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Topic: Are people pricing right on Etsy?  (Read 10917 times)
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Lyrelle
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2006 01:27:03 PM »

I completely agree with Sue - I have *no* idea what I should be pricing my items at. So I've looked around on etsy to see what other people are doing, and priced accordingly (I hope, I think), but that factors in the low-prices-because-of-crafty-audience factor.

Based on what I've seen at craft shows, I'd probably double my etsy prices if I were to sell at one.

But I do wish there was a better way of pricing my things than just guessing - the supplies + time doesn't work well for me, either . . .
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Kitty Vane
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« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2006 03:51:08 AM »

I know I price my items too low on Etsy, as I only charge for materials & shipping right now.
When I set up shop on Etsy, I browsed all through the relevant category and looked at what price others were selling their work at and then based my prices on that. I'd love to charge more so I could get my costs covered, but I'm also afraid that were I to raise my prices to what they really should be I'd lose customers by charging more than people normally do for similar stuff.
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max
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« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2006 04:27:08 AM »

I am also mystified by the etsy buying process. I make purses, accessories and clothes and I've sold 1 item in the 10 months or so I've been on etsy. I look at listings similar to mine and some sell hundreds of like items at prices much higher than mine. So I am trying to figure out the difference. Is it the colors, the styles, the professionalism of the site, the way the pictures are taken, the description, etc?Huh I'm not sure. I love making things from recycled neckties but I'm beginning to think I'm the only one who likes them. lol
Oh well I guess I'll keep trying until I decide to stop but it is a bit frustrating.
max
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PinkyK
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« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2006 10:02:23 AM »

Here is how I go about pricing my items...

I add up all of the costs including the ACTUAL shipping costs. Most times I get killed on shipping.

Then I look on ETSY for similar items and see what they cost and how may of them have sold at this price....call it poor man's market research.

Then I set my price so I get as much profit as the market can take.

As an etsy buyer I'll typically buy something "I have to have" or from someone I "know" from the forums here or on etsy. 

I look in the Treasury and Time Machine and if something catches my eye.....it's just a couple of clicks and it arrvies a few days later.

If I'm going to buy supplies on-line I'll buy them from an etsy seller unless they are substantially more. I figure if I'm going to buy something anyway why not support fellow etsy-ans.

I do have a touch of "I can make that" syndrome. But it isn't too bad.
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CraftyChef
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« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2006 05:34:07 AM »

It's unfortunate that people don't charge what the cost of supplies/time is, because this creates an unrealistic picture of what a handmade item really costs. If you get people used to low prices, they squawk that much harder when faced with a realistic price.

On the other hand, you can get the price you're looking for if you market your butt off. Etsy is just a convenient storefront, after all. It's up to each individual shop owner to market their particular corner of the shop and get sales.
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K_lox
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2006 10:24:14 AM »

This thread is great. I'm going to get started on etsy soon, and have been having some dilemmas about pricing.

It gets frustrating when I ask my non-crafting friends what they'd pay for an amigurumi that took me hours to make. I've gotten responses that range from $5 (!!!) to $15, when the norm I see for similar items on etsy is $15-30. Their rationale is that it is a small item and "if beanie babies cost 5 dollars, then why shouldn't the amigurumi you made cost 5 dollars?"  Embarrassed

I think a good thing to keep in mind that a lot of etsy buyers are "craft-aware" themselves and understand how much work it takes to craft.

One question, how much does size matter in pricing? For example, if I had a 5 inch tall amigurumi and a 8 inch one, would buyers expect the 5 inch to be a lower price even if they took the same amount of work?
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tiph_thompson
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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2006 04:40:50 PM »

One question, how much does size matter in pricing? For example, if I had a 5 inch tall amigurumi and a 8 inch one, would buyers expect the 5 inch to be a lower price even if they took the same amount of work?

I've had a hard time with just this issue - i make little stuffies and some other things, and often the littlest ones were the most time-consuming.  Honestly, i really believe you should price what you feel it is worth, and others will follow your lead. (I believe this, but can't always remember it when pricing my own things).  Just, when you're making up your descriptions, emphasize that the little guys are highly detailed, or "miniatures" or other words that communicate to people that they aren't less than a big guy just because they're smaller in size.
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My sewing machine brings all the boys to the yard.

You'll find the fruits of my labor here:
www.odkins.etsy.com

Great vintage fabrics, books, supplies:
www.TheHaps.etsy.com
likespointysticks
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2006 11:19:39 AM »

One question, how much does size matter in pricing? For example, if I had a 5 inch tall amigurumi and a 8 inch one, would buyers expect the 5 inch to be a lower price even if they took the same amount of work?

I've had a hard time with just this issue - i make little stuffies and some other things, and often the littlest ones were the most time-consuming.  Honestly, i really believe you should price what you feel it is worth, and others will follow your lead. (I believe this, but can't always remember it when pricing my own things).  Just, when you're making up your descriptions, emphasize that the little guys are highly detailed, or "miniatures" or other words that communicate to people that they aren't less than a big guy just because they're smaller in size.
This sounds a little "slick", but depending on how much of a time difference there is and what the price you thinking of is, you might just set a fair price for the amount of work it took for you to make the little one and just charge incrementally more for the big guy, despite the fact that you didn't put as much actual time into it. Or, try to split the difference - underprice the little guy slightly, and overprice the big guy slightly, so that if you sold both, the difference averages out.

Hope that made sense . . .
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tiph_thompson
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« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2006 01:45:56 PM »

It made sense, and it's slick but logical, pointysticks.   Smiley
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My sewing machine brings all the boys to the yard.

You'll find the fruits of my labor here:
www.odkins.etsy.com

Great vintage fabrics, books, supplies:
www.TheHaps.etsy.com
K_lox
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2006 02:13:07 PM »

I agree. Thanks for the advice, likespointysticks. Pricing seems like one of the hardest things to figure out for me. Stupid pricing.  Roll Eyes
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