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Topic: Bake time---polymer clay beads and charms  (Read 1010 times)
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slb2724
« on: October 28, 2006 01:33:37 PM »

i have beads from 1 cm to 4 cm, charms that are super thin and one that is 1.5 cm thick. i have an altoids tin covered, and some rings i made with scrap. i have no brand name. any suggestions to bake times/temps?
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Diane B.
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2006 05:18:35 PM »

Quote
i have beads from 1 cm to 4 cm,
charms that are super thin
and one that is 1.5 cm thick.
i have an altoids tin covered (no thickness indicated)
and some rings i made with scrap (no thickness indicated).
....i have no brand name. any suggestions to bake times/temps?

Are you asking for times and temps for each of those separately
Without brand names that can be a little difficult, but if you use one of the "enclosed," or partly-enclosed baking methods**, you should come out okay for any of the brands at its proper baking temp.  I'd say maybe stick with 265 degrees (well measured and watched with an oven thermometer), since you might have some Fimo (Premo and Sculpey would be 275 and Kato up to 325)... I think Cernit may be 265 too, but not sure. (...for high altitudes, those temps should be higher)

1 cm is a little less than half an inch, 4 cm is a little over 1.5 inches, and 1.5 cm is a little more than half an inch.  You can bake them all according to general directions which is 15-20 min for 1/4" (I'd say up to about 3/4"... then add 15 min or so for 1.5" thick).

"Super-thin" is hard to define, so I'd say maybe 10-15 min only (and protected, as above, while baking). 
BTW, if the "enclosure" you use is thick enough, etc., to keep the clay from being heated as quickly as it would have under normal conditions, you'll need to add that extra time to the baking time.  Most clays (even thin ones) can handle longer heat than is needed as long as they are protected so that the heat really won't go any higher than that, but baking too short a time can result in underbaking problems. 

You'll also want to bake on something insulated from the bottom just in case the items are too close to the bottom coils too so will go higher than 265... a few suggestions would be baking on polyester batting, or a wad of tissues, e.g.

**check on this page for enclosed and partly-enclosed baking methods, as well as times-temps recommended for brands, etc.:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/baking.htm
(...look under Darkening, Burning and Times/Temps)

Good luck!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2006 05:20:09 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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slb2724
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2006 11:57:47 AM »

well i still couldnt find a brand, but i used you bake time info and they came out perfectly. thanks bunches. and since you are a p.c. god, do you know the name of any gloss that you can use to make the clay shiny? it doesnt have to be high end or anything, i just wantmy clay to not be so dull....
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Diane B.
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2006 03:43:44 PM »

Quote
do you know the name of any gloss that you can use to make the clay shiny? it doesnt have to be high end or anything, i just wantmy clay to not be so dull....

Well, there are various liquids you can use to get anything from a matte finish, to a sheen, to a high-gloss shine. 
There are also other ways to get a sheen (e.g., sanding, then hand-buffing).
And there are other ways to get a high gloss shine (e.g. sanding, then buffing with something electric).

Which you use will depend partly on which effect you want, and which materials/techniques you want to use.

Most new clayers use a liquid finish only, so you might want to start with that.  There are ones that are sold specifically for polymer clay (like Fimo's varnish in 4 versions, or Sculpey's "Glaze" which is really thick and goopy, for example), but most clayers probably use either Rustoleum's Diamond Varathane (Gloss), or Future floor polish (one or more coats, depending on the shine desired) because they do as good, or better, a job** and they're far cheaper by volume. 

Check out this page for lots of info on all those, plus even more possibilities for glossy sealers-finishes on polymer clay, and how to use them:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm


**well, except maybe for Fimo's version that's alcohol-based and gloss, which is really excellent but also very expensive by volume

HTH,

Diane B.

 
« Last Edit: October 29, 2006 03:46:35 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
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http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2006 08:38:57 AM »

Future is great to use.  I have an ancient bottle of it, and it works spectacularly.  Smells a bit in the bottle (it is OLD), but is easy to clean up and has a nice sheen.  I really should invest a couple of bucks in a new, less smelly, bottle.  It doesn't smell once it is dry, though.

Before I used Future, I had some Sculpey Glaze.  It worked fine, but was way too expensive and started to smell like rotten fish (weird!).  The lid didn't seal well, either, so it dried up and got really goopy. 

For just light buffing of surfaces, a nail buffer is nice to have.  Get one of those little foam rectangles with the 4 different surfaces.  Mine was $1 from Target.  Once you have used the 4 sides, rub it on your jeans to get a nice sheen.
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SupernovaDesigns
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2006 07:52:19 PM »

I wish i could find the future polish.
for the love of goodness don't make the mistake of wasting your money on sculpey glaze.

a nail buffer, how clever!!
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