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Topic: what's your favourite knitting tip or trick?  (Read 60059 times)
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ax174
« Reply #110 on: February 17, 2005 06:54:35 AM »

This is a *nice* tip - it's for doing symmetrical bind-offs, e.g.

    BO 5 sts at beg of next 6 rows.

You would do this for sweater shoulders or, more recently for me, making the pixie hat from Amy Singer's Knit Wit book.

If you follow the pattern exactly and just bind off the stitches at the beginnings of the rows, you end up with steps.

To replace the jagged steps with a smooth, angled side,

   BO 5 sts at beg of the 1st row. Work until 2 sts remain.  k2tog these last sts.
  *BO 4 sts at beg of next row (you already decreased by 1 st when you did the k2tog on the last row).  Work until 2 sts remain.  k2tog these last sts.
   Rep from * for the rest of the BO rows.

Hope that makes sense.  You need to try it to see how well it works - it really is worth trying!


« Last Edit: February 17, 2005 06:56:52 AM by ax174 » THIS ROCKS   Logged

starlings
« Reply #111 on: February 17, 2005 07:36:55 AM »

This is a *nice* tip - it's for doing symmetrical bind-offs, e.g.

If you follow the pattern exactly and just bind off the stitches at the beginnings of the rows, you end up with steps.

To replace the jagged steps with a smooth, angled side...

You might also want to consider using short rows in a case like this. They work beautifully on shoulders and are completely invisible:

Step 1: *Work the stitches you're supposed to bind off in pattern instead. Place a marker. Finish working the row.
Step 2: Begin the next row as above. Work up to the previous row's marker in pattern, then slip the first stitch past the marker purlwise, wrap and turn.
Step 3: Slip the first st purlwise with yarn in back. Then work from * in step one. Remember that the  "bind off" stitches begin with the first stitch past the one you just slipped.

Once you've disposed of all of the "bind off" stitches in this way, knit a row across all of the stitches, picking up the wraps and knitting them with the stitch above so that they blend into the fabric. You can either bind off at this point or graft these stitches.
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ax174
« Reply #112 on: February 18, 2005 05:36:16 AM »


You might also want to consider using short rows in a case like this.


By George, that would work!  I'm so psyched I MUST make another pixie hat so I can try it. Thanks!

Here's a tip someone showed me the other evening for an easy provisional cast-on. 

Cast on the required number of sts with waste yarn, and knit a row or two.  Cut the waste yarn.  On the next row, start the pattern with the good yarn.  When you are ready to take out the provisional cast-on, slip a needle through the first row of the good yarn, then snip the waste yarn anywhere and frog it out.

« Last Edit: February 18, 2005 06:34:32 AM by ax174 » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #113 on: February 21, 2005 08:02:17 PM »

I don't know if this is a "like, duh" idea, but I make my center-pull yarn balls on a wooden cooking spoon.
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« Reply #114 on: February 22, 2005 07:24:06 AM »

If you are working with a lace or repeat pattern, write down your each repeat numbered on a piece of paper so you can glance at the ONE row repeat rather than the whole pattern so you don't accidentally knit the same row 2x or accidentally skip a row.
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« Reply #115 on: February 22, 2005 08:03:54 AM »

In that vein, if you're doing lace or cables, put stitch markers on either side of each panel/repeat.  For lace, this makes it easier to see if you've added or lost a stitch (and exactly where it happened).  For cables, it makes it easier to go on auto pilot and just let the cables travel back and forth to the edges of the panel.  Once you've got a few repeats of the pattern down, you can just look at what you've done to see where you're going and not have to check the written pattern.
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« Reply #116 on: February 22, 2005 08:57:23 PM »

adding on to the keeping track of patterns things (hope no one mentioned this yet, if so, i'll delete this post!).  i got this from maggie righetti - you either can cut out of scrap paper or use index cards to make little "books" to keep track of a stitch pattern.  punch holes and tie with yarn to make a quickie flip book.  on the first page you put the pattern name, where you found it, stitch number/repeat.  next page you put in big print:  ROW 1:  KNIT 7, *KNIT 3, PURL 3, YO, K2TOG*" (or whatever, i'm just making it up) and the next page you write out row 2, and you can flip through the book over and over again.  it makes it easy to leave off someplace and pick back up again, instead of trying to guess where you are.  plus you still have those little books around next time you want to do the pattern, and making the "book" turns out to be a fun little "project" to do before you start the knitting!

ps - ookpik, the counting backwards for keeping track of rows is AWESOME, THANK YOU!  Grin
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subloke
« Reply #117 on: February 25, 2005 08:23:39 AM »

I love the idea of the book!  Then of course, I would need to make some sort of storage for the little books, which could be another knitting project... 

Do you add a "page" to document the final product or the guage swatch/yarn specs?  That would really make it a good resource for the next time. 

Thanks for that tip!
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starlings
« Reply #118 on: February 26, 2005 10:42:33 AM »

After seeing it recommended over and over again by Joan Shrouder (a great knitting authority and problem-solver) on lists here and there, I finally tried this yesterday:

Instead of fishing around inside a skein for the end, possibly pulling out the guts, just turn the whole skein inside-out. You begin by spreading the core with your fingers until it's wide enough, then you just work one end inwards until the whole thing is reversed. It really is amazing.
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t1g3rl1ly
« Reply #119 on: March 01, 2005 09:53:42 PM »

Instead of fishing around inside a skein for the end, possibly pulling out the guts, just turn the whole skein inside-out. You begin by spreading the core with your fingers until it's wide enough, then you just work one end inwards until the whole thing is reversed. It really is amazing.

I am so gonna try that on my next skein...because I ALWAYS pull the guts out!  Angry
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