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Topic: Feltalong #8 Needle felting over a 3D form - Hat  (Read 46710 times)
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GraceOblivious
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« Reply #30 on: September 13, 2006 04:14:55 AM »

I wonder if a chunk of that blue construction foam would work if I carved it into shape...

Is it a rigid or a squishible foam?  It for sure ought to work if it is squishible.  It will also work if it is rigid - but will be more difficult to manage the turning and withrigid foam (like a styrofoam head) hard to keep the foam from breaking up and getting into the felt.

For those if you are out there with forms ready for working - I have found lately that covering the hat form with a 1 gallon plastic bag keeps the foam from breaking down so much. 

This trick might also work for rigid foam - the rigid foam will still break up some but the bits won't get into the felt so much.

Jez - if you have access to the blue const. foam - go ahead and try it and report.  The more types of forms we come up with and use, the more we all learn what works and what does not. 

You could maybe test the foam for needling by taking some scraps or bits of batt/roving and making a small flat item - say a coaster or wrist cuff - and that will tell you how the foam will react.
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jezebel7383
« Reply #31 on: September 13, 2006 01:00:49 PM »

Today I bought a June Tailor bolster form at JoAnns. It seems stiff but still squishy so hopefully it works ok. The only thing is it seems a little skinny, so I'm wondering if I'll nedd to wrap something around it to make it more head sized? Or will that not matter?
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010 12:52:38 PM by jungrrl - Reason: fixed a coding issue » THIS ROCKS   Logged

GraceOblivious
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« Reply #32 on: September 13, 2006 03:43:49 PM »

Hi Jez, go to page 1 of this topic posts 2 & 3 - shows photos of the ones I made from the June Tailor bolster and detailed directions.  skim down to how to make a form.  If still unclear after reading that - ask again. Thanks.

BTW, you all can copy and paste the directions and print them out for personal use.  You just cannot print them out and sell them or make multiple copies for a class - without permission. Smiley
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radal16
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2006 07:34:05 AM »

Okay, my hat form is ready and my alpaca is ready.  My engines are revving for the next step!
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« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2006 11:54:36 AM »

Intresting- I was at a faire today and there was an alpaca booth and I started thinking hmmm... maybe I should make my hat with alpaca... maybe I will too. Because I have alpaca and then I won't have to buy any fiber.


BTW, Clover's needle felting tool is THE BOMB-DIGITY. I may post about it later.
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« Reply #35 on: September 16, 2006 12:21:41 PM »


BTW, Clover's needle felting tool is THE BOMB-DIGITY. I may post about it later.
Oh man...my father in law gave me some extra spending money and I was debating buying the very tool you mention, but I decided against it, not having heard any reviews on it.

I'll know next time I have the extra cash.

Thanks for sharing your opinion!
RM
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GraceOblivious
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« Reply #36 on: September 16, 2006 02:19:11 PM »

Radal16 and all -- OH NO all the photos and tute I'd prepared have gone missing.  YIKES.  Am off to reproduce them.  Hopefully will have a good part up tomorrow am. 

In brief layer the wool fiber over the form just like layout for wet felting (two to 3 thin crosswise layers), needle, turn inside out needle from the other side, check for thin spots, layer again building up thin spots.  If using an oval shape, use a length of same color wool yarn   to make a dividing line from center front(forhead) to center back (neck) that hangs below rim edge of hat- as you work the wool and turn keep the line centered to build the nice oval head shape.  Don't worry about making a smooth rim at this time - that will get shaped and firmed later.  Pictures tomorrow am.   My appologies. GraceO
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GraceOblivious
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« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2006 06:28:27 PM »

We have covered making the form so now we are at:


2.  Selecting needles - tool choices - buying or making

3.  Selecting fiber - what characteristics do you desire in your hat ; choosing fiber to obtain that character

4.  Punching it out: 
      a.    Creating a base;  managing shape; keeping it an even density


Selecting needles - tool choices - buying or making

1.  Selecting the needles
Begin with size 38 or 36 felting needles - these are the work horse needles, fatter, big barbs and enable fast felting - but they can leave the surface pitted

Finish with size 40 felting needles - finer, slower felting results, but leave a cleaner, smoother surface

2.  Tool Choices

A multi-needle tool holder is advisible - one with 5 or more needles. 
     -there are many types available, metal handles and wood handles, where one can change the needles such as this  http://hookedonfelt.com/tools.htm These are similar but not exactly like the multi-needle tool I use
      - Clover has recently come out with a new multi-needle holder with a safety gard http://www.marrhaven.com/cloverflttool.html
LtG said
Quote
BTW, Clover's needle felting tool is THE BOMB-DIGITY.

Here is LtG's review http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=121249.0

One can do with fewer needles, it will just take longer.

If anyone makes their own multi-needle tool holder, please share what you use.  There is a topic on the polymer clay board about making tool handles. http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=118670.0

« Last Edit: September 18, 2006 06:11:09 AM by GraceOblivious » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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Oh how I love to Sew and Make felt
GraceOblivious
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« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2006 03:48:26 AM »

Selecting fiber - what characteristics do you desire in your hat ; choosing fiber to obtain that character
1.  First hat or new to needle felting - consider using a really good needle felting fiber, batt or roving - Icelandic, Romeny, Corriedale - the thicker, more crimped fibers.  The thin softer fiber such as merino is more difficult to control.  (I have not seen or tried alpaca - so Radal16 - do let us know how it goes.) 
AVOID - superwash roving - it has been treated so the fiber shafts are no longer scaley and does not felt well.

The more clingy easy to felt fibers keep the shape of the form with less effort by you.  The softer fibers tend to enlarge and take more work to bring the sides and edge into shape. 

TIP- If you are using soft longer to felt fiber - use a smaller hat form than head size.  For rapid, easy felting fiber use a hat form about the same size as head.

2. Blend fiber types to get color/textures desired.
-Layer different types,
-card the types together - use pet brushes to blend the fibers
or blend a lot faster with a real wool carder if available (nice but expensive.)

3. Be responsive to the fiber being used. ,  Mostly, work with what you have, see how it responds and make changes in needles and forms accordingly. 

Needle felting in some ways is very easy - just poking barbed needles into fiber.

Needle felting in some ways is very hard - the fiber used is less standardized than say fabric or yarn- because it is less processed, closer to the sheep/goat/animal, it retains individual character and requires attention and adaptation to get it to respond.  So it is much harder, IMHO, to make patterns to follow or to provide instructions. It takes practice working fiber to get the feel and sense of what the fiber will and won't do.
 
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006 04:00:25 AM by GraceOblivious » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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GraceOblivious
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« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2006 04:39:15 AM »

 Punching it out:
       Creating a base;  managing shape; keeping it an even density


1.  Cover the foam form with a plastic bag, to help keep fibers from imbedding so strongly in the foam.


2.  Lay fiber in cross wise strips on the top - one layer front to back, one layer side to side.  Punch enough in an overall fashion to get the layers to begin to stick together - this helps keep the fiber from sliding about when you lay fiber on the sides. I usually have the needles angled and poke toward the center to move the felting action toward the center.  Remember fiber felts in the direction of the needle tip.

3. Lay out fiber on the sides - from top to bottom (rim) edge if the form is the desired hat depth let fiber hand just below the bottom of the form; if you have drawn lines for hat depth leave fiber just a touch (1/2 inch or so) below the desired depth line.


4.  Lay out fiber around the sides, and again going over the top. This photo shows the covered form on my lap with the bottom facing me.  The top of hat toward the table.  I set the green foam pillow on mylap and the developing hat on top of that, just incase of wild poking - OH and don't hug the hat form to your chest and poke.  Grin


5.  Poke, poke, poke - work on getting an even shrinkage without folds, pleets wobbles - alternate angle of needle enterance to get felting action in all directions.  Poke lightly so needle tips do not penetrate foam much.  If you are an aggressive poker you may attach the wool to the foam, even with the plastic bag in place.  Slide your hand under the wool layer to assess how deeply you are poking and adjust pressure/depth of punch if possible. 

6.  When you have a nice smooth layer of felting over the form, gently turn  the felting mass off the form.  Rough pulling will stretch the wool out of shape - even gently turning will cause some enlarging of the wool. 


7.  Turn the wool mass inside out - set on form and poke, poke, poke again. Poke until the wool is once again snug against the form - in the photo, one side has been punched, the other bows out as has not been punched yet.


8.  Mark front to back on wool with a strip of wool yarn - the sample shows it with different color yarn so it can be seen in photo - it is better to actually use yarn of similar color to the hat.

punch it into place from center front to center back


9.  Loosen the fiber from the form by sliding a hand between the form and fiber- this is why the squishy form is nice, you can squish the form with less pulling up on the fiber.   Do some more allover poking to continue the felting process.

10.  Turn inside out again, lining yarn ends up with center front and center back marks.  Poke, poke, poke again to get hat into shape and fitting against form smoothy. 

11.  Lift hat off form - do not turn inside out.  The yarn marker remains on the inside.

12.  Check for thin spots.  Hold the budding hat up to the light -  mark thin spots

that is as far as I got with the photos, more later today.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006 04:45:27 AM by GraceOblivious » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Etsy http://www.feltsewcrafty.etsy.com
Zibbet http://www.zibbet.com/aTranquilNook
Blog http://aTranquilNook.blogspot.com/
Oh how I love to Sew and Make felt
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