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Topic: Can you block or iron acrylic yarn?  (Read 2511 times)
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kitty1256
« on: January 01, 2007 09:32:12 AM »

I am knitting this purse (in 5 pieces then sewing it together), but I finished the front piece, and it is all wonky and needs to either be blocked (that's what my mom said...I've never done it before), or even just ironed out or something.  However, it is made out of acrylic yarn.  Can you iron acrylic yarn?  Or can you block it (whatever that means)?
Thanks!
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soozeq
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2007 09:55:39 AM »

Acrylic doesn't block in the way that wool blocks, but you can wash and dry it and the stitches will even out. Wait until you have all of it done and seamed together, then throw it in the machine.

sue
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sue
kitty1256
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2007 10:12:12 AM »

can i just iron it, or will that wreck it?  like if i press it on a really low setting?
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knitbit
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2007 11:08:34 AM »

Do not iron it!  Acrylic will melt if you apply that kind of heat to it.  You may ruin your iron as well.
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elijor
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2007 11:14:00 AM »

I have help a freind straighten out or "sort of block" an acrylic scarf before. What we did was pin it out to the correct shape on the ironing board (you could use a towel), then fill a good steam iron up with water and turn it to steam, hold the iron ABOVE the knitting a steam, let sit till dry.

A couple of things to think about:
A - don't touch the iron to the yarn - it will melt and make a mess.
B - the yarn became much softer - this was a plus for her as it was a scarf - that could be bad for you if you need the body/stiffness of the yarn.

Hope this helps.
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kitty1256
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2007 12:12:34 PM »

Okay, so maybe this yarn isn't acrylic....I thought that's what it is called...the really super cheap crap that you can get at walmart for like $2 for a skein of it....I decided to knit up a test patch and iron it (not cause I don't believe ya'll, but because I wanted to see if it would really melt...I am wierd like that, and my iron is crap anyway), and It didn't melt or anything...it just got a little flat.  So is that cheap yarn not acrylic?
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elijor
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2007 12:20:23 PM »

Probably it is acrylic or some sort of petroleum based fiber. It probably did not melt because of the temperature of the iron. If the iron is hot enuf and you hesitate in one spot it will melt. OK - not into a puddle but it will stick to the iron and have hard spots (like melted plastic).
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soozeq
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2007 01:11:26 PM »

It probably is acrylic because that's about all Walmart sells except for a few wool blends like Woolease. It may not melt with just a light touch of the iron, but if you had it on high and left it, it might fuse together a little.

But anyway, you can sort of steam it, or like I said, wash and dry it and the stitches will even out more.

sue
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sue
meriellyn
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2007 01:22:52 PM »

With acrylic, I usually take the wash and dry approach but if you need to straighten some stuff out before sewing up, you can wash it, then lay/pin it out flat until dry and get it a little more straightened out. Won't block quite like wool would but you can straighten it out a bit.
I haven't tried the steaming thing yet. I hear that even a good steaming can "kill" acrylic by making it totally limp and this limpness is irreversable. I guess that'd be ok if you were going for a lot of drape but for something like a sweater, it'd probably make it hang weird.
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elijor
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2007 05:12:21 PM »

I hear that even a good steaming can "kill" acrylic by making it totally limp and this limpness is irreversable.
Yepper - that is what I meant by
Quote
B - the yarn became much softer -
Limp is deffinately a more accurate discription - but it was also softer which was a plus for her simple garter stitch scarf but maybe not so if she had done cables or something.
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