knitter and also looms very similar to the KKs. They can be worked the same way, but you can also do other, more complex, stitches on the KKs. And you can make more useful things on the KKs, it just takes a little longer!
KKs take bulky yarn or two strands together. Spools usually take thin yarn. But that depends on the size and the spacing of the pegs/nails.
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« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2007 07:27:31 AM »

A couple of my girlfriends are asking me to teach their daughters to crochet. The girls see me do it all the time when we are doing our "Lady Teas" and are really interested. I want to make them a small starter kit and wonder what to put in it. I was thinking zip loc bags for holding the yarn, a couple of larger hooks, safety scissors but what else? I am not trying to spend alot just in case but what would be something nice to put in.
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« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2007 08:48:39 AM »

A couple of my girlfriends are asking me to teach their daughters to crochet. The girls see me do it all the time when we are doing our "Lady Teas" and are really interested. I want to make them a small starter kit and wonder what to put in it. I was thinking zip loc bags for holding the yarn, a couple of larger hooks, safety scissors but what else? I am not trying to spend alot just in case but what would be something nice to put in.
Hey! I don't know how handy you are with the computer, but since it's a no no anyway, I wouldn't suggest making them a DVD with some tutes (check the extensive tute list at the top of the Q and A section) OR you could make a video of you doing some simple stitches. Whenever you are teaching there are a couple things to remember; you need to tell them what you are going to do, show them (while explaining) and then let them do it. Repetition is key. Have them make a bunch of chains, then a bunch of ss's on those chains, then I would have them ch 5 and practice a bunch of turns!

Ooops, you asked what else to put in the kits... so I would print some tutes (some people do better with picture instructions, some do better with verbal), print an easy pattern (like a square tote or scarf), print some basic but fun stitches for all over patterns (like a back loop front loop alternating pattern) so there is some interesting results and you will show the diversity of crochet! I might even include one ami pattern (like octopi) since those are really easy.
Ok, hope that helps!
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« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2007 08:54:56 AM »

it was really interesting to read this because im trying to learn to crochet, but noone in my family knows how and ive been having trouble learning, mainly with the tension. I shall keep at it, especially after learning 4 yr olds can do it and i can't...how shameful! :S  Im usually an embroiderer so its a whole different world for me but i have some really good books...
if anyone has any tips on improving my tension that would be great! Smiley
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« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2007 09:05:06 AM »

I taught my 2 oldest daughters how to knit about a year ago (ages 10 and 7 at the time). Now that all their Bratz and My Scene dolls have plently of blankets  Grin they begged me to teach them to crochet the other day. My now-8-year-old got it in about an hour but my now 11-year-old gave up and walked away. NOW I have to try to encourage her BIG time that she WILL get it and not to feel like a failure.  (ohhhh, the joys of motherhood  Wink Wink )

I was taught how to knit and crochet when I was about 6-7 years old.  It was soooo much fun to make clothes for my dolls, even though a few of them didn't quite turn out how I had envisioned, it was still such a rush to know that I had made them!
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« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2007 09:18:04 AM »

it was really interesting to read this because im trying to learn to crochet, but noone in my family knows how and ive been having trouble learning, mainly with the tension. I shall keep at it, especially after learning 4 yr olds can do it and i can't...how shameful! :S  Im usually an embroiderer so its a whole different world for me but i have some really good books...
if anyone has any tips on improving my tension that would be great! Smiley
Make sure you are using the suggested size hook for the yarn. Also, as much as I hate to say it, make some swatches! You can get your rythm down, it's good practice, and you get to 'know' the yarn you are working with! Another thing, make sure your yarn is unwinding steadily, that it doesn't get stuck on it's self... if you can get a good center pull hank from the store great! But often I find there is always a mass of tangles right in the middle of a project and I have to stop and untangle! Grrr... so I try to always wind my yarn into balls, that way I know what to expect!!! Oh, and practice, practice, practice!!! (I was in band, and this one time,, at band camp,  Grin , no really, my band instructor had a poster on the wall that said;

Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect!

And that makes perfect sense if you think about it... practice swatches, don't just practice on a new scarf... practice with the right hook, practice sometimes means repetition so you own a particular stitch ,or in your case a consistent guage!
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