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Topic: Malene Birger Shawl Cropped Cardigan - - any thoughts on construction?  (Read 401 times)
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karissabissa
« on: October 13, 2006 09:01:35 PM »

Somebody posted a link to some great knitting inspiration pictures today and on that site I stumbled across this super cute Malene Birger Shawl Cropped Cardigan. 

Any similar patterns out there?  Or any thoughts on how to go about constructing this?  It seems fairly simple but I haven't branched out to doing my own patterns yet.  Any thoughts on the construction would be great!   Thanks!

The URL is - http://www.net-a-porter.com/product/16795  (there are larger, close up shots on the site)
« Last Edit: October 13, 2006 09:36:51 PM by Lothruin » THIS ROCKS   Logged
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2006 09:24:00 PM »

I would say that you could make a shawl from side to side in four row stripes of reverse stockinette alternated with two-four rows of regular stockinette and eyelet rows to make a sort of interesting ribbing. You'll also need to make increases using short rows as you can see along the lower part. When you've gotten it the right length to wrap around you, you bind off, then pick up stitches along the lower edge and make ribbing for the three or four inches. When you're done with that part, you'd pick up the stitches around the front and neck edge to make the ribbing around the neck.

That is so awesome; I think I might have to try it.
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2006 10:05:50 PM »

Yeah, what she said.  Except I think the neck edge ribbing comes before the bottom ribbing.  Finish with your body piece, then pick up stitches all along the edge from one bottom edge, up around the neck and back down, and work a few inches of ribbing.  then pick up stitches along the bottom edge, only you'll skip a significant portion on each side for the sleeves.

Edited to add:  Oh, I just found looked at the larger images, and having just designed a short-row hat, I actually think the eyelet effect is partly from the short-row shaping.  So, here's what you do: 

Cast on x number of stitches to reach from a little below the waist to your shoulder. Work rows 1-4 as K, P, P, K, then on row 5 switch back to K, but only work 4/5th of the stitches and just turn right around and work the P, P, K rows, leaving that other 1/5 of stitches on your other needle.  Keep that same pattern up, decreasing by 1/5th of your stitches every 4 rows, until you've worked the K, P, P, K 5 times each total, which will mean that your last 4 rows were only for 1/5 the number of stitches.  Then, on the next row, K2tog, yo across all your stitches, and P back, then start the whole thing over again.  The short rows add those extra large eyelets you see toward the top where the thing is stretched across the shoulders.  (If you were working 1 stitch less ever 2 rows, you'd wind up with a whole row of eyelet, but you'd have a much steeper angle, probably much too steep.)  So, anyway, keep on doing that until you've got a piece that's big enough around, and then do the ribbing.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2006 10:19:19 PM by Lothruin » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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karissabissa
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2006 06:41:05 AM »

You two are sooooooo smart!  I just might give this a shot this weekend.  It sounds do-able.  Maybe I'll make a mini one first to make sure I understand.  Woop!  Thanks soooo much!
-K
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erincatherine
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2006 08:19:49 AM »

this is stinking cute.  i think lothurin had it right.  it basically looks like a cape with ribbing around the waist w/ large "batwing" armholes and a button band.  i would love to see some results -- it looks way more flattering than a poncho, and i get sick of my sweaters all winter long!
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