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Topic: Painting v.s. Blending  (Read 1019 times)
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BeePea
« on: August 11, 2006 04:06:24 PM »

I'm on a super-miniature-food splurge....

I was following this tutorial:

http://park2.wakwak.com/%7Epine/studio/howto/index.htm

I was okay up until the pie-case. I used acrylic. It went on too thick, so I tried to thin it.. first of all using a dab of white spirit (stupid idea! it just separated) then water (not so good). I tried to translate the page with Altavista and the artist says the paints can be "acrylic or watercolour"...

I LOVE glassattic and have followed so so SO many of the links, but for my miniature food, i'm now torn between:

sculpting then painting for shading
making blends and canes and then assembling the food

The kiwis are a great example I feel, because it was easy for me to just paint onto the translucent green.

Also.. any other tips on making miniature food look even more realistic? I know that people use chalk on bread etc. to give it a shaded colour, but I just can't get it right!! It always looks solid and unrealistic.


*sighs*

so do I invest in a pasta machine or some paints? (warning: i'd rather buy a cane from someone more talented than myself than make one, so I am leaning towards the "add detail with a brush" option!!!)

Thanks all

xx

/edited:

To give an example of what I mean...

BOTH these minis are fantastic.. by no means am I trying to imply that one artist is better than the other. However, I want to make my mini food look more like the picture at the bottom rather than the one at the top...



« Last Edit: August 11, 2006 04:26:51 PM by BeePea » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Diane B.
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Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2006 05:30:39 PM »

Quote
I was following this tutorial:
http://park2.wakwak.com/%7Epine/studio/howto/index.htm
I was okay up until the pie-case.


Could you tell us which of the lessons from this page you were trying to do??  I see only one which has anything to do with a "pie" and that's the one which also has kiwis... is that it?

Quote
I used acrylic. It went on too thick, so I tried to thin it.. first of all using a dab of white spirit (stupid idea! it just separated) then water (not so good).

Ooops. "spirits" are not a solvent for acrylic paints... must use water or an acrylic medium.

Quote
I tried to translate the page with Altavista and the artist says the paints can be "acrylic or watercolour"...

I think she uses both of those for all of her miniatures, so each lesson might use something different.  Also I belive most of the clays she uses are air-dry, not polymer, so there could be some differences there (but acrylics and other things can be successfully used on polymer clay).

Quote
I LOVE glassattic and have followed so so SO many of the links, but for my miniature food, i'm now torn between:
sculpting then painting for shading
making blends and canes and then assembling the food

Not sure what this has to do with GlassAttic (and thanks btw Grin)... the lessons and tips on my Miniatures page have some sculpting, some canes/blends, and some other materials for coloring etc.  Which ones are used depend just on the particular item and lesson.

Quote
Also.. any other tips on making miniature food look even more realistic? I know that people use chalk on bread etc. to give it a shaded colour, but I just can't get it right!! It always looks solid and unrealistic.

There are lots of tips in the lessons and on my Miniatures page itself about how to apply chalk or other materials to shade clay.  If you have questions that can't be answered there, you might want to join NoraJean's Miniatures mailing list and ask there:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CITY-o-Clay

You did pick a hard one to try first though!!... in Japanese translation yet!  Would be better to check out some of the other lessons on making breads, pies and sweets first.

Quote
so do I invest in a pasta machine or some paints? (warning: i'd rather buy a cane from someone more talented than myself than make one, so I am leaning towards the "add detail with a brush" option!!!)

Are you just trying to decide here between making canes and using paints (for everything)Huh




Diane B.



« Last Edit: December 16, 2008 10:30:46 AM by batgirl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
BeePea
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2006 02:35:35 AM »

Quote
I was following this tutorial:
http://park2.wakwak.com/%7Epine/studio/howto/index.htm
I was okay up until the pie-case.


Could you tell us which of the lessons from this page you were trying to do??  I see only one which has anything to do with a "pie" and that's the one which also has kiwis... is that it?

Quote
I used acrylic. It went on too thick, so I tried to thin it.. first of all using a dab of white spirit (stupid idea! it just separated) then water (not so good).

Ooops. "spirits" are not a solvent for acrylic paints... must use water or an acrylic medium.

Quote
I tried to translate the page with Altavista and the artist says the paints can be "acrylic or watercolour"...

I think she uses both of those for all of her miniatures, so each lesson might use something different.  Also I belive most of the clays she uses are air-dry, not polymer, so there could be some differences there (but acrylics and other things can be successfully used on polymer clay).

Quote
I LOVE glassattic and have followed so so SO many of the links, but for my miniature food, i'm now torn between:
sculpting then painting for shading
making blends and canes and then assembling the food

Not sure what this has to do with GlassAttic (and thanks btw Grin)... the lessons and tips on my Miniatures page have some sculpting, some canes/blends, and some other materials for coloring etc.  Which ones are used depend just on the particular item and lesson.

Quote
Also.. any other tips on making miniature food look even more realistic? I know that people use chalk on bread etc. to give it a shaded colour, but I just can't get it right!! It always looks solid and unrealistic.

There are lots of tips in the lessons and on my Miniatures page itself about how to apply chalk or other materials to shade clay.  If you have questions that can't be answered there, you might want to join NoraJean's Miniatures mailing list and ask there:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CITY-o-Clay

You did pick a hard one to try first though!!... in Japanese translation yet!  Would be better to check out some of the other lessons on making breads, pies and sweets first.

Quote
so do I invest in a pasta machine or some paints? (warning: i'd rather buy a cane from someone more talented than myself than make one, so I am leaning towards the "add detail with a brush" option!!!)

Are you just trying to decide here between making canes and using paints (for everything)Huh


Diane B.
GlassAttic....polym er clay "encyclopedia" http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
little bit'o photosharing: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/dianeatglassattic/my_photos



Hey Diane! It' so cool to have a reply from you- I LOVE your website, it's the best one on the internet for polymer clay information- thank you so much for putting so much time/effort into it for people like me  Grin

Also..

Yes, it was the kiwi one.. I'll post a picture of my efforts later today. The main problems with it were the solid colour acheived by using acrylic and the fact that my black ink (which I used tofor the kiwi seeds) ran when I added gloss (whoops!!).

And yes, I am trying to choose between painting everything or making canes. I don't really like using polymer clay for making milfleur items.. I use it a lot more to create miniatures and various sculptures for pendants (like little  toasters!).

I am being drawn to investing in a pasta machine now though.. if only for the ease of obtaining fantastically even sheets of clay.

Thank you so much for your brilliant reply. I hope you've had a lovely weekend!

- H BeePea xx  Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2006 01:31:48 PM »

Quote
- I LOVE your website.


Thanks  Grin... glad it's helping!

Quote
Yes, it was the kiwi one..  The main problems with it were the solid colour acheived by using acrylic . . .!!).

You may want to thin down your acrylic with water or an acrylic medium to increase the transparency, or use an oil paint which is more transparent, and I think the "water-soluble oils" are also somewhat transparent, but not sure about those. 
Are you making your clay items like these from translucent clay?... that could help a bit too maybe?  (I'm assuming you're using a gloss sealer too to increase the look of wetness.)

Quote
and the fact that my black ink (which I used tofor the kiwi seeds) ran when I added gloss (whoops!!).

You might want to check out the inks and pens on this page for those that won't run, and other ways to deal with that (you can also gloss first, then add some of those inks, etc.):
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/letters_inks.htm
(...click on Inks for Writing...)

HTH,


Diane B.


« Last Edit: December 16, 2008 10:29:35 AM by batgirl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Sockdiva
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2006 12:36:51 PM »

Diane B. can take care of all the technical stuff...I just want to say YUMMMM!!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

http://sockdiva.etsy.com
Omiyage, unique yarns, fibers, and jewelry

http://deedolce.blogspot.com/
BeePea
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2006 09:17:39 AM »

Dear Diane

Thank you for all your help.
I invested in a pasta machine yesterday.. I actually saved 10 on it so splurged and also bought a clay extruder (yaaaaay!). I'm so excited about using them..

I can't wait to show off my work eventually.
Thanks again for all your help!

H x Cheesy
THIS ROCKS   Logged

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