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Topic: Teaching children to crochet  (Read 3291 times)
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baby-bumblebee
« on: January 06, 2007 03:23:45 PM »

How old do you think is a good age to start to teach a child to crochet? Also how do you think would be the best way to go about it?Huh

My dd wants to learn but she is only 5 and cannot tie her shoes yet. She is close but I am not sure if she would get the crochet thing or not.

Amy
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IamSusie
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2007 03:38:08 PM »

I have the same question.  My daughter wants to learn, but we tried it and it was just total frustration for her.  She is only 6 and I told her we'd try again when she is about 8. 
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R3n331
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2007 03:56:07 PM »

i think 5 is a great age to start learning,
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IamSusie
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2007 04:39:08 PM »

Quote
i think 5 is a great age to start learning,

Did you learn at age 5? or have you taught 5 year olds crochet? My 5 year old was too young and lacked the fine motor skills at that age.   She can do whipstitch embroidery though.
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R3n331
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2007 04:40:17 PM »

No Susie but my son was 5 Smiley
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IamSusie
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2007 05:05:39 PM »

I'd love to see what your sweet crafty son crochets  Smiley

What hook size and yarn did you start him off with?
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R3n331
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2007 05:09:50 PM »

I gave him a Q
it fit in his hand, Ill go drag out what he made Smiley
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« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2007 05:20:43 PM »

I  think  each  child  is  different  my 6 year old  son  can  do  single and slip stitch  ,  my daughter at 7  can finally get  the half double down  with good  tension....  she  can  also slip and single......   she  learned  all that in one  weekend.   son  took to  it in a day.   it  really is the  kid and the  patience of the  teacher I think......  I  also  was teaching a  lefty (daughter)  but  I  also was  learning  at the  same time.  So  as  a 35 year old that  can only slip , single and half double,   I think I hindered  their  learning ! LOL  good  luck!
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IamSusie
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2007 05:28:46 PM »

My little cutie pie is a "young" six-and-a-half.  She still hasn't lost her first tooth and is still a bit baffled by shoe tying.  I think we'll give crochet another try before she turns 7. 

Whe I was an older kid I made a chain stitch garland out of a whole skein of rainbow yarn.  I used my finger, not a hook.  I finished it off by chaining my chain and got a more reasonable length of garland.  I did this on a long family car trip. 
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« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2007 08:01:28 PM »

I learned at 3. I made Mom *lots* of chain necklaces and then graduated on to nosewarmers when I was 5 or so.

My daughter - who is 12 now - isn't a crocheter at all. She knits (english style, while the rest of my family is cont.).

I say, let them try with no pressure. Tell them how awesome their finished projects are, and they'll want to do it because Mom is doing it.
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« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2007 09:00:06 PM »

Actually, teaching to chain with fingers is a great way to start kids learning.  They don't have to have the dexterity yet to use the hook.  I learned that way, and both my little sis and I were quite young when we graduated to hooks.
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« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2007 09:57:44 PM »

I learned at about 4, and same here, my mom had lots of chain necklaces!!! I was making barbie clothes by 5... I think using variagated yarns will help too... it helps you see your work a bit easier. You could also do a big hook and chunky yarn! I say if she wants to try go for it!
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« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2007 10:04:56 PM »

Hey all, check out the article in the latest copy of Knit 1.  It discusses how teaching children to knit and crochet may help them in school as well as improving their fine motor skills. 
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« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2007 11:10:43 PM »

Hey all, check out the article in the latest copy of Knit 1.  It discusses how teaching children to knit and crochet may help them in school as well as improving their fine motor skills. 
I TOTALLY agree with this! I know that it helped me!
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« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2007 11:56:24 PM »

okay, the greatest thing to learn on (i think, and my mom and i have taught all the little cousins as well) is a knitting mushroom. (althought it's more like crocheting than knitting) it's basically spool knitting, and it won't do much more than make long skinny tubes but i still think it's the best thing to start off on as a kid.
http://www.hearthsong.com/hearthsong/product.do?section_id=0&bc=1005&pgc=201&cm_mmc=Tagged-_-NA-_-NA-_-NA
^that is a great one from hearthsong, (which happens to be on sale i just noticed).
you can also make one from a spool i'm sure, just do a google search or something on "spool knitting" and you'll probably find a ton of tutorials.

hope that helps!

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« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2007 04:53:10 AM »

Actually, teaching to chain with fingers is a great way to start kids learning.  They don't have to have the dexterity yet to use the hook.  I learned that way, and both my little sis and I were quite young when we graduated to hooks.

This is what I learned at a young age as well. It was less frustrating and I would do miles of chain while I watched TV etc.
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Ezri_B
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2007 07:21:34 AM »

My youngest son learned to chain at age 3, he can single crochet and half double now too (he's now 6.) My older 2 I have attempted to teach, and they say they want to, but can't seem to get into it. They are 7, and 10. So it depends on the child, and their true desire. My 2 oldest are a wiz at the sewing machine, and my youngest is a fabulous embroiderer. They all have different strengths and loves, so just find theirs.
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« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2007 09:47:15 AM »

I gave him a Q
it fit in his hand, Ill go drag out what he made Smiley

waiting  not  so  patient ly to  see the  result!!  and  does  he  still do  needle  work at all??? 
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janeausten
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2007 04:18:56 PM »

im curious about how you do finger crocheting. i know how to do finger knitting but not crocheting.  do you just stick your index finger through the loop and pull the yarn through?
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IamSusie
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2007 04:32:28 PM »

I remember that you just wrap the yarn loosely around your finger twice and then pull the inside loop over the outside loop.  That's the first stich of the chain. 

Now you just continue by wraping once so you have 2 loops on your finger and again pull the inside loop over the outside one. 

I do remember that once I got started with my long finger crocheted chain, I just reached inside the loop with my fingers to pull one loop through the other one and tightened it along the way.
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baby-bumblebee
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2007 06:05:00 PM »

Thanks girls!!! I will try the finger crochet thing I think she can get this and then move on from there. Smiley

She gets so upset when she cannot get something right away. I guess I passed this onto her. For some reason crochet came really easy to me but knitting is something diffrent. I have thrown the needles and the yarn across the room, stabbed the yarn with the needle, ripped at the yarn like a wild animal all because it would not do like the book showed. I think I might be able to cast on now!!! Smiley


I remeber doing the finger croceht thing but did not until you girls said something about it. Man that was years ago.

Amy
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janeausten
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2007 06:28:36 PM »

finger crochet sounds pretty easy. i know just the kid to teach it too.  Wink  thanks!
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MopTopStumptown
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2007 06:35:19 PM »

i learned at 5 and also made tons of chains.  i'd just go back and forth and back and forth until i'd run out of yarn. then my mom would pick up a different color of cheap yarn for $2 and keep me entertained for another week.
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glittergirl94
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2007 06:45:01 PM »

I've done finger crocheting with my preschool class(ages 3 all the way up to 6(kindergarten half day kids) and they've always been very sucessful!  It's a great fine motor skill activity, especially for those that need a little... boost?  I give them light colored chunky yarn at first, it's easier that way.  Plus, I get to crochet while I work; bonus for everyone!
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« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2007 07:49:35 PM »

My son is four and wants to learn how to knit.  I don't think he's ready yet, but I do tie a little slip knot onto my size Q crochet hook and let him play with it.   Smiley
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2007 12:58:57 AM »

We homeschool and I require my kids to learn handcrafts.

I taught my 9yo (10 in a couple of weeks), how to crochet last summer. He made a few projects with a good attitude, but not much enthusiasm. Then he realized amigurumi was crochet. He is now a very enthusiastic crocheting fool. He prefers Japanese charted patterns and is always bugging me about when I am going to order more books. Since he cannot find a cow pattern that he likes, he has asked me to help him design his own Smiley He just finished a fish, and started an octopus today.

I recently bought my 5yo son a knifty knitter set. He picked it up very quickly. He can crochet a chain with a hook, but he has trouble with it. Since he can sit the knitting loom down on a desk while he manipulates the yarn it is much easier for him to coordinate. I taught him to make finger chains when he was 3, but he is not satisfied with "just a chain" now. He wants to make real projects like hats and stuffed kitties. I think the knifty knitter is a good gateway skill to both knitting and crochet.

My husband wants to learn to crochet now, but he is a much more difficult student than our sons.
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2007 09:42:21 AM »

My son is not even two yet, and he already wants to learn crochet. Little theif-y steals my projects when I set them down and tries to work the hook. When he's especially persistant, I set him up with a half finished afghan (all loose ends tied off), a long hank of yarn, and a large hook. He can't figure out how to make it work yet, but he likes to try.

Maybe in a few more months we'll sit down and get into the business of really learning this thing. Right now, he doesn't have the patience to listen to Mommy teach. Smiley
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« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2007 10:36:01 AM »

I am trying to teach my daughters to knit and crochet whilst I learn all at the same time! LMAO Cheesy I might go n check out the knifty knitter as suggested. Cheesy Are these available in craft stores? I like requiring my girls to do one medium handwork/craft per week. Cheesy I think it brings out their creativity and shuts off the want of the tv Grin LOL Smiley They are 5 & 7 and already use the sewing machine almost daily! Cheesy My seven year old wants to make her first shirt.... I am debating it Grin lol Smiley I am also trying to teach them more 'old fashioned' things Cheesy Such as canning, gardening, knitting, crocheting and anything else I can think of Cheesy I DON'T MEAN TO OFFEND ANYONE BY CALLING IT 'OLD FASHIONED' LOL Cheesy But that is how my mom looked at it Embarrassed I hate that I grew up not knowing any of this  Undecided But you live and you learn, and I already have a mounding list growing of things that they absolutely must know! Cheesy
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« Reply #28 on: January 11, 2007 11:45:06 AM »

Walmart and Joanns here both carry the knifty Knitter. There are no other crafty places her, so I do not know about places like Michaels. My LYS has wooden looms that are similar, but available in a wider range of sizes.

Here is my little guy starting a project on his. I crocheted the sweater he is wearing:)

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« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2007 12:22:31 PM »

Hi - I have definately seen the knifty knitter at Michael's.  It is on Sale sometimes too!   Smiley
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« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2007 09:56:46 AM »

I was wondering what that circle loom is for. Is that finger crochet?
I have them at home, but I never really knew what to make with them. Ideas?
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« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2007 11:50:26 PM »

The circle thing is the Knifty Knitter (although they are not the only brand by any means). The resultant product looks traditionally knit, but is done by looping the yarn around the spikes and lifting the lower loop off with a hook. It is not finger crochet, which is basically just crocheting using a bent finger as the hook.
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Aphadon
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2007 06:01:20 AM »

My daughter asked me the other day to teach her to crochet, and she's 5. I was going to grab her a bright acrylic hook today in a big size and a skein of yarn at Michael's, and see what I can teach her. She needs to work on her fine motor skills, because she's having a bit of trouble with her printing, and I think this would help. Even if she can't quite get the stitches, I know she'll be very excited to learn to chain.

My friend (ex-boyfriend) has even expressed an interest in learning, although mainly to help me pump out FO for my Etsy shop *lol* Not sure I'd go for that, but it would be neat to teach him.

On the topic of the Knifty Knitter, there is a similar task that we called corking when I was growing up. A little tube with tabes (usually 4), that you wove yarn over to make a little tube, which you then sewed into something bigger. There are bigger tubes as well, for making socks and other such things. I always had fun with that, even if I never finished a project.
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« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2007 11:20:27 AM »

I believe that corking is exactly the same thing as knitting on a KK or other round knitting loom, just with a smaller number of pegs.

Anyway, just as an FYI for people interested in this, if you search for "corking" or similar topics on Amazon.com, there's a couple of children's books, including one called Corking that apparently teaches how to make a variety of homemade circular looms. This might be good for doing crafts with groups of children, since it would be cheaper than buying looms for everyone and you could make the looms whatever size you wanted. Caveat: I haven't read the book, I just happened to see it listed on Amazon months ago and thought it looked good.


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« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2007 01:26:21 PM »

I believe that corking is exactly the same thing as knitting on a KK or other round knitting loom, just with a smaller number of pegs.

Anyway, just as an FYI for people interested in this, if you search for "corking" or similar topics on Amazon.com, there's a couple of children's books, including one called Corking that apparently teaches how to make a variety of homemade circular looms. This might be good for doing crafts with groups of children, since it would be cheaper than buying looms for everyone and you could make the looms whatever size you wanted. Caveat: I haven't read the book, I just happened to see it listed on Amazon months ago and thought it looked good.




There is quite a lot of free info on the net
Just google with terms such as: corking, spool knitting, knitting nancy, knitting spool etc
Here are some links:
http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/knitting%20nancys.html
http://www.pellatuliptime.com/historical-village/history/lessons/straw/strwcork.html
http://bobscrafts.com/bobstuff/spool.htm

I have a spool knitter and also looms very similar to the KKs. They can be worked the same way, but you can also do other, more complex, stitches on the KKs. And you can make more useful things on the KKs, it just takes a little longer!
KKs take bulky yarn or two strands together. Spools usually take thin yarn. But that depends on the size and the spacing of the pegs/nails.
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« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2007 07:27:31 AM »

A couple of my girlfriends are asking me to teach their daughters to crochet. The girls see me do it all the time when we are doing our "Lady Teas" and are really interested. I want to make them a small starter kit and wonder what to put in it. I was thinking zip loc bags for holding the yarn, a couple of larger hooks, safety scissors but what else? I am not trying to spend alot just in case but what would be something nice to put in.
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« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2007 08:48:39 AM »

A couple of my girlfriends are asking me to teach their daughters to crochet. The girls see me do it all the time when we are doing our "Lady Teas" and are really interested. I want to make them a small starter kit and wonder what to put in it. I was thinking zip loc bags for holding the yarn, a couple of larger hooks, safety scissors but what else? I am not trying to spend alot just in case but what would be something nice to put in.
Hey! I don't know how handy you are with the computer, but since it's a no no anyway, I wouldn't suggest making them a DVD with some tutes (check the extensive tute list at the top of the Q and A section) OR you could make a video of you doing some simple stitches. Whenever you are teaching there are a couple things to remember; you need to tell them what you are going to do, show them (while explaining) and then let them do it. Repetition is key. Have them make a bunch of chains, then a bunch of ss's on those chains, then I would have them ch 5 and practice a bunch of turns!

Ooops, you asked what else to put in the kits... so I would print some tutes (some people do better with picture instructions, some do better with verbal), print an easy pattern (like a square tote or scarf), print some basic but fun stitches for all over patterns (like a back loop front loop alternating pattern) so there is some interesting results and you will show the diversity of crochet! I might even include one ami pattern (like octopi) since those are really easy.
Ok, hope that helps!
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« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2007 08:54:56 AM »

it was really interesting to read this because im trying to learn to crochet, but noone in my family knows how and ive been having trouble learning, mainly with the tension. I shall keep at it, especially after learning 4 yr olds can do it and i can't...how shameful! :S  Im usually an embroiderer so its a whole different world for me but i have some really good books...
if anyone has any tips on improving my tension that would be great! Smiley
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« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2007 09:05:06 AM »

I taught my 2 oldest daughters how to knit about a year ago (ages 10 and 7 at the time). Now that all their Bratz and My Scene dolls have plently of blankets  Grin they begged me to teach them to crochet the other day. My now-8-year-old got it in about an hour but my now 11-year-old gave up and walked away. NOW I have to try to encourage her BIG time that she WILL get it and not to feel like a failure.  (ohhhh, the joys of motherhood  Wink Wink )

I was taught how to knit and crochet when I was about 6-7 years old.  It was soooo much fun to make clothes for my dolls, even though a few of them didn't quite turn out how I had envisioned, it was still such a rush to know that I had made them!
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« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2007 09:18:04 AM »

it was really interesting to read this because im trying to learn to crochet, but noone in my family knows how and ive been having trouble learning, mainly with the tension. I shall keep at it, especially after learning 4 yr olds can do it and i can't...how shameful! :S  Im usually an embroiderer so its a whole different world for me but i have some really good books...
if anyone has any tips on improving my tension that would be great! Smiley
Make sure you are using the suggested size hook for the yarn. Also, as much as I hate to say it, make some swatches! You can get your rythm down, it's good practice, and you get to 'know' the yarn you are working with! Another thing, make sure your yarn is unwinding steadily, that it doesn't get stuck on it's self... if you can get a good center pull hank from the store great! But often I find there is always a mass of tangles right in the middle of a project and I have to stop and untangle! Grrr... so I try to always wind my yarn into balls, that way I know what to expect!!! Oh, and practice, practice, practice!!! (I was in band, and this one time,, at band camp,  Grin , no really, my band instructor had a poster on the wall that said;

Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect!

And that makes perfect sense if you think about it... practice swatches, don't just practice on a new scarf... practice with the right hook, practice sometimes means repetition so you own a particular stitch ,or in your case a consistent guage!
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« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2007 03:16:17 PM »

thank you for your advise Smiley . i guess ill keep swatching...where can i find out what hook is suitable for what yarn?
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« Reply #41 on: February 21, 2007 06:07:50 PM »

thank you for your advise Smiley . i guess ill keep swatching...where can i find out what hook is suitable for what yarn?
OH! Good question, because it took me a while to realize that on the wrapper of the yarn, it usually says the size knitting needles or crochet hook you need, and some even tell you the guage you should get too, so like size G hook  10 sts X 4 rows = 1 square inch (Or whatever) so that also can give you a 'goal' tension too. I would even maybe suggest buying a yarn that has all that info. There are some really inexpensive yarns like Caron Simply Soft (I think) that have this on the label. Smiley
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IamSusie
« Reply #42 on: February 21, 2007 08:48:34 PM »

Quote
Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect!

This is so true!  When you try really hard to get it right, it takes forever at first, but eventually your fingers start to remember what to do and it all gets easier and your stitches start to look consistent.
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white trash hero
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2007 12:15:02 PM »

thank you so much, i better make sure we have something simlar in england i cant wait to go yarn shopping on monday now Smiley i have one hook ...ill have to get a couple other si think cos it seems tiny :S
but cheers me dears you have been amazingly helpful!
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