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Topic: Digital Camera  (Read 1208 times)
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Eliza Jane
« on: October 13, 2006 04:45:48 PM »

Can anyone recommend a digital camera, specifically need for taking photos of paintings? What are people using that they are happy with?  I need some new photos for my website and cannot put off buying a camera any longer!
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lambert13
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2006 10:05:29 AM »

The camera you get is not nearly as important as how you photograph your art.  My $1000 Nikon SLR does as good as my $200 point and shoot Olympus for photographing art. 

First thing to do is narrow down your price range, features that you want and any brand preferences.  I would be more than happy to help once you get some of those narrowed down.
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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2006 10:38:07 AM »

What lambert said is completely true. But I will still tell you what I use.

I use my boyfriend's Canon Powershot A75. I don't think they actually make that model any more, but it's fantastic. I have a good deal of photography experience, and although its Manual settings aren't as adept as they could be, they're still pretty good. I need to get my own one of these days, and I'm thinking I'll get an A70.

The main problem I've had is that it has a cheap lens that tends to fisheye, making it difficult to photograph paintings without them having bowed edges. I finally figured out how to fix this, though--I just back up and then zoom in. Hooray!
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lambert13
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2006 11:06:06 AM »

That was also some good advice from Rocktopus.  Moving back and "zooming" in with the camera will eliminate distortion more effectively. 

Upon futher thought.......just about any camera with 4MP or more and a decent size optical zoom will do fine.  Canon (as Rocktopus mentioned) is a great brand for point and shoot cameras.  Go to Best Buy or similar and play with the cameras they have on display.  See which ones are easy to hold, easy menus to navigate, rechargeable batteries or not and which ones appeal to your eye.  Just as with cars, I think its somewhat important to have a camera that you like the looks of.  Of course the technical side is more important, but looks and size do matter.  I bought my current point and shoot partly because it was small enough to put in my pocket and the casing on it is made of black aluminum.
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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2006 11:32:47 AM »

I have to 3rd the recommendation on Canon digital cameras.  I've also owned Kodaks, which I was happy with -- but I truly love my Canon. 

I have the S2 IS, which is a good mid-price-range camera (IMHO).  I don't think they make the S2 anymore, but they have the S3 IS which is pretty much the same beast. 

If you want a dSLR, try the Canon Digital Rebel XT or XTi.  They're great "pro-sumer" cameras -- I have several friends who have them and ADORE them -- I'm currently lusting over one myself.  Wink  Haha.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2006 11:34:22 AM by mandi » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Amalas
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2006 11:42:12 AM »

I also have the Canon Powershot A75 and I LOVE it!  I've had it for 2 years now, and it's been absolutely great.  I use it all the time to take pics of my cakes (I do some cake decorating as a hobby), as well as crafts and family functions and such.  It's a good all-around camera that's powerful enough, but not too expensive.  Steve's Digicams has some good reviews of pretty much every camera there is.
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rocktopus
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2006 12:14:03 PM »

I also have the Canon Powershot A75 and I LOVE it!  I've had it for 2 years now, and it's been absolutely great.  I use it all the time to take pics of my cakes (I do some cake decorating as a hobby), as well as crafts and family functions and such.  It's a good all-around camera that's powerful enough, but not too expensive.  Steve's Digicams has some good reviews of pretty much every camera there is.


I can't believe how long the batteries last in this thing. Every onther digicam I've used, you have to change the battery about ever day. This one...almost never. I took it on a trip and too over 600 photos on the same batteries.
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Eliza Jane
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2006 06:19:01 PM »

I really appreciate all of your advice!  I have been doing some research and am close to making a decision...I hope.  Your suggestions have helped me narrow it down.  I'll let you know what I end up with.
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antigone
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2006 06:09:49 AM »

Maybe one which has an anti shake system. A lot of Konica Minolta cameras do, for instance. This helps when you're taking photos indoors without a flash.

Also, a camera which has manually adjustable white balance!! Digital photos tend to vary a lot in colour, I think. If you can adjust the white balance yourself you show the camera what white looks like in that specific light (for instance, by pointing at a white paper), and the colours in the pic will look realistic.
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2006 01:50:14 PM »

don't forget to LIGHT YOUR SUBJECTS WELL.

your camera could cost thousands, but your pics will still be disappointing if you don't take a little time to "stage" your photos.

even if you are using practical lighting (table lamps, overhead lights, sunlight, etc.) it will make a difference.  don't be afraid to really blast your subject with light.

but, with every different type of lighting there is that pesky White Balance issue, so make sure your camera can adapt.





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