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Topic: Share a technique  (Read 110910 times)
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indigo_roses
« Reply #780 on: October 03, 2011 05:24:52 PM »

I've made one fabric ATC, what I did was mount it on a piece of felt.
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« Reply #781 on: October 03, 2011 05:35:10 PM »

How do you finish fabric ATCs?  Cut them and affix to front of stiff surface?  Sew them into a little pouch with the stiff surface inside?  Just cut larger than the card and affix it to the back after folding it over the edges?  I'd appreciate any ideas....

I like to use some kind of iron on glue (Steam-a-Seam is what I use.  And for cards I use the heavy duty one.)  Then I have ironed it on to felt and cardboard as well.  Make it a bit larger and then trim to the size you need.  You could also sew it to felt by hand or machine too.  If it is a mini quilt kind of thing, I would put the right sides together (with batting on the outside of one side if you want batting), sew most of the way around, then flip and quilt.  Hope that helps Grin
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« Reply #782 on: October 03, 2011 09:29:38 PM »

How do you finish fabric ATCs?  Cut them and affix to front of stiff surface?  Sew them into a little pouch with the stiff surface inside?  Just cut larger than the card and affix it to the back after folding it over the edges?  I'd appreciate any ideas....

I like to use some kind of iron on glue (Steam-a-Seam is what I use.  And for cards I use the heavy duty one.)  Then I have ironed it on to felt and cardboard as well.  Make it a bit larger and then trim to the size you need.  You could also sew it to felt by hand or machine too.  If it is a mini quilt kind of thing, I would put the right sides together (with batting on the outside of one side if you want batting), sew most of the way around, then flip and quilt.  Hope that helps Grin

I second the fusible web (Steam-A-Seam or whichever brand). Since it has a paper backing, I've ironed the back of fabric cards to the fusible side, then left the paper backing on it, so I could write my info on it, and then the recipient has the option of removing the paper and using the card as an iron-on patch, or leaving it as-is.  Smiley
Another technique that's worked for me is having the fabric a little larger than needed (say, 4x3 inches), then wrap the extra fabric around the edges of a stiff ATC-sized card, gluing the fabric edges to the back of the stiff surface. This requires little binder clips to hold the fabric in place until the glue dries. If adhesive isn't your cup-o-tea, you could wrap the edges around the stiff card and run it all through a sewing machine, creating a border of stitches.
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« Reply #783 on: November 14, 2011 09:22:05 AM »

 Mine is very simply but I love it. I use ink wash for background and most of the coloring, I use micron Pens to draw my Abes.
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« Reply #784 on: May 21, 2013 07:15:18 PM »

This is a fantastic thread! I had to stop reading 'cause my head was spinning with ideas.

I make my own blanks. I keep a piece of watercolor paper next to my painting area and anytime I have left over paint on my paper plate palette (I find the small party size paper plates make excellent paint palettes) I smear the paint in patterns on the watercolor paper. I'm just looking for texture/color/design. I like to finish with layers of gel or mod podge with a bit of metallic paint mixed in. Again, no plan, just texture etc. Sometimes I M.P bits of fabric or ribbon or thread or flower petals or torn paper or bits of book pages (you get the idea) as well. I test stamps on the paper too. Anything goes.

Then I cut to ATC size and keep in a box to grab for backgrounds, texture, etc. It gives me a stash to work with.

Examples:



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« Reply #785 on: May 22, 2013 05:47:58 AM »

That's a great tip! Your cards look beautiful.
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« Reply #786 on: July 18, 2013 03:21:01 PM »

So after taking 3 or 4 days on-and-off to read through the entire thread, I decided that I, too, had to get on the tape transfer bandwagon.  Since my initial results were a bit disappointing, I wanted to pass along my observations for the sake of others who want to give this a try after reading this.

Here are the results of my first attempt:



Maybe I went a little overboard, heheh.  The vast majority of these were taken from the Current, a free local culture mag printed on what I would call newspaper-style, err... paper.  They are sitting on wax paper, on top of my white crafting table.  I figure this is pretty much the most high-contrast background possible, so just be aware that most of the images are much fainter when you put any other kind of background behind them. (BTW, the wax paper for storage is a must.  I was tricked into thinking that the tackiness of my tape had "washed off", since it felt completely slick on both sides when I pulled it out of the warm water.  Imagine my surprise when I pulled them off of the paper towel where I had laid them to dry, only to have white bits of tuft now attached to the backs of my once-again-very-sticky tape pieces.)



The four nautical images in the bottom left corner are from the cover of the free news mag, and they are the only really strong images I got from it.  Pieces from the inside of the mag came out much weaker.



Nevertheless, I think I can do something real cool with this one.



The top row of four images are from a J. Crew catalogue I had sitting around.  Not only was the transfer quality vastly superior, but the paper was waaaay easier to take off.  In fact, some of the transfers actually peeled away from their paper completely while soaking in the water -- I didn't have to do anything!

I don't know if the catalogue produced better images than the news mag because of the kind of paper used, or the quality of the printing process (or both), but I would recommend that you try doing one or two samples from a bunch of different kinds of paper before going hog-wild cutting out a ton of images from one source that may not come out as nice as you'd like.

Still, I managed to get a few decent images from the news mag pages:



Black text on a white background will transfer well from this kind of paper, and illustrations with solid blocks of color might be okay too.  Most of the color photographs were a miss, though, so I would recommend cutting those out directly if you want to use them on a card.

If you found this thread and read alllll the way from the first page, congrats!  Cheesy
« Last Edit: July 18, 2013 03:27:47 PM by vincentvanbuck » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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    « Reply #787 on: July 19, 2013 07:34:52 AM »

    Thanks for the new info! It's been a long time since I attempted a tape transfer, but you've made me want to give it a go again.
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    « Reply #788 on: July 26, 2013 10:32:53 AM »

    Quality of ink, paper and image will make a big difference.
    • Magazines are great, good quality images and if the paper is coated (has a smooth or shiny surface) the ink sits more on top and therefore transfers to the tape better.
    • If it is newspaper, low quality paper or uncoated, the ink soaks into the paper more and comes out lighter.
    • Also the ability to remove all the paper from the tape depends on the paper you start with.

    We used to make these when I was in high school by using clear contact paper.
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